Guide to the Records of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of New York, undated, 1855-1985, 2004-
 
*I-42

Reprocessed by Dan Ma and Marvin Rusinek (February 2008)

American Jewish Historical Society

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 294-6160

Fax: (212) 294-6161

Email: reference@ajhs.org

URL: http://www.ajhs.org

© 2014, American Jewish Historical Society, Boston, MA and New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.
Finding aid was encoded by Marvin Rusinek on April 14, 2008. Description is in English.
20130813 Added link to database.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of New York
Title: Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of New York, records
Dates:undated, 1855-1985, 2004-
Abstract: Hebrew Orphan Asylum was founded in 1822 as the Hebrew Benevolent Society. It underwent various changes of name until 1906; when it merged into The Jewish Child Care Association of New York in 1940 The collection includes extensive administrative records including financial statements; property records; Board, Committee, and Executive minutes; donation books; publications; and state and government correspondence and reports. The collection also includes children’s admission and discharge ledgers; medical records; and conduct books. Also within the collection are childcare studies; dedication speeches; histories; news clippings; and photographs.
Languages: The collection is in English and German.
Quantity: 75.2 linear feet (53 manuscript boxes; 4 ½ manuscript boxes; 21 [16 x 20"] oversized boxes; 6 [20 x 24"] oversized boxes; 1 MAP folder)
Identification: I-42
Repository: American Jewish Historical Society
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Historical Note

On the night of September 20, 1941, the Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of New York (HOA) held its annual dinner party, organized by its graduates. Usually, the dinner drew a few hundred of the Asylum alumni. On this night however; more than a thousand former residents attended the event - a rare scene. The most poignant moment occurred as everybody in the party sang the HOA alma mater and "Auld Lang Syne," knowing that HOA officially closed its doors earlier that day.1 The closing of HOA not only marked the end of a great child-care institution, but the entire institutional child care system in America.

Originally named the Hebrew Benevolent and Orphan Asylum Society, the Hebrew Orphan Asylum (HOA) was created out of a merger of two New York Jewish benevolent societies in 1860: the Hebrew Benevolent Society (HBS) and the German Hebrew Benevolent Society (GHBS). After resisting a merger due to friction between German Reform leaders and Sephardic and Ashkenazi traditional leaders, the two groups finally joined after the threat of missionaries and conversion was made public by the Mortara Affair, in which an Italian Jewish boy, Edward Mortara, was kidnapped and converted by a servant girl. The possibilities of Jewish orphans being cared for by non-Jewish asylums with missionary goals was a major factor that led the two societies to pool resources and open the first Jewish orphan asylum in New York City.2

The HOA's first location was bought in April 1860. A brick house located at 1 Lamartine Place, Chelsea, (now West 29th Street between Eighth and Ninth Avenues), it was converted from a family home and considered temporary housing for the first enrollment of thirty children. Few records remain to tell the lives of these children, but it is not hard to imagine that with limited resources and no trained child-care personnel for supervision, children found life harsh. As Henry Bauer, recorded as "the first full orphan" described the daily schedule, "get up, say your prayers, get your breakfast, go to school, come back, study your lessons, study Hebrew, get your supper, and go to bed. Very little play---very little play!"3

Fortunately, in 1860 a series of laws passed by the New York State legislature allowed the city government to offer a permanent site for the orphanage, located at East 77th Street and Third Avenue. The state and city would contribute two-thirds of the building costs, as well as the land. The newly erected orphanage with fifty-two children was officially opened in November 1863.4

Two years later, Dr. Max Grunbaum replaced the first superintendent Samuel Hart. A former Hebrew school principal, Grunbaum is called a "bungling administrator" by Hyman Bogen. Grunbaum sent the children to school on the High Holidays, causing deep criticism in the Jewish press. Grunbaum also dealt with the 1865 smallpox epidemic at the HOA, which resulted in the first death of a resident. He resigned in 1867. The HOA was fortunate to have Dr. Abraham Jacobi known as the "father of pediatrics," as chief of its medical staff. Dr. Jacobi would continue working for the HOA for fifty-nine years, guiding his patients through a severe dysentery epidemic in 1898, a polio epidemic in 1916, and adding a full time dental clinic and an eye clinic in 1918. Throughout his tenure, relatively few children died of illnesses, which was unusual for the time.5

Louis Schnabel, Grunbaum's successor, was faced with full capacity enrollment of 150 in 1868. He reorganized the administration and made new rules for the children: each child now had a number and visits from relatives were strictly regulated. He also began an industrial school which taught older boys shoemaking and printing and converted a lecture room into a synagogue where he personally conducted regular religious services based on the tenets of Reform Judaism. The warden, ironically named Mr. Goodman, who did the majority of supervising, was known to use rawhide whip and other severe punishments.6

In the 1870s, three New York State laws were enacted that had a profound impact on the Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Jewish orphanages in general. The first two laws, passed in the 1874 session, allowed the HOA to sell its current property in the hopes of enlarging its facilities. In addition, a law was passed that put the HOA on the same level as the New York Juvenile Asylum, making HOA eligible for New York State funding. In 1874, 70% of the HOA budget was paid for by New York State. These generous subsidies continued into the 1920s. Additional funding for HOA came from individual and business donations, public benefits, and products created from its vocational schools.7

The third New York state law, titled the Children's Law of 1875, was a victory against missionary movements. The law was two-fold; children were required to be removed from almshouses where they shared living quarters with the rest of the welfare population into their own orphanage asylums, and each child was to be placed in an asylum that matched their parents' faith. As a result, the number of private child institutions grew rapidly.8

Population increases in the 1870s, due to economic depression, epidemics, and immigration, led Jewish leaders, such as Myer S. Isaacs, editor of the Jewish Messenger, and others to argue for a more efficient system of philanthropy. As Isaacs wrote, "the vital defect of our charities today is that intelligent study of the poor has been overlooked..." In 1874, the United Hebrew Charities was established by five organizations: HOA, Hebrew Benevolent Fuel Association, Ladies' Benevolent Society of the Congregation Gates of Prayer, Hebrew Relief Society, and the Yorkville Ladies' Benevolent Society. HOA would donate $647,100 to UHC over the course of 34 years, aiding the widows and poor families of the City.9

Unable to care for all of its residents, HOA began a boarding out program, in which families are paid to house residents. The exact year when this began cannot be confirmed, due to a gap in annual reports in the collection. However; the first mention of "boarding out for want of room" appears in the 1875 annual report. This program continued until 1893 and was reintroduced by Superintendent Solomon Lowenstein in 1906.10

Immigration surges brought new social problems to the Jewish community: unemployment, malnutrition, chronic diseases, destitute children and widows, etc. The relinquishing of one's children to the asylum not only prevented starvation, but also offered the possibilities of a vocational or college education, medical care, and easier adjustment to American life. The well established German-Jewish community, who had immigrated to New York City in the early and mid 1800s, used their benevolence to advocate Reform Judaism, which they had brought over from Germany. They restricted contact with the orphan's family, alienating many orphans from the Yiddish language, culture, and Orthodoxy of their parents, their goal being to Americanize the newcomers. As a President of the Ladies Sewing Society reports in 1913-1914; "…we shall meet to sew for the orphan children, many of them of foreign parentage, and now privileged to grow up as American citizens in the Jewish Home."11

In order to educate their early charges, and later, to Americanize newcomers, the HOA offered a Home school and vocation training. In 1869, with Louis Schnabel as head, HOA opened a shoemaking factory and in 1871 added a printmaking shop. In 1883, the HOA Industrial School evolved into the Hebrew Technical Institute, which was formed by HOA, United Hebrew Charities, and the Hebrew Free School Association. HOA also sent its residents to the Baron and Clara de Hirsch Trade Schools and the Hebrew Technical School for Girls. Residents were sent to public schools until 1872, when overcrowding led HOA to establish its own school within its walls. By 1900, all of the residents through sixth grade attended this school (called P.S. 192); older children attended neighborhood public schools, vocational schools, and/or City College.12

By 1878, enrollment had reached 300, leading HOA to transfer all female residents to two rented houses on East 86th Street, and even more significantly, restricting applicants from Brooklyn. Faced with an emergency, the Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of Brooklyn was opened the same year. HOA would open its new building at Amsterdam Avenue and 137th street with an initial inhabitancy of 370 children in 1884.13

Hermann J. Baar, perhaps the most well known of the superintendents, was a talented preacher and preached sermons to children on Saturdays, which often were reprinted in newspapers such as The New York Herald and the American Hebrew. He also set up a Cadet Corps and military marching band, which brought wide acclaim from the public. The Corps and marching band won first prize in competition with other college and grammar school children during the George Washington Centennial in April 1889, with then President Benjamin Harrison looking on.14

Dr. Baar was particularly remembered for his excessive disciplinary and religious training: his tight regimentation demanding conformity from the children, including silence at all times, and curtailing of parental visiting rights (limited only to four times a year). Little wonder that Hyman Bogen in The Luckiest Orphans terms Dr. Boar's managing style of HOA as "behind the Baars." In order to better monitor children's behavior, Baar introduced a monitoring system where older children and graduates (governors) supervised younger ones. Before long this system was widely abused by these inexperienced monitors; older children bullying younger ones became a common practice in the orphanage.15

By the turn of the twentieth century, partly because of the influence of new theories of psychology and social work, the focus of child-care policy had gradually shifted to the psychological well being of individual children. The succeeding superintendents began to liberate the orphanage from the rigid institutional policies set up previously. Baar's successor, David Adler, relieved some of the regimentation; he added pockets to uniforms (according to Hyman Bogen "…the boys didn't know what to make of it; few of them owned enough possessions to fill even one pocket"), took away the silence rule, allowed mail to be written and sent by the children, and increased the amount of outings. Most importantly, Adler abolished corporal punishment, mainly by hiring governors who were not graduates; however, since he kept the monitorial system, the beatings continued. Rudolph Coffee, a Jewish Theological Seminary rabbinical student and the next superintendent, worked to "deinstitutionalize" the orphanage. He "abolished" the uniform, silenced the rising bell, allowed hair to grow, and established the first publication created by the children titled "The Chronicle of the H.O.A."16

In 1909, President Theodore Roosevelt held the First White House Conference on the Care of Dependent Children which changed the course of future child-care policy by endorsing the home care / foster care system as superior to the institutional care system. The Conference marked a shift in the child-care paradigm, implying that if any child-care institution wanted financial support from the government, it would soon have to abandon its institutional practice.17

The White House Conference coincided with the tenure of Solomon Lowenstein, a Reform Rabbi and the first HOA superintendent to have social work experience. Lowenstein was determined to "individualize the child," however; faced with over 1,000 residents, this proved to be a daunting task. During his tenure, HOA reintroduced boarding out on a big scale, paying families to board children. Lowenstein also convinced the Board of Trustees to rent a farm in Valhalla, Westchester, where sixty-three fortunate boys spent a year, learning how to farm in a relaxed atmosphere. Although the Valhalla experience was only to last five years before the farm was sold, the idea led to the HOA renting two camps for boys and girls in Bear Mountain Park in 1919. By the mid-1920s, almost every resident was able to attend a camp for a few weeks in the summer months.18

During Lowenstein's tenure, HOA also established its first after-care facilities, pioneering the development for Jewish orphanages. Corner House, located at 21 Charles Street, was opened in 1916 to ease the transition of discharge for graduate boys, and was sponsored by the Junior League; Friendly Home for Girls was also opened in 1916, and was sponsored by the Ladies Sewing Society.19

A significant successor to the 1909 White House Conference was the 1915 New York State Widow's Pension Law, which provided stipends to widows with dependent children. In 1917, HOA began experiencing its first decreases in population in "many years." As noted in the annual report;

In 1918, due to pressure from City officials and Jewish civil leaders, the Executive Board decided to experiment with a "cottage system" model and purchased a large parcel of land in the Bronx. In stark contrast to the institutional care system, in which children's daily activities were under close scrutiny by governors or governesses, the cottage system, pioneered in the U.K. and then adopted by the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society in 1908, allowed a smaller group of children to live together and to govern themselves under the limited supervision of the cottage mother. With greater autonomy and the home-life environment that self-government created, the cottage system made children's life more enjoyable and thus became a preferred child-care model when home care or foster care was not available.21

In order to achieve this relocation plan, the HOA relied on the newly formed New York Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropies. The Federation was established in 1917 to coordinate fundraising efforts, distribute financial resources, and streamline welfare services among Jewish welfare services agencies in New York, eliminating duplicate services to preserve financial resources for better uses. Unfortunately, likely due to financial costs, a cottage system was never implemented at HOA and the residents stayed at Amsterdam Avenue.22

Seeing that nothing could be done to shift their institutional child-care policy, Lionel Simmonds, the first former resident to become superintendent, as well as the HOA's last leader, continued to reform the institution's regimentation policy to a greater extent - replacing governors and governesses with counselors, hiring more counselors in order to pay individual attention to children as much as possible, relaxing family visiting hours, and increasing the number of extra-curricular activities mainly in music and athletics.23

In 1922, a New York Jewish Children's Clearing Bureau was established due to the recommendations of a Federation child study. The Bureau became the centralized intake, follow up, and evaluation for dependent Jewish children, deciding which institution would be appropriate for each child. The Clearing Bureau favored foster care above institutional care, and in combination with widow's pension laws, New Deal legislation, and other factors the HOA was led to change its resident population from poor to emotionally disturbed children. After years of negotiations, HOA merged with the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society of New York (HSGS) and other child care agencies to form the New York Association for Jewish Children in 1940. NYAJC would concentrate on providing referral and foster care services as well as health care services for mentally retarded children.24

Soon after the merger, the HOA quickly placed out the remaining children, who were either sent back to their parents or to foster homes; a few years later, the building was converted into offices for the New York Association of Jewish Children. After the farewell dinner on September 20, 1941, HOA was officially closed. In 1942, the building was acquired by New York City for $1.3 million. In 1955, after the city turned over the building to the Parks Department, it was demolished and became a public park.25

After the HOA had closed its doors, its graduates turned a previous student publication called Rising Bell into an alumni publication. At the same time, alarmed by the fact that the closing of HOA meant no more new alumni, the members of the two existing alumni associations, the Seligman Solomon Society (S.S.S), formed in 1887 to commemorate the charitable work done by one of early HOA's Board of Directors, Seligman Solomon, and the Academy Alumni Association (A.A.A.), created in 1939, agreed to consolidate their resources to form a new alumni association in 1957 called the H.O.A. Association.26 Today the H.O.A. Association still maintains its functions by holding annual reunion parties and gathers contributions for charity purposes. Interestingly, the much criticized "militarization" policy set up by Dr. Baar seemed to have paid off when America joined the two world wars. A large number of HOA children were enlisted to serve the country; and found that their HOA cadet corps training adjusted them well to military life. During the wars, quite a number of these graduates received high honors and promotions from the government for their bravery.27

The records of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of New York are dated from the early 1850s. The records document not only the early Jewish philanthropic efforts to help newly arrived immigrants, but the long-term struggle of desperate immigrant families to situate themselves in a new and culturally alien country, while preserving their Jewish heritage. The same records also reflect the gradual evolution of American child-care policies; the effect of government funding and programs; the development of child psychology, social work, and pediatrics; and provide a vital insight into New York City history.

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Scope and Content Note

The records of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum include extensive administrative records, child records, and material on its affiliated organizations. The records contain documents from the HOA's parent organization, the Hebrew Benevolent Society (HBS). They continue until the present day, including the most recent alumni publications.

The records provide unique insight into the life of Eastern European immigrants in New York City in the late 1800s to early 1900s, as well as the progression of social and medical services reflected in the departmental programs and standards of HOA and the result of State and Federal law. HOA orphan alumni and genealogists will find personal histories within the children's admission and discharge ledgers, medical records, and conduct books. Please note, however; that due to privacy concerns, some child records may be restricted from access.

The administrative records consist of financial statements; property records; Board, Committee, and Executive minutes; donation books; publications; and state and government correspondence and reports. HOA's affiliated associations include the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropies, Ladies Sewing Society, Emmanuel Lehman Fund (a scholarship fund), and alumni associations. In addition, the records contain childcare studies, dedication speeches, histories, news clippings, and photographs.

Researchers should note that gaps in early student publications and alumni publications may be filled by material in other collections held by the American Jewish Historical Society.

Portraits and Photographs includes images of the board of directors of HOA and the pictures of HOA children taken from their daily activities and excursions to the upstate summer camps. However, a number of them remain unidentified. Additional photographs may be located in other collections held by the American Jewish Historical Society.

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Arrangement

The collection is divided into seven series, as described below:

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

The collection is open to all researchers by permission of the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society, except items that are restricted due to their fragility.

Use Restrictions

Information concerning the literary rights may be obtained from the Executive Director of the American Jewish Historical Society. Users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. For more information contact:
American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: reference@ajhs.org

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Related Material

Additional materials related to the Records of Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of New York can be found in following AJHS records and collections:

Brooklyn Hebrew Orphan Asylum Records, I-230
Hebrew Benevolent Society Records, I-258
Hebrew Infant Asylum Records, I-166
Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society Records, I-43
Home for Hebrew Infants Records, I-232
Hyman Bogen Collection of Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Seligman Solomon Society Memorabilia, P-767
The Industrial Removal Office Records, I-91
Jewish Child Care Association of New York Records, I-235
Jewish Children's Clearing Bureau, I-81
New York Association for Jewish Children Records, I-236;
Seligman Solomon Society Records, I-6

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Database

A searchable database indexes names recorded in a ledger titled "Index of Children, 1860-1900." The ledger is located in Box 38. The page numbers shown in the database table are listed in the ledger, however; they may or may not correspond to other ledgers located in the collection.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:
Identification of item, date (if known); Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of New York, records; I-42; box number; folder number; American Jewish Historical Society, New York, NY, and Boston, MA.

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Acquisition Information

The records of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum of the City of New York were donated in 1985 by its successor, the Jewish Child Care Association of New York.

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Access Points

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Container List

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

 

Series I: HOA Administrative Records, undated, 1855-1974, 1977-1978, 1985, 2004-2007

English.
Boxes 1-68.
Arrangement:

Arranged into nine subseries.

Scope and Content:

Series I contains annual reports, constitution, by-laws of both HOA and its parent organization, the Hebrew Benevolent Society (HBS), meeting minutes and reports prepared by various executive boards and committees, financial and property records, children's records, official and student publications. The series is divided into nine subseries: A) HOA annual reports, President's reports, the Constitutions and By-Laws of the Hebrew Benevolent Society and HOA; B ) Meeting minutes of Board of Trustees, Executive Committee, Board of Directors; C) Various HOA committees' meeting minutes and departmental reports; D) Children's records; E) HOA Financial records; F) HOA property records; G) Donation / Bequest records; H) HOA publications and programs; I: State / City government records (in relation to HOA). Subseries D "Children's records" is further subdivided into four subsubseries to better reflect the diverse sources of the records.

Subseries A: HOA annual reports, President's reports, the constitutions and by-laws of the Hebrew Benevolent Society and HOA, undated, 1858-1859, 1863-1893, 1895-1901, 1903-1911, 1915-1926, 1928-1930, 1932, 1940

English.
Boxes 1-2.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subseries A contains annual reports and presidents' letters, dating from 1863 to 1926. The reports demonstrate HOA's performance and achievements, generally and by department. The early Constitutions and By-Laws of HOA and its parent organization, the Hebrew Benevolent Society (HBS), are also included in this series. Please note that since 1928, HOA annual presidential reports were renamed The Twig.

[See also: Series I: HOA Administrative Records; Subseries B: Meeting minutes of Board of Trustees, Executive Committee, Board of Directors; Subseries C: Various HOA committees' meeting minutes and departmental reports]

BoxFolderTitleDate
1 1 Annual Reports 1863-1865, 1867-1873, 1875, 1877-1879
1 2 Annual Reports 1874-1882, 1884-1886
1 3 Annual Reports 1887-1890, 1893
1 4 Annual Reports 1895-1897, 1899-1901
1 5 Annual Reports 1903-1907
BoxFolderTitleDate
2 1 Annual Report 1908-1911, 1915
2 2 Annual Report 1916-1918, 1920
2 3 Annual Report 1919-1920
2 4 Annual Report (draft) 1920
2 5 Annual Report 1921-1924, 1926
2 6 Annual Report Data 1924-1925
2 7 Annual Report "Dummy" 1926
2 8 By-Laws (HOA) undated
2 9 (Constitution and By-laws of) the Hebrew Benevolent Society 1858-1859
2 10 Constitution and By-Laws (HOA) 1867, 1924
2 11 Incorporation Acts and Resolutions (HOA) 1879
2 12 President's Reports -- The Twig 1928-1930, 1932
2 13 (President's reports) Administrative Reports (Miscellaneous) 1928, 1940

Subseries B: Meeting minutes of Board of Trustees, Executive Committee, Board of Directors, undated, 1860, 1867-1877, 1895-1940

English.
Boxes 3-9.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subseries B contains meeting minutes and reports prepared by the Board of Directors, Board of Trustees, and the Executive Committee.

[See also: Series I: HOA Administrative Records, Subseries A: HOA annual reports, President's reports, the constitutions and by-laws of the Hebrew Benevolent Society and HOA; Subseries C: Various HOA committees' meeting minutes and departmental reports]

BoxFolderTitleDate
3 1 Annual Meetings Minutes (bound) 1900-1931
3 2 Board of Directors Minutes (bound) 1895-1897
3 3 Board of Directors Minutes (bound) 1897-1900
BoxFolderTitleDate
4 1 Board of Directors Minutes (bound) 1900-1901
4 2 Board of Directors Minutes (bound) 1901
4 3 Board of Directors Minutes (bound) 1903-1905
BoxFolderTitleDate
5 1 Board of Governors-Minutes (bound) 1869-1877
5 2 Board of Trustees Members (list) 1901-1940
BoxFolderTitleDate
6(OS2) 1 Board of Trustees Minutes (bound) 1868-1875
6(OS2) 2 Board of Trustees Minutes (bound) 1909-1919
BoxFolderTitleDate
7 1 Board of Trustees Minutes 1930-1933
7 2 Board of Trustees Minutes 1934-1936
7 3 Board of Trustees Minutes 1937-1940
7 4 (Executive Committee) Administrative and Committee Reports - 1 of 2 1923
7 5 (Executive Committee) Administrative and Committee Reports - 2 of 2 1923
7 6 (Executive Committee) Administrative and Committee Reports - 1 of 2 1927
7 7 (Executive Committee) Administrative and Committee Reports - 2 of 2 1927
BoxFolderTitleDate
8(OS2) 1 Executive Committee Minutes (bound) 1901-1909
8(OS2) 2 Executive Committee Minutes (bound) 1909-1930
BoxFolderTitleDate
9 1 Executive Committee Minutes 1930-1939
9 2 (HOA Members') Annual Meetings Minutes (bound) 1867-1875
9 3 Invitation to serve on Board of Trustees (photocopy) circa 1860
9 4 Memorandum on Membership of the HOA undated
9 5 "Official Business" (Minutes, Elections) undated, 1870, 1876

Subseries C: Various HOA committees' meeting minutes and departmental reports, undated, 1871-1884, 1895-1907, 1913, 1919-1941

English.
Boxes 10-11.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subseries C contains committees' meeting minutes and departmental reports, revealing the internal organizational structure of HOA and how HOA conducted its daily operations. These include meeting minutes of the Committee on Dowry Fund, used to assist graduated girls' marriage arrangements; the meeting minutes and financial records of the Friendly Home, an aftercare program that provided domestic services training for discharged girls; the reports of Camp Wehaha for Girls -- a summer camp and Edenwald - a special home designed to train mentally retarded children to manage their daily activities. Both Camp Wehaha for Girls and Edenwald were extended facilities built by HOA in upstate New York to provide additional child-care services to the orphanage children.

[See also: Series I: HOA Administrative Records, Subseries A: HOA annual reports, President's reports, the constitutions and by-laws of the Hebrew Benevolent Society and HOA; Subseries B: Meeting minutes of Board of Trustees, Executive Committee, Board of Directors]

BoxFolderTitleDate
10 1 (Boarding) Committee Minutes, Reports, etc. 1930-1940
10 2 Camp Wehaha Report December 30, 1924
10 3 Committee on Dowry Fund - Records and Minutes (bound) 1895-1907
10 4 Committee on Orphans' Estates, Life Insurance, and Bequests-Minutes (bound) 1871-1884
10 5 Edenwald Playground 1941
10 6 Edenwald Report - "An Experiment in Education" 1929
BoxFolderTitleDate
11 1 Friendly Home: Monthly Disbursements December 1919-December 1929
11 2 Friendly Home: Monthly Reports January 1930-March 1936
11 3 Friendly Home: Monthly Reports March 1936-April 1940
11 4 Girls' Home Club Certificate of Incorporation July 3, 1928
11 5 Medical Affairs Committee Material undated, 1932, 1940-1941
11 6 (Unknown committee) Meeting Minutes September 1, 1879
11 7 Widows' Pension Fund (prepared by the Executive Committee of HOA) 1913, 1919

Subseries D: Children's records, undated, 1860-1942, 1964, 1970-1974, 1977-1978, 1985, 2004-2007

English.
Boxes 12-47.
Arrangement:

Arranged into four subsubseries.

Scope and Content:

Subseries D is grouped into four subsubseries to better reflect the diverse sources of the documents. The records include children's applications, admission and discharge records, medical records, and conduct books. Since the records contain very crucial personal information, later records may be restricted due to privacy. However, the series is a good source for interested parties and the orphanage children's family members to conduct their genealogical searches to trace their family history.

Subsubseries i: Records of applications, admission and discharge records, and public school records, undated, 1860-1942

English.
Boxes 12-41.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subsubseries i contains indexes of the children's names, their parents' personal and family background information, and occasionally the reasons for the children's admittance and rejections. Admission and discharge ledgers list the nativity of the applicant and parents, family size, health details and surrounding circumstances. The records entitled "Relief Books" refer to children's discharge records, and may list who they were discharged to.

[See also: Series I: Administrative records, Suberies D: Children's records, Subsubseries ii: Medical Records; Subsubseries iii: Children's conduct records; Subsubseries iv: Student Publications; Subseries I: State / City government records (in relation to HOA)]

BoxFolderTitleDate
12 1 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1871-1875
12 2 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1875-1879
BoxFolderTitleDate
13 1 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1887-1893
BoxFolderTitleDate
14 1 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1901-1903
14 2 Applications for Admission to Orphanage May 7, 1902
14 3 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1903-1905
14 4 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1905-1906
BoxFolderTitleDate
15 1 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1906-1907
15 2 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1907-1908
15 3 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1909-1911
BoxFolderTitleDate
16 1 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1911-1912
16 2 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1912-1914
16 3 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1914-1915
BoxFolderTitleDate
17 1 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1915-1917
17 2 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1917-1920
17 3 Applications for Admission (bound) [Microfilmed] 1921-1924
BoxFolderTitleDate
18 1 Admissions and Discharges (bound) [Microfilmed] 1862-1884
18 2 Admissions and Discharges (bound) [Microfilmed] 1864-1869
18 3 Admissions and Discharges 1874, 1876, 1889-1894
BoxFolderTitleDate
19 (OS2) 1 Admissions and Discharges (bound) [Microfilmed] 1884-1907
BoxFolderTitleDate
20 (OS2) 1 Admissions and Discharges (bound) [Microfilmed] 1891-1918
BoxFolderTitleDate
21 (OS1) 2 Admission and Discharges (bound) [Microfilmed] 1892-1901
BoxFolderTitleDate
22 (OS1) 1 Admissions and Discharges (bound) 1936-1941
BoxFolderTitleDate
23 1 Admissions Statistics 1903-1926
23 2 (Discharge Records) Three discharge papers (loose): Morris Adler, Hyman Ratner, Hyman Thorner [Microfilmed] October 5, 1904
23 3 Discharge Records (2 bound) [Microfilmed] 1899-1906
23 4 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1909-1910
23 5 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1910-1911
BoxFolderTitleDate
24 1 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1911-1912
24 2 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1912-1913
24 3 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1913
24 4 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1913-1914
BoxFolderTitleDate
25 1 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1914-1915
25 2 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1915-1916
25 3 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1916-1917
BoxFolderTitleDate
26 1 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1917-1918
26 2 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1918
26 3 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1918-1919
26 4 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1919-1920
BoxFolderTitleDate
27 1 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1920-1922
27 2 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1922
BoxFolderTitleDate
28 1 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1922-1924
BoxFolderTitleDate
29 1 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1924-1926
29 2 Discharge Records (bound) [Microfilmed] 1926-1928
BoxFolderTitleDate
30 1 Discharge Records (bound) 1928-1930
30 2 Discharge Records (bound) 1931-1932
BoxFolderTitleDate
31 1 Discharge Records (bound) 1932-1933
31 2 Discharge Records (bound) 1933
BoxFolderTitleDate
32 1 Discharge Records (bound) 1933-1934
32 2 Discharge Records (bound) 1934-1935
BoxFolderTitleDate
33 1 Discharge Records (bound) 1935-1936
BoxFolderTitleDate
34 1 Discharge Records (bound) 1936-1938
BoxFolderTitleDate
35 1 Discharge Records (bound) 1938-1940
BoxFolderTitleDate
36(OS1) 1 Friendly Home Admission and Discharges (bound) [Microfilmed. Dates after 1925 are restricted for privacy reasons] 1916-1941
36(OS1) 2 Friendly Home, Edenwald, and Temporary Discharges (bound) [Microfilmed. Dates after 1925 are restricted for privacy reasons] 1916-1930
BoxFolderTitleDate
37(OS1) 1 HOA After-Care Department (bound) 1912-1942
BoxFolderTitleDate
38 1 Index of Children [Microfilmed] 1860-1900
38 2 Index of Names in Children's Register [Microfilmed] undated
38 3 (Public School Detention Book) Index of Children [Microfilmed] 1879-1883
38 4 Public School Detention Book 1879-1884
BoxFolderTitleDate
39(OS1) 1 Public School Student Records (bound) 1884-1892
BoxFolderTitleDate
40(OS1) 1 Register of Visitors to Inmates (bound) 1904-1905
BoxFolderTitleDate
41(OS1) 1 Relief Book (discharge records) (bound) 1904-1906
41(OS1) 2 Relief Book (discharge records) (bound) 1905-1907

Subsubseries ii: Medical Records, 1916-1925, 1933, 1935-1941

English.
Box 42 - Box 44, Folder 1.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subsubseries ii contains summaries of children's treatments and their medical histories; in cases of serious illness the child was transferred to Mt. Sinai Hospital. This subsubseries also includes a report on the intelligence test results conducted by HOA psychologists that charts children's mental development and a study of the children's infectious diseases.

[See also: Series I: Administrative records, Subseries D: Children's records, Subsubseries i: Children's applications, admission and discharge records, and public school records; iii: Children's conduct records; Subseries iv: Student Publications, Subseries I: State / City government records (in relation to HOA)]

BoxFolderTitleDate
42 1 Institutional Journal of Infectious Diseases (bound) 1916-1925
42 2 Intelligence Test Results (a report) 1922, 1933
42 3 Medical Records (bound) 1935
42 4 Medical Records (bound) 1936
42 5 Medical Records (bound) 1937
BoxFolderTitleDate
43 1 Medical Records (bound) 1938
43 2 Medical Records (bound) 1939
43 3 Medical Records (bound) 1940
BoxFolderTitleDate
44(OS1) 1 Medical Records (bound) (recently added) 1941

Subsubseries iii: Children's conduct records, 1872-1875, 1877-1884, 1891-1899

English.
Box 44, Folder 2 - Box 46.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subsubseries iii contains four bound ledgers that list orphanage children's conduct records that were entered by their teachers and wardens. The conduct records, some of which were daily entered, others on a monthly basis, include suggestions for improvements.

[See also: Series 1: Administrative records, Subseries D: Children's records, Subsubseries i: Children's applications, admission and discharge records, and public school records; Subsubseries ii: Medical Records; Subsubseries iv: Student Publications, Subseries I: State / City government records (in relation to HOA)]

BoxFolderTitleDate
44(OS1) 2 (Conduct book) Discharges (?) (bound) [Microfilmed] 1872-1875
BoxFolderTitleDate
45(OS1) 1 Conduct Book (bound) 1877-1884
BoxFolderTitleDate
46(OS1) 1 Conduct Book (bound) 1878-1881
46(OS1) 2 Conduct Book (bound) 1891-1899

Subsubseries iv: Student Publications, undated, 1913, 1925-1933, 1941, 1964, 1970-1974, 1977-1978, 1985, 2004-

English.
Box 47.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subsubseries iv includes the enduring student publication titled Rising Bell. Rising Bell was first published in 1919 as a student magazine solely managed and published by the orphanage children. Published quarterly, the magazine contained essays, poems, journals, and children's drawings. The magazine was regarded as an ideas exchange place for the children. After HOA merged with the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society (HSGS) to form the New York Association for Jewish Children in the early 1940s, Rising Bell became an alumni publication. Today, alumni publish it quarterly. Subsubseries iv also holds an issue of an early student publication, "OUR LITTLE WORLD" (1913) and an undated alumni memoir.

[See also: Series I: Administrative records, Subseries D: Children's records, Subsubseries i: Children's applications, admission and discharge records, and public school records; Subsubseries ii: Medical Records; iii: Children's conduct records, Subseries I: State / City government records (in relation to HOA)]

BoxFolderTitleDate
47 1 Memoirs of an Inmate (fragment) undated
47 2 Our Little World September 1913
47 3 Rising Bell 1925-1927, 1929
47 4 Rising Bell 1925, 1931, 1933
47 5 Rising Bell (bound) 1927-1932
47 6 Rising Bell 1930, 1933
47 7 Rising Bell 1941
47 8 Rising Bell 1964, 1970-1974, 1977-1978, 1985, 2004-

Subseries E: HOA Financial records including annual, monthly financial reports, ledgers, estate accounts, etc., 1855-1933

English.
Boxes 48-55, Box 56, Folders 1-4.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subseries E contains annual financial statements, "expense books" which were records of children's monthly expenses, official monthly accounts, and investment accounts.

BoxFolderTitleDate
48 1 Auditor's Accounts (contains oversized material) 1915-1924
48 2 Expense Book (bound) 1855-1878
BoxFolderTitleDate
49 1 Expense Book (bound) 1878-1896
49 2 Expense Book (bound) 1892-1897
49 3 Expense Book (bound) 1895-1900
49 4 Expense Book (bound) 1897-1898
BoxFolderTitleDate
50(OS1) 1 Financial Accounts (bound) 1874-1894
50(OS1) 2 Financial Accounts (bound) 1895-1930
50(OS1) 3 Financial Accounts (bound) 1900-1902
50(OS1) 4 Financial Accounts (bound) 1900-1906
BoxFolderTitleDate
51(OS1) 1 Financial Ledger (bound) 1895-1913
BoxFolderTitleDate
52 1 Funds, Accounts, and Investment Accounts (bound) 1921-1926
52 2 HOA Finance Committee Report December 19, 1875
52 3 Ledgers of Students [Microfilmed] 1902-1905
52 4 Monthly Financial Reports 1926-1929
52 5 Mortgages, Volume 1 (bound) 1902-1924
52 6 Mortgages, Volume 2 (bound) 1925-1926
BoxFolderTitleDate
53(OS1) 1 Orphans' Estate (Accounts) Ledger circa 1886-1903
BoxFolderTitleDate
54(OS1) 1 Orphans' Estate (Accounts) Ledger 1906-1908
BoxFolderTitleDate
55(OS1) 1 Orphans' Estates and Life Insurance Record Book (bound) 1874-1902
BoxFolderTitleDate
56 1 Orphans' Savings Accounts (bound) 1912-1933
56 2 Treasurer's Reports 1908-1933
56 3 Trial Balances 1915
56 4 Yearly Treasurer's Report 1927

Subseries F: HOA property records, undated, 1876, 1880-1896, 1898, 1902-1904, 1906, 1910-1926, 1941-1944, 1958, 1965

English.
Box 56, Folders 5-7; Box 57; Box 58, Folders 1-8; MAP2 Folder 1.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subseries F consists of property related documents, including the architectural floor plan of the orphanage on Amsterdam Avenue, the building specifications of HOA's early orphanage site, lease agreements, various stages of the orphanage's expansion plans, and the sales records of the orphanage site to New York City in 1943.

BoxFolderTitleDate
56 5 (Amsterdam Avenue) Property - Cornerstone Laying Invitation (photocopy) 1883
56 6 (Amsterdam Avenue) Broadway Property - Memorial Plaque (Dedication) 1958
56 7 (Amsterdam Avenue) Broadway Property - Sale of 1941-1943
BoxFolderTitleDate
57 1 (Amsterdam Avenue) Broadway Property - Sale of 1943-1944
57 2 Appraisal of Properties December 9, 1902
57 3 Architects' Brief for 10th Avenue Building circa 1880s
57 4 Assessment Liens September 27, 1884
57 5 Bond Purchase Lists and Correspondence undated, 1881
57 6 Building Specifications 1882-1890
57 7 Consent for Railway May 16, 1898
57 8 Identifications for Estate Purposes 1903-1904, 1906
57 9 Lease Agreement July 7, 1882
57 10 Lists of Mortgages Held 1876, 1902
57 11 New Building - Building Fund Correspondence and Resolutions Plan and Scope Committee undated, 1910-1924
57 12 New Building - Building Fund Solicitation undated, 1916
57 13 New Building - Building Fund Subscribers undated, 1915-1926
BoxFolderTitleDate
58 1 New Building - Department of Public Works' Permission for Construction June 4, 1884
58 2 New Building Floor Plans (Oversized item. See Box 84 (OS2), Folder 5) circa 1919
58 3 New Building - Payments to Contractors 1919-1921
58 4 New Building - Plans for New Building 1919
58 5 New Building - Plans for New Building undated, 1920-1923
58 6 Papers regarding Real Estate Holdings (contains oversized material) 1881, 1895-1896, 1903-1904, 1925, 1965
BoxFolderTitleDate
MAP2 1 Plots and Deeds undated, 1881-1942
BoxFolderTitleDate
58 7 Property Map undated
58 8 Property Transferal September 14, 1895

Subseries G: Donation / Bequest records, 1870-1972

English.
Box 58, Folder 9 - Box 66.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subseries G contains bound volumes of members' donation records titled Donation Book, Membership Book, and Proposition Book; as well as estate books such as a Memorial Book and Legacies and Bequests.

BoxFolderTitleDate
58 9 Bonds Returned and Donated to HOA (bound) 1883-1895
BoxFolderTitleDate
59(OS1) 1 Donation Book (bound) 1870-1907
59(OS1) 2 Donation Book (Oversized item. See Box 84 (OS2), Folder 2) 1870-1918
BoxFolderTitleDate
60 1 Legacies and Bequests (bound) 1885-1898
60 2 Legacies and Bequests (bound) 1902-1926
BoxFolderTitleDate
61(OS2) 1 Membership Book (bound) 1895-1899
61(OS2) 2 Membership Book (bound) 1905-1919
61(OS2) 3 Membership Book (bound) (HOA Proposition Book) 1914-1929
BoxFolderTitleDate
62 (OS1) 1 Memorial Book (bound) 1874-1908
BoxFolderTitleDate
63 1 Memorial Book (bound) 1905-1972
BoxFolderTitleDate
64 1 Proposition Book for Patrons and Members of the Hebrew Benevolent and Orphan Asylum (bound) 1881-1892
64 2 Proposition Book for Patrons and Members of the Hebrew Benevolent and Orphan Asylum (bound) 1892-1905
64 3 Abrahams, Ludolph 1936
64 4 Ast, William B. 1930
64 5 Ballin, Sydney 1934-1935, 1937
64 6 Barnet, Alvina 1930-1931, 1933
64 7 Bernheimer, Leopold A. 1932-1933
64 8 Bondy, Sophie 1927, 1929-1930
64 9 Brill, William 1938
64 10 Carr, Herbert J. 1931-1934
64 11 Cohen, Minnie 1930-1931
BoxFolderTitleDate
65 1 Cohn, Abraham 1934-1936
65 2 Coleman, Amy H. 1938-1939
65 3 Colten, Louise C. 1934-1936
65 4 Connolly, Anna C. 1935-1936
65 5 Corwin, Robert 1936-1937
65 6 Croll, Henry L. 1938-1939
65 7 Demuth, Irene L. 1931
65 8 Dessauer, Minnie 1934
65 9 Dittman, Charles 1933
65 10 Dolgoff, James L. 1930-1932, 1938-1939
65 11 Drey, Morris 1938-1939
65 12 Einstein, Carrie 1931-1932
65 13 Eisenberg, Harry 1935, 1937-1938
65 14 Epstein, Levi 1937
65 15 Fishbein, Pincus 1934
65 16 Frank, Louis 1933
65 17 Frankel, Sol 1934-1935
65 18 Friedsam, Michael 1930-1932
65 19 Fry, Isaac 1929, 1931-1932, 1934, 1936, 1938-1939
65 20 Galante, Louis D. 1937
65 21 Garland, Lillian B. 1930-1933
65 22 Geissman, Leopold 1929-1930
65 23 Goldschmidt, Bernhardt 1936-1937
65 24 Grifenhagen, Max S. 1932-1935
65 25 Guggenheim, Carrie 1933, 1936
65 26 Gunther, Emma 1929-1931
BoxFolderTitleDate
66 1 Gutman, Jacob W. 1936-1937
66 2 Halpern, Irving 1933
66 3 Harrison, Abraham 1927-1929, 1931, 1933
66 4 Hervey, Martha G. 1934-1935
66 5 Isaacs, George G. 1939
66 6 Jacobs, Matilda 1937
66 7 Jacobs, Ralph J. 1937
66 8 Jacoby, Henry 1937-1939
66 9 Kasof, Esther 1929-1930
66 10 Klein, Isidor 1931
66 11 Klingenstein, Charles 1938
66 12 Kohn, Sol 1931-1932
66 13 Korn, Isidore S. 1935
66 14 Korndorfer, Jacob 1919
66 15 Langsdorf, Helen R. 1932-1933
66 16 Langsdorf, Sigmund 1926-1927
66 17 Laufer, Selma 1929
66 18 Lauterbach, Helen 1933
66 19 Lehman, Carrie L. 1937
66 20 Levitt, Jacob 1927, 1930-1931
66 21 Levy, Ephraim B. 1935, 1937
66 22 Levy, Jacob K. 1928, 1930
66 23 Levy, Louis A. 1929-1931
66 24 Levy, Samuel H. 1927-1928
66 25 Lewis, Alexander 1932, 1937-1938
66 26 Lewis, Edith R. 1932-1933
66 27 Lewy, Solomon (Sol) 1928-1929
66 28 Liberman, Isaac 1928-1930
66 29 Libman, Solomon 1924-1925, 1929
66 30 Liebmann, Henrietta 1928-1929
66 31 Louis, Charles H. 1931, 1934
66 32 Low, Sophie W. 1922, 1925, 1927
66 33 Lundell, Clara 1937
66 34 Lurie, Morris 1932-1933

Subseries H: HOA publications and programs, including library bulletins, school songs, undated, 1883, 1904-1905, 1908, 1910, 1914-1919, 1921-1922, 1925, 1927-1932, 1941

English.
Box 67.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Unlike the Student Publications subsubseries iv, which contains student journals such as Rising Bell, Subseries H consists of publications prepared by HOA. These publications include library bulletins, anniversary celebration booklets or Souvenir Booklets (memorial booklets), and official invitations and programs.

BoxFolderTitleDate
67 1 50th Anniversary Celebration 1910
67 2 100th Anniversary Celebration 1922
67 3 Chronicle of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum 1904
67 4 Concerts, Celebrations, and Dances undated, 1927-1932
67 5 Edward Lauterbach Library 1921
67 6 Farewell Dinner 1941
67 7 Invitations and Programs 1883, 1908, 1910, 1922, 1925, 1928, 1931-1932
67 8 Library Bulletin 1914-1919
67 9 Memorial Booklets 1905, 1910, 1922
67 10 Previous Index to Collection (cards) - 1 of 2 undated
67 11 Previous Index to Collection (cards) - 2 of 2 undated
67 12 Scenes in the Daily Life of an Orphan Child undated
67 13 School Songs undated
67 14 Souvenir Booklet 1922

Subseries I: State / City government records (in relation to HOA), undated, 1878, 1916, 1919-1934

English.
Box 68.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Subseries I includes briefs and acts of assembly related to child's welfare, correspondence and lists of children (first names only) with admission and discharge dates utilized by the Department of Health for a statistical study, a 1916 government inspection report, and lists of deaths kept by the Surrogates Office.

[See also: Series I: Administrative records, Subseries D: Children's records, Subsubseries i: Children's applications, admission and discharge records, and public school records; Subsubseries ii: Medical Records; iii: Children's conduct records; Subsubseries iv: Student Publications]

BoxFolderTitleDate
68 1 Acts of Assembly (NY State) January 10, 1923-February 8, 1923
68 2 Briefs on Behalf of an Act July 1, 1923
68 3 Department of Health - Admissions and Discharge Records 1919-1933
68 4 Department of Health - Correspondence 1934
68 5 HOA v. Mayor of New York et al January 17, 1878
68 6 Report of General Inspection of HOA 1916
68 7 Surrogates Office in re Deaths undated
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Series II: The Records of HOA Affiliated Associations, undated, 1871, 1876-1882, 1886-1929, 1932-1962, 1964, 1966, 1996

English.
Boxes 69-78, 82.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Series II demonstrates the collaborations between HOA and its affiliated associations in working to provide urgently needed child-care services to the massive influx of Jewish immigrants from Eastern European countries at the turn of the twentieth century. The series is divided into six subseries: Subseries A: The records of the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropies and related organizations; Subseries B: Ladies Sewing Society; Subseries C: Emmanuel Lehman Fund; Subseries D: Seligman Solomon Society; Subseries E: Academy Alumni Association; and Subseries F: H.O.A. Association.

Subseries A: The records of the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropies and related organizations, undated, 1871, 1911-1916, 1920, 1922, 1924-1925, 1937, 1939-1940, 1943

English.
Boxes 69, 70, Folders 1-3.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

HOA was among the first organizations to join the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropies upon its creation in 1917. The Federation was established in order to centralize the fundraising activities among its members. Since its founding, Federation had commissioned numerous child-care studies to strengthen Jewish welfare services. Some of these studies were targeted at the Jewish orphanage children and had an incisive impact on HOA operating directions. Subseries A includes a 1922 child-care report published by the Committee on Child Care Study of the Federation that recommended childcare institutions to shift its policy from in-house care to foster care. HOA quickly embraced its recommendation. Two years after Herman W. Block, chairman of the Federation's Committee on Child Care, delivered his address entitled "The New York Jewish Child-Care Situation" (1937), HOA merged its after-care department with that of HSGS Fellowship House to streamline their after-care services.

In addition to the Federation's child-care studies, Subseries A contains three folders of material that details HOA's long reciprocal relationship with Mt. Sinai Hospital; a relationship that led to the establishment of a special ward by Mt. Sinai Hospital for the emergency treatments of HOA's children free of charge for more than a hundred years.

BoxFolderTitleDate
69 1 Boarding Bureau (from Federation) 1920
69 2 Committee on Child Care Study - Meeting Minutes (from Federation) 1922
69 3 Committee on Child Care Study-Reports - 1 of 2 (from Federation) 1922
69 4 Committee on Child Care Study-Reports - 2 of 2 (from Federation) 1922
69 5 Federation Building Fund - Committee Report, clippings undated, 1920
69 6 Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropies undated, 1916
69 7 Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropies - Budget (Oversized item. See Box 84 (OS2), Folder 3) 1924
69 8 Figures for Federation Statistics undated, 1911-1915
69 9 Junior Federation (from Federation) 1925
69 10 (Re: Mt. Sinai Hospital) Agreement with Mt. Sinai Hospital for Orphans' Ward March 20, 1871
69 11 (Re: Mt. Sinai Hospital) Subscription Records for an Emergency Hospital (bound) [Microfilmed] undated
69 12 (Re: Previous agreement with Mt. Sinai Hospital) Merger with New York Association for Jewish Children April 8-9, 1940
BoxFolderTitleDate
70 1 New York Association for Jewish Children - Report and clippings 1939-1940, 1943
70 2 "The New York Jewish Child-Care Situation" address delivered by Herman W. Block (from Federation / National Council) January 28, 1937
70 3 Proposed Plan of After-Care Department and HSGS Fellowship House Merger 1939

Subseries B: Ladies' Sewing Society, undated, 1876-1882, 1893-1928, 1932-1940

English.
Boxes 70, Folders 4-13, 71.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Found in 1861, the Ladies' Sewing Society helped girls adjust to HOA and trained them in household work. As enrollment swelled, the Society also provided counseling and after-care services for recent female graduates, by managing the Friendly Home for Girls. Subseries B includes annual reports, meeting minutes, financial records, and membership and donation records.

BoxFolderTitleDate
70 4 Ladies' Sewing Society Annual Reports 1893-1914
70 5 Ladies' Sewing Society Ballots and Committee Lists 1918-1928
70 6 Ladies' Sewing Society - Board of Directresses 1939-1940
70 7 Ladies' Sewing Society - Budgets (Oversized item. See Box 84 (OS2), Folder 4) 1926-1927
70 8 Ladies' Sewing Society Correspondence undated, 1916-1917, 1922
70 9 Ladies' Sewing Society Donations 1911-1916
70 10 Ladies' Sewing Society - Friendly Home for Girls 1926
70 11 Ladies' Sewing Society Membership 1917
70 12 Ladies' Sewing Society - Minutes 1914-1922
70 13 Ladies' Sewing Society - Minutes 1932-1940
BoxFolderTitleDate
71(OS1) 1 Ladies' Sewing Society - (National Monthly Due Ledger) Accounts (bound) 1914-1922
71(OS1) 2 Ladies' Sewing Society - Record of Members (bound) 1876-1882

Subseries C: Emmanuel Lehman Fund, 1887-1922

English.
Boxes 72-75.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Founded by Emmanuel Lehman, an executive board member, the Emmanuel Lehman Industrial and Provident Fund provided scholarships in vocational training. Subseries C contains minutes and financial records. Please note that a photograph album of an exhibition to demonstrate the Fund's achievements is located in Series VI: Portraits and Photographs.

[See also Series VI. Box 82 for Photograph album]

BoxFolderTitleDate
72(OS1) 1 (Accounts) Book of Receipts (bound) circa 1898-circa 1905
BoxFolderTitleDate
73 1 (Accounts) Receipts and Disbursements (bound) 1903-1911
73 2 Census (bound) 1897-1921
73 3 Committee Minutes (bound) 1905-1909
BoxFolderTitleDate
74(OS1) 1 Committee Minutes (bound) 1909-1922
BoxFolderTitleDate
75 1 Financial Ledgers (bound) 1897-1915
75 2 Financial Ledgers (bound) 1897-1921
75 3 Mortgages and Investments (bound) 1897-1903

Subseries D: Seligman Solomon Society, 1886, 1889-1890, 1892-1893, 1898-1899, 1901-1902, 1904, 1929, 1934, 1937-1938, 1941, 1948, 1950, 1952-1953, 1955-1956

English.
Boxes 76-77, 78, Folders 1-2.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

An alumni association founded by executive board member Mr. Seligman Solomon in the late 1890s, the Seligman Solomon Society also served as an early follow up between graduated children and HOA board members. Subseries D includes a constitution and by-laws, invitations, newsletters, and souvenir journals.

(See also: )

BoxFolderTitleDate
76 1 Beach Party Invitation 1892
76 2 Constitution and By-Laws 1898, 1915, 1922, 1934
76 3 Organizing Circular 1886
76 4 Souvenir Journals 1889-1890, 1892-1893, 1899, 1901-1902, 1904-1906
76 5 Souvenir Journals 1907-1911
76 6 Souvenir Journals 1912-1914
76 7 Souvenir Journals 1916-1919
76 8 Souvenir Journals 1920-1922
BoxFolderTitleDate
77 1 Souvenir Journals 1923-1924
77 2 Souvenir Journals 1925
77 3 Souvenir Journals 1926-1928
77 4 Souvenir Journals 1929, 1937, 1941
77 5 Souvenir Journals 1948-1950, 1952-1953, 1955
BoxFolderTitleDate
78 1 S.S.S. Booster and Alumni News October 1938
78 2 S.S.S. Bulletin October 1956

Subseries E: Academy Alumni Association, undated, 1939-1952, 1954

English.
Box 78, Folders 3-11.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

When the Seligman Solomon Society declined to accept newcomers in the late 1910s, later graduates founded the Academy Alumni Association (AAA) in 1939. During WWII, the Association sent packages and regular bulletins to alumni serving on the front line of duties.

BoxFolderTitleDate
78 3 Academy Alumni Bulletin 1942-1944
78 4 Academy Alumni Bulletin 1944-1945
78 5 Academy Alumni Bulletin 1946-1947, 1949-1952
78 6 Academy Alumni News 1939-1941
78 7 Academy Press Release 1939
78 8 Alumni Serving in World War II 1941-1945
78 9 By-Laws undated
78 10 Programs, Invitations, etc. undated, 1939-1952
78 11 Souvenir Journals 1946, 1951-1952, 1954

Subseries F: H.O.A. Association, 1957-1962, 1964, 1966, 1996

English.
Box 78, Folders 12-15.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

The Seligman Solomon Society and the Academy Alumni Association merged in 1957 to become the H.O.A. Association in order to streamline resources and services. Subseries F includes the bulletin titled Dinner, issued for the annual reunion, and its official publication, the H.O.A. Association Bulletin.

(See also: Series I: HOA Administrative Records, Subseries D: Children's records, Subsubseries iv: Children's publications, for recent issues of Rising Bell)

BoxFolderTitleDate
78 12 Dinners 1957-1960
78 13 Dinners 1962, 1964, 1966, 1996
78 14 H.O.A. Association Bulletin 1959, 1961
78 15 Memorial Plaque at (Amsterdam Avenue) Broadway Property 1958
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Series III: Correspondence, undated, 1884, 1886, 1891, 1896, 1898-1900, 1904-1906, 1908-1916, 1918-1923, 1925, 1928-1929

English and German.
Boxes 79, 80, Folders 1-2.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Series III holds correspondence between HOA, other Jewish welfare organizations, and government agencies. The majority of the correspondence relates to funding requests and child-care services. The series also includes invitations for anniversary celebrations, special fundraising events, and student performances.

BoxFolderTitleDate
79 1 100th Anniversary Correspondence 1922
79 2 Annual Meeting Acceptances and Declinations 1916
79 3 Correspondence - General 1884, 1886, 1896, 1898-1900, 1904-1906
79 4 Correspondence - General undated, 1906, 1908-1910, 1912-1915, 1919, 1922
  (contains German)   
79 5 Correspondence - General undated, 1909-1912
79 6 Correspondence - General undated, 1912-1916
79 7 Correspondence - General 1918, 1920
  (contains German)   
79 8 Correspondence - Jewish Children's Clearing Bureau: April 22, 1922 1922
79 9 Correspondence on Commitment to Hebrew Orphan Asylum 1919, 1922
79 10 Correspondence - Solomon Lowenstein to Judge Newburger November 28, 1910
79 11 Correspondence - Superintendent to Samuel Ullman 1922
79 12 Letters regarding testimonial 1891
79 13 Payne-Wile Controversy - 1 of 3 1928-1929
79 14 Payne-Wile Controversy - 2 of 3 1929
79 15 Payne-Wile Controversy - 3 of 3 1929
79 16 Responses to Inauguration Invitation for October 23, 1884 1884
79 17 Robert P. Green Correspondence (includes S. Wise correspondence) 1921-1923
BoxFolderTitleDate
80 1 Thomas Jefferson Memorial Fund Correspondence undated, 1925
80 2 Thomas Jefferson Memorial Fund Receipts, Clippings, Deposits undated, 1925
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Series IV: Dedications / Speeches, undated, 1910, 1915, 1917, 1922, 1927-1928

English.
Box 80, Folders 3-12.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Series IV includes testimonials, speeches, and dedications for various occasions, including a speech by Maurice Simmons to the Cadet Corps, testimonials by the Brooklyn Hebrew Orphan Asylum and others organizations, a testimonial to "the father of pediatrics" Dr. Abraham Jacobi, and dedications for a U.S.S. Maine Memorial tablet and the opening of Warner Gymnasium.

BoxFolderTitleDate
80 3 Address by Maurice Simmons to Cadet Corps November 24, 1910
80 4 Speech (untitled) undated
80 5 Testimonial from United Hebrew Benevolent Association of Boston undated
80 6 Testimonial from Widowed Mothers Fund Association February 17, 1917
80 7 Testimonial to Dr. Abraham Jacobi undated
80 8 Testimonial to HOA from Brooklyn HOA (Oversized item. See Box 84 (OS2), Folder 7) 1922
80 9 U.S.S. Maine Memorial Tablet February 14, 1915
80 10 Warner Gymnasium - Correspondence in re Dedication 1928
80 11 Warner Gymnasium - Dedication Programs 1928
80 12 Warner Gymnasium - Construction and Dedication 1927-1928
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Series V: HOA Histories and Studies, undated, 1832-1960, 1966

English.
Box 81.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Series V includes two research papers on HOA written by graduate students, a few child-care reports based on HOA research findings, a government survey on child-care institutions in 1910 (titled Benevolent Institutions), and draft versions of HOA histories.

BoxFolderTitleDate
81 1 An Experimental Kindergarten for Children of Primary School Age April 1932
81 2 Benevolent Institutions (bound) 1910
81 3 Extracts from unsigned article in re HOA 1895
81 4 Histories (includes typescripts of early minutes) (contains oversized material) undated, 1832-1960
81 5 Histories of the HOA undated
81 6 Historical Studies (Graduate School Theses) 1938, 1966
81 7 Studies: "Social Case Work After the Discharge from the Institution" 1935
81 8 Studies: "Social Development of Children in Institutions" February 6, 1935
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Series VI: Portraits and Photographs, undated, 1890, 1901, 1904, 1910, 1912, 1920s-1930s, 1949

Boxes 82, 83, Folders 1-13.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Series VI contains two boxes of photographs. The first box includes a photograph album of Seligman Solomon Society's exhibition photographs. The second box consists of undated portraits of various executive board directors and members, as well as a few folders of children's photographs recording their daily activities and fun times in HOA and summer camps.

(See also: Hyman Bogen collection, P-767)

BoxFolderTitleDate
82 (OS1) 1 Emmanuel Lehman Fund (Photograph Album) (bound) 1901
BoxFolderTitleDate
83 1 (Frenkel, Emil? and Theo. Obermeyer) Unidentified Photographs undated
83 2 HOA Photograph 1890
83 3 Newburger, J E. (photograph) undated
83 4 (Ottinger, Marx?, Theodore Rosenwald, Jack Dryfoos, and unidentified) portraits undated, 1904, 1910
83 5 Spiegelberg Portrait undated
83 6 (Stern, Louis) Unidentified Man (3 photos) undated
83 7 Sylvan Stix Workshop (Photograph Album) (Oversized item. See Box 84 (OS2), Folder 6) 1949
83 8 Photographs - Academy and Camps 1920s-1930s
83 9 Photographs - Camp Wehawa 1922
83 10 Photographs - Camp circa 1939
83 11 Photographs / Illustrations - Miscellaneous undated
83 12 Photographs - "Photograph of Clients" 1912
83 13 Unidentified Portrait undated
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Series VII: News Clippings and Miscellaneous Items, 1884-1885, 1890, 1904

English.
Box 83, Folders 14-18.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically, and then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Series VII contains news clippings about HOA, including obituaries for Herman Baar, HOA superintendent, who passed away in 1904, and some miscellaneous items.

BoxFolderTitleDate
83 14 Affidavit of Isaac Marx February 4, 1885
83 15 Dedication in Frank Leslie's Illustrated (Oversized item. See Box 84 (OS2), Folder 1) 1884
83 16 Obituaries for Hermann Baar (Superintendent, HOA) September 1904
83 17 Purim Gazette circa 1890
83 18 "The Hebrew Orphan Asylum" in Illustrated American July 26, 1890
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Separated Oversized Materials, 1870-1919, 1922, 1924, 1926-1927, 1949

English.
Box 84(OS2), Folders 1-7.
BoxFolderTitleDate
84(OS2) 1 Dedication in Frank Leslie's Illustrated (separated from Box 83, Folder 15) 1884
84(OS2) 2 Donation Book (separated from Box 59, Folder 2) 1870-1918
84(OS2) 3 Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropies - Budget (separated from Box 69, Folder 7) 1924
84(OS2) 4 Ladies' Sewing Society - Budgets (separated from Box 70, Folder 7) 1926-1927
84(OS2) 5 New Building Floor Plans (separated from Box 58, Folder 2) circa 1919
84(OS2) 6 Sylvan Stix Workshop (Photograph Album) (separated from Box 83, Folder 7) 1949
84(OS2) 7 Testimonial to HOA from Brooklyn HOA (separated from Box 80, Folder 8) 1922
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