Guide to the Records of the United Jewish Appeal-Federation of New York, 1909-2004
 
I-433

Processed by Susan Woodland, Eric Fritzler, Heather Halliday, Leah Edelman, Marvin Rusinek and Vital Zajka

American Jewish Historical Society

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 294-6160

Fax: (212) 294-6161

Email: reference@ajhs.org

URL: http://www.ajhs.org

© 2016, American Jewish Historical Society, Boston, MA and New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.
Machine-readable finding aid created by Susan Woodland as MS Word document, September 2015. Finding aid was encoded by Marvin Rusinek on September 25, 2015. Description is in English.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: United Jewish Appeal--Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York
Title: United Jewish Appeal--Federation of New York collection
Dates:1909-2004
Abstract: United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York is the organization that resulted from the mergers of various New York federations with the New York office of UJA. UJA-Federation and its predecessor organizations have been a central force for communal planning and philanthropy in the New York Jewish community since 1917, and in overseas Jewish communities since 1939. The largest section of this collection covers the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies and its predecessor organizations in Manhattan, the Bronx and Brooklyn. Important subject areas include Federation’s work with their affiliated agencies including detailed budget files through most of the 20th century; UJA’s programs in Israel and campaigns in New York during the 1960s and 1970s; an overview of the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign 1974-1986; and the day to day work of the successfully merged organizations 1986-2000.
Languages: The collection is primarily in English with some material in Yiddish.
Quantity: 2324.25 linear feet (2021 Bankers Boxes), 24 oversize boxes and 5 oversize folders
Identification: I-433
Repository: American Jewish Historical Society
Location: Located in AJHS New York, NY
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Historical Note
FJP minutes logo

Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Logo, circa 1950

In 1986, the merger of United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York with the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (“Federation”) resulted in the creation of one organization that exists “To ensure the continuity of the Jewish People, to enhance the quality of Jewish life and to build a strong and unified Jewish community – in New York, in Israel and throughout the world.”1

Beginning at the end of the 19th century the federation model was adopted by Jewish communal leaders around the country as a successful way to bring together affiliated social service agencies, consolidate their administrative functions, reduce duplication in services, raise funds efficiently and better serve the needs of the community. The Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City was formed in 1917.

In 1939, the leaders of three national Jewish organizations already involved with aiding Jewish refugees and immigrants formed United Jewish Appeal (UJA) in the days after Kristallnacht to combine efforts in aiding European Jews. By 1942 a local New York had office opened to solicit funds from the New York Jewish community. Eventually, by the early 1970s, it became clear that it would be more efficient to combine the local UJA and Federation campaigns. The UJA and Federation campaigns officially merged in 1974, and a final and complete merger of the two organizations occurred in 1986.

The combined organization at first maintained most of the existing organizational structure of both UJA and Federation: departments and committees continued the community services aspects of what had previously been Federation’s work with local agencies, and other departments and committees continued the overseas planning and programming in Israel and among Jewish communities in need around the world. Fundraising and campaigns, which had been merged in 1974, continued to raise funds in unified campaigns with one Distribution Committee allocating the funds according to a negotiated formula.

UJA-Federation has evolved through several strategic plans to adapt to a changing local Jewish community and a changing world. In 2015 its mission remains similar to what it was soon after the 1986 merger: “Through UJA-Federation of New York, you care for people in need, inspire a passion for Jewish life and learning, and strengthen communities in New York, in Israel, and around the world.”2

See the UJA-Federation of New York collection webpage for quick links to photographs, audio recordings and other digital objects, a timeline, an interactive map of Federation agencies, the archives project blog and this finding aid. Two other documents researchers may want to use as guides to names that are used in the finding aid:

A spreadsheet of professional staff, with information gleaned from the files about their work at UJA-Federation or its predecessors.

A spreadsheet of lay leaders from UJA-Federation and its predecessors.

Both spreadsheets are in draft form but may be helpful in identifying names of the many people associated with UJA-Federation from 1909 to 2000.

Footnotes

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Scope and Content Note

United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York is the organization that resulted after three mergers over the course of the 20th century. This collection incorporates the surviving historical records of the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities, the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York, the United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign and United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York.

The United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York collection is comprised of five subgroups:

Subgroup I: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies (FJP), 1909-1986. Found here are the files of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (FJP) and its predecessor organizations: the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies (1917-1944) and the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities (1909-1944). Approximately half of the entire collection consists of the records of FJP. The survival of hundreds of feet of files may be attributed to the records management acumen of Seymour J. Pomrenze, who worked as a consultant for FJP for several decades.

Subgroup II: United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York (UJA), bulk approximately 1930s-1986. The records of UJA from before the 1986 merger with FJP are scarce, but a snapshot of some departments will be found here. UJA files may exist elsewhere but it is unclear exactly where, if they exist at all, and were not part of this archive project. UJA before the merger therefore appears underrepresented in the collection.

Subgroup III: United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC), bulk approximately 1972-1986. Between about 1974 and 1986, FJP and UJA held joint campaigns; some records related to fundraising and the projects that were funded by the joint campaigns survive in the Joint Campaign subgroup.

Subgroup IV: United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF), bulk 1986-2000. These files date from the time of the merger in 1986 through about 2000, the end date for this archives project. Files more recent than 2000 are considered active and continue to be held by UJA-Federation; please contact the organization directly at contact@ujafedny.org in relation to information about the organization after 2000.

Subgroup V: Oral History Project, bulk 1981-2004. The Oral History Project was started by FJP and continued after the merger; it was an effort to capture an oral record of leaders from both UJA and Federation as well as individual affiliated agencies.

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Arrangement

To access the section of the finding aid for a specific subgroup, click on any of the links below. The UJA-Federation of New York collection is very large, and is arranged hierarchically. The outline below shows the 5 subgroups that are part of this collection. The individual subgroup sections of the finding aid will explain in detail the arrangement of each subgroup, will include detailed descriptions of the series and subseries, and will have links to the complete Container List to the collection, which can also be found in this downloadable Excel file.

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

The collection is open to all researchers by permission of the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society, except items that are restricted due to their fragility.

This finding aid is fully searchable by using your browser’s search function, or by using the control-F function.

Because of the size of the collection and of the finding aid, the actual box and folder lists are in a separate Container List, linked to this finding aid at the start of each Scope and Content Note at every level where folders exist, with this sentence:

The complete container list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Once you know which boxes you would like to request, click on the “Aeon Links” column to go directly to the box request form. You will need to be logged in as a reading room patron in order to request boxes. Please note: although each folder in the container list has a link, each box you want to see should be requested only one time. Material will be delivered on the box level only, not the folder level.

Alternatively, follow directions here for requesting boxes through the catalog: http://www.cjh.org/p/135

How to Use Container List: The Container List is a very large Excel spreadsheet. The first page you see when you click on the link to the Container List is a hierarchical outline for the entire collection. This outline links to each of the sheets in the spreadsheet, identified by tabs at the bottom. Please note that some subsubseries (or subseries, or subsubsubseries, etc.) are combined in one tab in the container list; the link in the outline will take you to the right sheet; you can search within the sheet to find the specific box you are looking for by using the control-F function.

To search the entire spreadsheet at one time (that is, to search every sheet), click control-F, then click on “options”, then set the “within” field to “workbook”. Because of limitations in Excel, you will need to set this to workbook every time you open the Container List and want to search the entire spreadsheet.

Please note that oversized materials, artifacts and folders in miscellaneous boxes that are pointed to in the finding aid or on folders are stored in-house; these materials do not need to be requested before your visit but can be requested as you need them.

Given the amount of archival materials, the collection (except for the oversize and miscellaneous boxes) is housed at an off-site storage location, within a climate and humidity controlled environment. Please be advised that you will need to request this material at least two (2) business days in advance to use any material in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room. Providing as much notice as possible before a visit would be helpful. Boxes can be requested through the box and folder listings in the Container List. For further information, please e-mail reference@ajhs.org.

Use Restrictions

Information concerning the literary rights may be obtained from the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society. Users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. For more information contact:
American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: reference@ajhs.org

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Related Materials

The UJA-Federation of New York website is periodically captured by the Internet Archive Wayback Machine, and as of 2015 includes snapshots from 2000 to 2015 that may include helpful information not included in the UJA-Federation collection itself. The snapshots can be viewed here: https://web.archive.org/web/*/https:/www.ujafedny.org. Please note that the Wayback Machine may not render the website exactly as it appeared on the live web at the time, and that AJHS has no control over how often the site was crawled or how it displays now.

There is a list of related collections on the collection webpage.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:
Identification of item, date (if known); United Jewish Appeal--Federation of New York collection; I-433; box number; folder number; American Jewish Historical Society, New York, NY, and Boston, MA.

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Acquisition Note

United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York, Inc. donation through deed of gift, 2011. Originally 3232 bankers boxes; after processing, the total is 2021 bankers boxes, 24 oversize boxes and 5 oversize folders.

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Processing Information

The United Jewish Appeal-Federation of New York Collection has been minimally processed at the folder level, which means that folder titles are listed and searchable, but individual documents have not been examined or arranged in chronological order within a folder. In the interest of making this large collection available to researchers in a timely manner, archival material may not have been refoldered and metal fasteners (particularly staples) may not have been removed. Original folder titles have been maintained as often as possible while imposing overall order, clarity and accessibility to the collection.

Because of the time and space limitations of this project, archivists worked with only a few hundred boxes at one time. Processed boxes were sent to storage before bringing in a new group of boxes. When related material was found later, folders were added intellectually to the folder list, but not placed physically in the same intellectual order of the container list. When requesting boxes, please note the correct box numbers for folders within a series you would like to see, as they may not be in consecutive boxes.

Please note it is possible to search the entire container list of folders in one global search of the entire workbook. The complete container list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Researchers are invited to contact reference@ajhs.org with further questions regarding the collection; the reference staff of the American Jewish Historical Society should be able to direct researchers to the likely location of relevant archival material.

Researchers who use these collections and have descriptive information to add to the finding aid should contact reference@ajhs.org.

We would like to thank our volunteers on this project, Hanka Ablin, Evelyn Leicher, Mimi Lester, Sheldon Moline, Madeleine Okladek, and especially Jane Foss who has volunteered at the American Jewish Historical Society for many years in invaluable ways.

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Digitization Note

Digitization Note

A selection of material has been digitized from the Records of the UJA-Federation of New York, including photographs, oral histories, printed material, sound recordings, maps, minutes and films. The digitized material is available through the container list and through the Center for Jewish History’s Digital Collections portal. The complete container list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Public Relations Photographs
Legacy Photographs
Oral Histories
Printed Material
Sound Recordings
Maps
Minutes - UJA-Federation
Minutes - United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York
Minutes - Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities
Films

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Access Points

This collection is indexed under the following headings in the online catalog. Researchers desiring materials about related topics, persons, or places should search the catalog using these headings.

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Container List

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

The complete container list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

 

Subgroup I. Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (FJP), 1909—2000

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (FJP)

1198 Bankers Boxes and 13 Oversize Boxes and 4 Flat Files.
Arrangement:

Arranged in six series.

Related Material:

  • Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Executive/Campaign Officers and Executive Staff Subject Files, for additional
        files of Sanford Solender, William Kahn and Harry Mancher

  • Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation of New York –
    • UJF/Executive/Executive Office/Executive Vice-Presidents/William Kahn
    • UJF/Executive/Executive Office/Other Executive Staff/Elaine Morris
    • UJF/Administration/Finance and Budget/Annual Agency Files for continuation of FJP Annual Agency Files

Refer to this AJHS Related Collections list, most of which are related to the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies material.

Scope and Content:

The records of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies form Subgroup I of the UJA-Federation of New York collection. Included are the surviving records of its predecessor organizations, the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City (1917-1944) and the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities (1909-1944).

The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies (FJP) subgroup is divided by office of origin and function into six series, which will be described in detail at the series level below.

The Federation subgroup contains by far the largest amount of material of the five subgroups in the collection. Federation files have particular depth in the files of the Executive Vice-Presidents, especially Sanford Solender; in the 70 years of budget files for each of the affiliated agencies; and the subject files from the Community Services department detailing the control Federation had over agency budgets and programs. Additional overall subgroup detail can be found in the Arrangement outline in the section below.

Selected groups of files and audiovisual materials have been digitized and are accessible from the container list. Digitized materials include Board of Trustees minutes, Executive Committee minutes, Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities minutes and Annual Reports, photographs, selected printed material, sound recordings and films. A Public Affairs scrapbook from 1929 has been digitized and includes the largest amount of early Federation publicity material in the collection.

Historical Note:

In the early years of the 20th century, numerous attempts were made “to unravel the confused philanthropic New York condition”3 within the Jewish community. The founding of a Jewish federation in New York City was part of a nation-wide movement to federate local Jewish charities around the turn of the 20th century. As the American Jewish population grew with the immigration of poor Russian refugees, so did the need within each Jewish community for financial, medical and other forms of aid to members of this population. To minimize duplication of services among many small charities, a more efficient fundraising model was needed to meet growing needs, to avoid appealing to the same donors multiple times and to increase total charitable contributions from within these Jewish communities.

The increase in cooperation among Jewish charitable agencies in New York first took the form of mergers among small agencies, such as the formation of the United Jewish Charities of New York in 1874, according to the Jewish Communal Register of 1918. These mergers “were induced by the need for greater efficiency, by the increase in the number of Jewish poor and by a recognition that central rather than piecemeal efforts were required to cope with the poverty and destitution of a period when the almshouse was the major help available from public funds.”4

The formation of the first city-wide Jewish federation was part of this national movement, formalized in 1895, with the creation of the Federation of Jewish Charities in Boston. The federation model allowed existing agencies to maintain their autonomy, which was not possible with the earlier mergers, while sharing the costs of fundraising and eventually many other costs as well. The federation model proved a lasting one. According to Harry Lurie in his 1959 report for the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds, “the continuation of federation has been due to the successful results which have been derived from such cooperation among separate groups.”5

A committee of major Jewish philanthropic agency representatives called A Committee on Federation met on February 26, 1916 to sort through the various plans that had been proposed for a federation of philanthropic agencies, and appointed a Special Committee of Seven for this work. The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies was formally chartered by the state of New York on January 10, 1917 as the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York.6

The seven men in the special committee were Abram I. Elkus, Chairman; Dr. Harry G. Friedman, Secretary; Leo Arnstein, Joseph H. Cohen, Samuel Greenbaum, William Goldman, Jesse I. Straus, and Felix M. Warburg. They met in “a continuous round of meetings” through the rest of the year, until they felt ready to “proceed with the founding of Federation in 1917”.

The 1917 charter of the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York states: “To enable any corporation, now or hereafter existing, formed primarily for the benefit of the Jews of New York City, for charitable, benevolent, or education purposes, to affiliate with and to become members of the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York and by agreement with the latter regulate their mutual relations.” In 1966, according to “This is Your Federation”, “Federation comprise[d] more than 90 per cent of the Jewish-sponsored medical and health services in metropolitan New York which serve[d] more than a million persons of all faiths. It receive[d] the support of one out of every five families in the Jewish community”.7

When it was formed in 1917, Federation was affiliated with 42 societies as a “coordinating agency for Jewish social work, uniting Manhattan and Bronx charitable organizations. Its aims were: ‘to provide an efficient method of collecting and distributing contributions for the maintenance of such societies; to relieve the societies from the necessity of making separate appeals and collections and to enable them the more to carry on their philanthropic activities; to foster cooperation among such societies and to avoid unnecessary duplication of philanthropic endeavor in the aforesaid boroughs.’”8

The Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities (BFJC) was formed in 1909, eight years earlier. BFJC was formed for similar reasons - to support local Jewish social service agencies with funding, administrative and other professional aid. In 1944 these two federations merged to form the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York. “91 institutions of the New York Federation and the 25 constituent agencies of the Brooklyn Federation, which together have a record of serving each year more than 300,000 men, women and children.”9

Federation and its affiliated agencies evolved as the Jewish community and the New York community in New York City grew and changed. From its beginning in 1917, Federation categorized its agencies into groups by the function that reflected their social services focus: Child Care, Delinquency, Medical Care, Relief of Sick and Needy, Settlement/Education and Vacation Activities reflect the needs of a poor community towards the end of WWI. By the mid-1920s, the functional groups by which the agencies were organized at Federation included most of the above, with the addition of Religious Education and Community Center Activities. By the mid-1940s Vocational and Employment agencies had replaced Delinquency agencies; Fresh Air work, largely summer camps for children and teenagers, had replaced Vacation Activities; and Family Welfare and Vocational agencies had replaced Relief of Sick and Needy and other Vocational agencies.

By the end of WWII the Jewish population was moving out of their immigrant neighborhoods in Brooklyn, the Lower East Side and the Bronx to more diverse and spread-out neighborhoods on the Upper West Side of Manhattan; to many neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens; farther out on Long Island; and to Staten Island and Westchester. Federation maintained affiliations with agencies as they moved to these locations to service the changing population, and worked with umbrella organizations or created new ones to further coordinate the activities and programs of the diverse agencies. For example, the Central Bureau for the Jewish Aged, founded in 1945 by Federation as an offshoot of Jewish Family Services, coordinated communication and cooperation among Federation and non-Federation agencies that provided care and services to the Jewish Aged. And Federation created the Associated YM-YWHAs of Greater New York, established in 1957, which gave greater control to Federation in expanding services and facilities and in allocating pooled resources to that group of affiliated Ys.

The 1960s brought about a great need for new buildings both within New York City and as Federation’s reach expanded to the suburbs; this created an enormous increase in fundraising requirements. In 1961 Federation announced the start of a “City of Life” building campaign: “We are faced with sharp increases in our aged population. Chronic illness is our leading health problem. Mental illness is on the rise. Neighborhoods are shifting and our community life is threatened with disruption … buildings that have served for almost a century have outlived their usefulness … During the 1950’s it became evident to Federation that community needs were outstripping our facilities, and that the time had come to set into motion the machinery to make this City of Life a reality.” As described in “Let us build us a City of Life”, four years of study preceded their announcement in order to take the time “to project the services required to meet ever-growing demands.” Federation’s Board of Trustees voted to “inaugurate a Building Fund in order that Federation’s medical and social welfare services in Greater New York be brought to excellence in terms of the next decades.” The initial goal of the Building Fund was over $104,000,000.10

Part of this move to upgrade and update was related to external issues. According to Charles Liebman in his paper on Federation published in 1979, “[t]he changes occasioned by growing sources of outside support were accompanied by dramatic demographic changes in new York’s population”. Government funding was growing in some of Federation’s functional areas such as the Federation-affiliated hospitals. Included in these external changes was the fact that “the Jewish needy … were increasingly Orthodox”, and did not choose to participate in many of the programs offered by Federation agencies such as family strife, vocational guidance, camping and community center services. Because of this and because of the changing demographic in the neighborhoods where Federation-affiliated institutions were physically located, “the number of non-Jews served by Federation agencies increased … demographic changes alone pointed toward a more nonsectarian policy”.11

In addition to new facilities and buildings, Federation went through many changes in the structure and focus of their programs and in the allocation of funding in the 1960s and 1970s. In 1967 Joseph Willen and Maurice Hexter, who had jointly led Federation as Executive Vice-Presidents for 25 years, retired, and were replaced by David Salten and in 1970 by Sanford Solender; with this change in professional leadership the administrative and operational departments at Federation began to change to accommodate changes in agency needs, changes within the greater Jewish community and increased funding from government and other outside sources.

Jewish Community Councils were formed to deal with issues of neighborhood preservation and community development; functional group designations became less important as a way of grouping agencies as more agencies developed varied, cross-functional programs grouped geographically. An example of this would be the Federation - Jewish Community Council of the Rockaways or the Federation Joint Services of the Lower East Side. Often anchored by a YM-YWHA in the same community, programs were available in one location that previously would have been scattered among various agencies.

Soon after the Yom Kippur War in 1973, agreements between Federation and United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York (UJA) as to when their campaigns would be held so as to not compete with each other, had to be reconsidered. UJA increased their fundraising for Israel in the fall months of the year when Federation traditionally held their campaign. Representatives of both organizations met to discuss the issue and decided in 1974 that the best way to fundraise among supporters of both local agencies (Federation) and of Israel (UJA), would be to combine their campaigns. From 1974 to 1986 the organizations remained separate but with a joint campaign – the UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign.

In the early 1980s leadership from UJA and Federation began to work out the specifics of merging the rest of the functions of their respective organizations into one fully merged organization. As of July 1, 1986, this organization has been known as UJA-Federation of New York.

Footnotes

Restrictions:


Access Restrictions: Because of the size of the collection and of the finding aid, the actual box and folder lists are in a separate Container List, linked to this finding aid at the start of each Scope and Content Note at every level where folders exist, with this sentence:

The complete container list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

How to Use Container List: The Container List is a very large Excel spreadsheet. The first page you see when you click on the link to the Container List is a hierarchical outline for the entire collection. This outline links to each of the sheets in the spreadsheet, identified by tabs at the bottom. Please note that some subseries (or subsubseries, or subsubsubseries, etc.) are combined in one tab in the container list; the link in the outline will take you to the right sheet; you can search within the sheet to find the specific box you are looking for by using the control-F function.

To search the entire spreadsheet at one time (that is, to search every sheet), click control-F, then click on “options”, then set the “within” field to “workbook”. Because of limitations in Excel, you will need to set this to workbook every time you open the Container List and want to search the entire spreadsheet.

Once you know which boxes you would like to request, either click on the appropriate column for links to Aeon or follow directions here for requesting them through the catalog: http://www.cjh.org/p/135

Given the amount of archival materials, the collection (except for the oversize and miscellaneous boxes) is housed at an off-site storage location, within a climate and humidity controlled environment. Please be advised that you will need to request this material at least two (2) business days in advance to use any material in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room. Providing as much notice as possible before a visit would be helpful. Boxes can be requested through the box and folder listings in the Container List. For further information, please e-mail reference@ajhs.org.

Use Restrictions: Information concerning the literary rights may be obtained from the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society. Users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. For more information contact:
American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: reference@ajhs.org

Series 1: Executive, 1916—1997 (bulk dates 1917—1986)

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive

The Series is in English.
293 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in five subseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation of New York – UJF/Executive, for the continuation after the merger of the Minutes and the Executive
    Vice-President files found in this Series.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Executive Series contains the files of the executive leadership of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York and its predecessor organization, the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City, from 1916-1986. It includes the files of both the lay leaders and members of the professional staff, from just prior to Federation’s founding in 1917 through the merger of Federation with UJA in 1986. Files created after 1986 are generally considered to be part of the merged organization, UJA-Federation, and can be found in Subgroup IV/Series 1. Files from the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities can be found in this subgroup/Series 5.

The Executive series includes the following subseries:

Of primary importance are the files of the Executive Vice-Presidents (EVPs) and the minutes of the Board of Trustees and the Executive Committee, because they contain information about every major initiative addressed at Federation.

Historical Note:

The predecessor organization of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York was the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City. The governance structure and documentation for this early New York Federation was developed by a Committee on Federation; the activities and accomplishments of this committee is documented in the earliest minutes in this series. By June 6, 1916 the committee had adopted a plan and governance documents; incorporation was as of January 1, 1917 (or April 27th, depending on the source consulted), the By-Laws were listed on January 8, 1917, New York state formally chartered Federation on January 10, 1917, and the first meeting of the Board of Trustees was on January 29, 1917. The charter became law with approval from the Governor of New York on May 15, 1917. For more detail on these early governance dates and sources, see “The Founding Date of Federation” blog post.

In 1944 the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City merged with the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities to become the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (FJP). In 1986 FJP merged with United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York to become UJA-Federation of New York.

Subseries A - Board of Trustees, 1916—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Board of Trustees

36 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries.

  • Subsubseries i. Board of Trustees Minutes
    • Subsubsubseries a. Bound volumes – arranged chronologically
    • Subsubsubseries b. Loose minutes – arranged chronologically
  • Subsubseries ii. Subject Files – arranged alphabetically
Processing Information:

Some of the earliest minutes are difficult to read and have been transcribed here. Dates of transcriptions are: August 23, 1916; October 25, 1916; October 31, 1916; November 28, 1916; February 19, 1917; March 26, 1917; and April 21, 1917.

Related Material:

Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation of New York – UJF/Executive – Board of Directors Minutes and Executive Vice-Presidents files which
    contain the continuation of many Federation topics, particularly in relation to details of the 1986 merger.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The minutes of the Board of Trustees contain all of the major decisions voted on by the board at monthly meetings. Board of Trustees minutes, 1916-1986, appear in three formats: bound volumes of the minutes plus the attachments distributed with each set; digital versions of the bound volumes, which can be accessed here and also by clicking on the links in the Container List; and sets of minutes in folders, often together with agendas and mailings for those meetings.

Digital files can be searched individually via their links. For a global search through the entire set of minutes, please contact reference@ajhs.org.

Please note that for most years, the Executive Committee minutes are combined with the Board of Trustees minutes and can be found in this subsubseries. For minutes of Executive Committee meetings in the 1970s, see Subseries B.

Because very few files from Officers and Board of Trustees members have survived in this collection, the Board of Trustees minutes found here provide an important source of Board activities, resolutions, budgets and discussion on various other issues that were presented for discussion. Because they are arranged chronologically, if the date of an event or issue is known, the minutes may be the best starting point for locating information on a topic not found elsewhere in the finding aid.

Researchers can use the name of the respective governing body to differentiate the philanthropic organizations. A “Board of Trustees” led the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City through 1944 and also led the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (FJP) from 1944 through 1986. In other subgroups, the “Board of Governors” led United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York (UJA), and post-merger, the “Board of Directors” provides leadership to the United Jewish Appeal-Federation of New York (UJF).

Historical Note:

The Board of Trustees was formed on June 6, 1916 by a “Committee on Federation”, composed of leaders in the Jewish community in New York City when they adopted a plan for a “Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City”. This plan was published as a pamphlet and is housed with Federation governance documents that were held by the Public Affairs department. The first Board of Trustees meeting was held on January 29, 1917.

From the 1963 Handbook for Trustees: “Federation shall be managed by a Board of Trustees consisting of Trustees designated by Beneficiary Societies, Trustees-at-large and Honorary Trustees-at-large. In addition, each officer … who is not a Trustee shall be entitled (a) to vote …, and (b) to serve on committees …”12 Trustees were designated by the beneficiary societies (agencies support by Federation) based on the size of Federation’s distributions to that society.

There were half as many Trustees-at-Large as Trustees and they were elected by the Federation membership.

At various times in the history of the Federation, the organization wrestled with the size and structure of the Board, as well as the distribution of power and representation of the agencies on the Board as institutional members. Affiliated institutions could often appoint several members (and alternates) to serve as Board of Trustees members. As the Federation increased its membership among metropolitan New York agencies, the size of the Board also increased to include representatives from the participating institutions. Consequently, by the early 1970s, with as many as 150 affiliated agencies, Federation formed the Committee on the Composition of the Board of Trustees and Committees (FJP/Executive/Committees) to address the unwieldy nature of a Board that had grown to nearly 500.

The Board of Trustees continued as the primary governing body of Federation until the merger with UJA in 1986.

The minutes of record of the Board of Trustees meetings were bound into volumes, and have all been digitized (see below). Included in the first volume are minutes of meetings that preceded the formal incorporation and chartering of the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City, documenting the process of creating the organization through the second half of 1916. The various milestones leading up to the formation of Federation are listed in “The Founding Date of Federation” blog post.

Footnote

Subseries B - Executive Committee Minutes, 1917—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Committee Minutes

3.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries.

  • Subsubseries i. Bound volumes – arranged chronologically, 1973-1986
  • Subsubseries ii. Loose minutes – arranged chronologically, 1917-1986
Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Many of the minutes of the Executive Committee (EC) are contained within this subseries, and appear in three formats: bound volumes of the minutes, 1973-1986; digital versions of the bound volumes, which can be accessed by clicking on the links in the Container List; and sets of minutes in folders, often together with agendas and mailings for those meetings.

Please note that for most years, Executive Committee minutes are combined with the Board of Trustees minutes because EC minutes were distributed to Board of Trustees members and in most years were not retained in separate files. Therefore many sets of Executive Committee minutes not found in this subseries may exist within Subseries A – Board of Trustees/Minutes.

Digital files linked from the Container List can be searched individually. For a global search through the entire set of minutes, please contact reference@ajhs.org.

The minutes of the Executive Committee give the researcher an overview into important issues discussed and voted on by Federation leadership in any given year.

Historical Note:

The Executive Committee (EC) was established by a vote of the Organization Committee on January 8, 1917. According to the 1963 Handbook for Trustees13, the Executive Committee consisted of the President of Federation who acted as the Chairman; all ex-Presidents, the President-Elect and 21 other members. These 21 were comprised of 7 Trustees-at-Large and 14 Trustees or Alternate Trustees designated by the Beneficiary Societies.

Powers and duties included: “to consider any matter referred to it by the President or the Board of Trustees”14; “to manage the affairs of Federation in the intervals between the June and September meetings of the Board of Trustees” and to select the President or acting President from among the Vice-Presidents in the event of the death or resignation of the President and in the absence of a President-Elect. Given the more manageable size of the Executive Committee, the committee was often tasked with discussing, deciding, and recommending solutions to Federation issues that would have been impossible to consider with a full meeting of the Board of Trustees.

Little documentation of the work of the Executive Committee exists until about 1951 however, when this entity may have taken on an altered role.

Upon the merger of Federation with UJA in 1986, the EC was replaced by the Executive Committee of the merged organization.

Footnotes

Subseries C – Committees of the Board, 1917—1993

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Committees of the Board

72 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in six subsubseries:

Alphabetical within each subsubseries.

Related Material:

Executive Office Staff, for additional Committee files.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The committee files that survived do not in all cases represent the most important files of the most important committees, but they provide insight on the detailed, time-consuming work of the members of the Board of Trustees.

Historical Note:

A few committees of the Board of Trustees were created during the first month of Federation’s operation, in January 1917. Committees were formed and disbanded as needed, with some committees controlling the main functions of the organization throughout Federation’s history – primarily the income and distribution of the funds raised each year.

Before the first official meeting of the Board of Trustees, when the governing bodies were still being formed, it was the Organization Committee that created the other entities. At the Organization Committee meeting of January 8, 1917, committees already in existence include the Law Committee, Committee on Admissions, By-Laws Committee, Membership Committee, Office Committee. The responsibilities of the Executive Committee were voted on and approved. 19 Committees were listed in the By-Laws. Some eventually became departments (Employment, Personal Service and Publicity Committees) or Functional Groups (Medical, Delinquency and Child-Caring Committees); some remained committees through the entire existence of Federation (Executive, Distribution).

In the Federation Handbook for members of the Board of Trustees published in 1963, there were 22 committees listed. These include the Administration Committee, Building Committee, Committee on Communal Planning, Distribution Committee, Executive Committee, Finance Committee, Committee on Fundraising, Institutional Trustees Council, Joint Purchasing Committee, Nominating Committee and Committee on Religious Affairs.

Subsubseries i – Building Fund, 1945—1978

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Committees of the Board » Building Fund

22 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical within each Subsubsubseries.

Related Material:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Building Fund files are arranged into groups of files that include the files of various staff and lay leaders. These include files of Martha K. Selig, secretary to the committee; Samuel Silberman, chairman of the Building Fund Program Committee; Robert Langer departmental subject files; and general subject files of the Building Fund Committee and the Building Fund Program Committee.

Historical Note:

The Building Fund was started at the end of World War II to raise large funds additional to general operating expenses and program allocations, in order to renovate and replace aging infrastructure at many of the agencies.

Federation Executive Vice-President Joseph Willen was very involved with the creation of the Building Fund in the 1940s and 1950s. One of Willen’s files dated 1945 is titled, “Building Fund Campaign for Expansion, Modernization, Research”, an early name for this program.

A later program was launched in 1961 and described in detail in “Let us build us a City of Life”, a hard bound publication that listed building needs by agency and functional group, and included the costs Federation was seeking in order to implement each project. Some form of the Building Fund existed by the time of the 1986 merger with UJA and it continued after the merger.

Subsubseries ii – Communal Planning Committee (CPC), 1946—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Committees of the Board » Communal Planning Committee (CPC)

6 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical within each subsubsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Communal Planning Committee (CPC) files span the 1950s through 1986, and continued in a similar form after the merger with UJA. Half of the files came from the desk of Martha Selig (see below), who served as secretary to the Committee in its early years and later, after becoming Executive Director for Community Services in the early 1960s, as a committee member. Part of one box of files are from the office of Wilma (Billie) Tisch, then a volunteer lay member of the CPC. The remaining files are general Subject Files maintained in the Executive Office, some of which continue until the 1986 merger.

Historical Note:

The Communal Planning Committee (CPC) was most likely created at the same time as the Building Fund, at the end of World War II. Executive Vice-Presidents Maurice Hexter and Joseph Willen assumed that joint role in 1942, and by the end of the war were prepared to launch new initiatives like a formal communal planning process. In conjunction with the Building Fund, the members of the Committee on Communal Planning (as it was referred to in the 1963 Handbook for Trustees) were required to “advise the Board of Trustees with respect to the communal desirability of any projects of Beneficiary Societies; the admission of Beneficiary Societies and the disaffiliation … of Beneficiary Societies; programs designed to improve the service of Federation and Beneficiary Societies to the community.”15

In other words, the CPC evaluated and surveyed the communities Federation serviced throughout greater New York City in order to propose and design new programs of benefit to the affiliated agencies, and to ensure that the most appropriate agencies were affiliated with Federation as the agencies and the communities’ needs evolved.

Footnote

Subsubseries iii – Distribution Committee (DC), 1917—1993

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Committees of the Board » Distribution Committee (DC)

26 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical within each subsubsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Distribution Committee subsubseries includes files of committee secretary Martha Selig. See Scope and Content note above for more on Martha Selig. Also in this subsubseries are files of committee chairman Wilma (Billie) Tisch, 1975-1976; committee chair and member Lawrence A. Kobrin; about 10 boxes of general subject files; subcommittee files; and Functional Committee files.

Historical Note:

The Distribution Committee was formed by the Organization Committee in early 1917 as one of the original governing bodies of Federation. Through a complex system using subcommittees arranged by the Functional Groups of the agencies (Medical agencies, Care of Aged agencies, Community Centers and Camps, etc.), members of each subcommittee spent several months making site visits to agencies, meeting with agency representatives to go over each agency budget and, eventually, pulling together proposed budgets for each agency, each functional group and ultimately for all of Federation each budget year. Allocations were based on these budgets, and on fundraising expectations for that budget year.

All members of the Distribution Committee were Trustees-at-Large, and were appointed by the President of Federation at the first regular meeting of the Board of Trustees after the summer recess. According to the 1963 Handbook for Trustees, “The Distribution Committee shall prepare the annual budget for Federation, incorporating therein Federation’s own operating budget … The annual budget, together with the report of the Chairman of the Distribution Committee, shall be mailed to each Trustee …”16

Footnote

Subsubseries iv – Institutional Trustees Council, 1936—1969

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Committees of the Board » Institutional Trustees Council

2.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical within each subsubsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Institutional Trustees Council (ITC) Subsubseries contains Agency files and Subject files. The Agency files contain information about each of the agencies that was used in the ITC newsletter. Some of this is historical information that begins in the 1930s for some of the agencies, with most of this documentation covering the 1950s and 1960s. Type of material includes Annual Reports, brochures and newsletters. The Subject files include projects and publications of the ITC, including the newsletter “The 116” with news of the affiliated agencies, and informative booklets like “Pointers on Public Relations” as an aid to agency executives.

Historical Note:

The presidents of the Federation agencies met during the year with Federation Executives as a committee named the Agency Presidents and Executives Committee in order to discuss issues of common interest. In 1951 a subcommittee recommended the creation of a more formal, permanent entity, to be named the Institutional Trustees Council (ITC). Eventually, in approximately 1958, David Sher became the first chair of the Institutional Trustees Council and it became an official standing committee of Federation. According to a notebook found in the Institutional Trustees Council subsubseries, it is believed that the Advisory Committee on Institutional Board Memberships may have been the predecessor body of the Institutional Trustees Council.

The Council’s objective was to deepen the feeling of membership among representatives of the beneficiary societies within the Federation community, and engender a sense of responsibility in the growth and success of Federation. Through workshops and instructional newsletters and publications, the ITC sought to gain agency executives’ full support in increasing fundraising among the staff and lay leadership of the agencies. Federation also encouraged the institutional directors to develop a more active role in Federation’s campaigns through their involvement in the ITC.

Another function of the ITC was to minimize the frictions that arose between Federation and its member agencies because of the appearance of conflict between the allocation of funds and the autonomy of the agencies. The newsletter, “Federation Highlights” was first published in 1955 with the goal of strengthening the relationship between Federation and its member agencies and keeping them informed about central thinking and developments. The title of the newsletter, “The 116,” was a reference to the 116 health and welfare agencies serving the Jewish communities through Federation. The ITC became an “internal relations” center and sounding board.

The Institutional Trustees Council existed until 1967 when Ruth Ellis, longtime Executive Secretary for the Council, retired. Mrs. Thomas Liebman (Aline Wexler Liebman), chairman of the ITC at the time, recognized Federation’s lack of administrative support; the ITC was discontinued as a standing committee by resolution of the Executive Committee on June 26, 1967.

Subsubseries v – Law Committee, 1938—1982

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Committees of the Board » Law Committee

9 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files of the Law Committee contain minutes of committee meetings, real estate and properties rented and owned by Federation, early files beginning in 1917 covering the merger between Federation and Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities in 1944, and matters relating to the Women’s Division Thrift Shop.

Subsubseries vi – Other Committees, 1917—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Committees of the Board » Other Committees

6.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Other Committees includes files of Ad Hoc committees created to handle specific short term issues, and other committees for which only small numbers of folders have survived. These include: Commission on the Role of Federation 1969-1972, Committee on the Composition of Board of Trustees and Committees 1970-1973, Committee on Research 1941-1967; Federation Agency Executive Advisory Council 1973-1985; Nominating Committee 1944, 1975-1986; Population Study Committee 1981-1986; and Study Committee 1953-1960. Additional files on some committees can be found scattered through other series in the files of staff members who retained committee materials through the years of their involvement.

Subseries D – Officers, 1947—1997

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Officers

4 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries.

Related Material:

Committees of the Board, for files of officers who were chairmen of committees, specifically:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

There are two subsubseries in this subseries:

Most of the files in the I-433 collection, like many institutions with an active board, were generated by staff members as support to the board leadership in either a direct or an indirect way. Staff maintained the files that came from the officers of Federation, which are mostly comprised of correspondence. Some of the subject files within the Executive Vice-Presidents (EVP) series appear to be work performed jointly between the EVP and some of the officers. It is probable that other files generated by the officers was maintained at their offices or in their homes, and never became part of this collection.

Therefore within I-433, there is very little correspondence or other written records to document the work of the presidents or other officers. Researchers should look in the Board of Trustees minutes or Executive Committee minutes and in the files of the various committees in order to discern the impact a particular officer may have had on Federation.

Historical Note:

Officers of Federation were volunteer lay leaders who worked closely with professional staff to set policy, participate in discussions and voting at Board of Trustees and Executive Committee meetings, lead fundraising campaigns and run the various committees that kept Federation functioning. These busy executives held meetings in the mornings and evenings and left the administrative details to the staff, who maintained the files.

Subsubseries i – Presidents, 1947—1997

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Officers » Presidents

4 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in six subsubsubseries, alphabetical by name of President.

Related Material:

Executive Office Staff/Executive Vice-Presidents/Sanford Solender files for Lawrence B. Buttenwieser (President, 1971-1974)
    correspondence and for Frederick P. Rose (President, 1974-1977) correspondence

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Oral histories that exist for presidents in the subsubsubseries below are listed in that subsubsubseries; other presidents with oral histories include:

Scope and Content:

Some of the files of five Federation presidents survived as part of this collection. Federation records manager Colonel Seymour Pomrenze located two boxes of Harry Mancher files at Mancher’s home from the years of his presidency and made them part of the collection. Other presidents’ files are minimal and represent just a snapshot of the kind of work these presidents were involved with while in office. All of the presidents are listed in the UJA-Federation Timeline, many with photographs. A concise list of Presidents and Executive Directors is here.

Subsubsubseries a – Norman S. Goetz,  1947-1948.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Officers » Presidents » Norman S. Goetz

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

One folder contains two bound “Reports of the President at the Annual Meeting”, 1947 and 1948, which have also been digitized. See container list for links to the digital files.

Historical Note:

Norman S. Goetz was President of Federation from 1945 to 1948.

Subsubsubseries b - Salim Lewis,  1954-1955.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Officers » Presidents » Salim Lewis

1 Folder.
Arrangement:

One folder is in a combined box with Samuel Silberman and Milton Weill.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

In addition to the one folder of correspondence, 1954-1955 found in the Presidents subsubseries, other correspondence with Salim Lewis may be found scattered throughout the Executive Series.

Historical Note:

Salim Lewis was President of Federation from 1954 to 1957.

Subsubsubseries c – Harry R. Mancher,  bulk 1969-1988.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Officers » Presidents » Harry R. Mancher

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Executive/Campaign Officers & Executive Staff/Mancher for additional Mancher
    files as Treasurer of Federation just prior to his presidency and the formation of the merged campaign in 1974, and as Treasurer of
    the Joint Campaign.

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Harry R. Mancher

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

One box of files includes Mancher’s involvement with Altro, the 60th anniversary of Federation in 1977, Biographical information, honors received and speeches he made, mostly as president of Federation but also covering years before and after.

Historical Note:

Harry Mancher was President of Federation from 1977 to 1980. He was born in 1918 and became a senior managing partner of the accounting firm of S.D. Leidesdorf & Co. Mancher’s involvement in Federation began when his employer Samuel D. Leidesdorf, President of Federation 1935 to 1937, encouraged Mancher to become a board member of Altro Health & Rehabilitation Services (an agency of Federation) as a way of becoming involved in philanthropy; Mancher later became president of Altro. In 1974 Mancher was instrumental in the establishment of the Joint Campaign of UJA-Federation, and served as its treasurer for many years. He also served as a trustee and treasurer of Mount Sinai Hospital and its Medical Center and School of Medicine, another affiliated agency of Federation. Harry Mancher died in 1988.

Subsubsubseries d – Samuel J. (Buddy) Silberman,  1963-1968.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Officers » Presidents » Samuel J. (Buddy) Silberman

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Contained here is about one box of Correspondence and Subject Files primarily from the years of Silberman’s presidency.

Historical Note:

Samuel J. (Buddy) Silberman was President of Federation from 1966 to 1969. Previously, he was Federation Campaign Chair in 1957 and 1958. An audio recording of the 1957 Campaign Workshop in which Silberman participated as Campaign Chair has been digitized and is linked to the Container List. Silberman was also President of the Consolidated Cigar Corporation.

Subsubsubseries e – Milton Weill,  1951-1957.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Officers » Presidents » Milton Weill

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

P-34, Milton Weill Papers

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Contained here is about one box of primarily Correspondence Files from the years of Weill’s presidency with some additions through 1957. Of particular interest are the files on Planned Parenthood in the “Welfare Council of New York” folder.

Historical Note:

Milton Weill was President of Federation from 1951 to 1954.

Subsubsubseries f – Lawrence A. Wien,  1960, 1963.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Officers » Presidents » Lawrence A. Wien

6 Folders.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Lawrence A. Wien

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Contained here are Correspondence Files from the years of Wien’s presidency.

Historical Note:

Lawrence A. Wien was President of Federation from 1960 to 1963.

Subsubseries ii – Vice-Presidents—Leonard N. Block, 1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Officers » Vice-Presidents—Leonard N. Block

1 bound volume.
Arrangement:

Chronological within volume.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Leonard N. Block

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This one bound volume is titled “Merger Absorption” and contains a compilation of documents dealing with the UJA-Federation merger in the years leading up to the merger, together with his correspondence relating to those documents. Based on other documentation in the files it is likely that Block assembled these documents in order that Federation and the merged organization would have a permanent record of his negative opinion of the merger.

Historical Note:

Leonard N. Block was Vice-President of Federation approximately from 1962 to 1964, a long-time member of the Distribution Committee in the 1960s and 1970s and Chairman of the Distribution Committee from about 1961 – 1963. He was a member of the Board of Trustees approximately from 1956 to 1978. Block had strong opinions and voiced them in widely circulated letters found in multiple executives’ files as members of the Board of Trustees deliberated on important decisions. He was born in 1912, became chairman of Block Drug Company, devoted a lot of his time to philanthropic work at Federation, Mount Sinai Medical Center and Lincoln Center, among other organizations. He was a founder of the Jewish Association for Services for the Aged, JASA, an agency of Federation. Leonard Block died in 2005.17

Footnote

Subseries E - Executive Office Staff, 1916—1990

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff

Subsubseries i - Executive Director/Executive Vice-Presidents, 1916—1990

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Executive Director/Executive Vice-Presidents

140 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged chronologically in the order in which the Executive held office.

Related Material:

  • Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Marjorie G. Wyler, daughter of I. Edwin Goldwasser

  • I. Edwin Goldwasser’s obituary in The New York Times, June 30, 1974

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files of the various Executive Vice-Presidents (EVPs) are voluminous. It appears that their office maintained the files for the board leadership, as the EVPs attended the same meetings and participated or led the discussions and decision-making process. Very few files of the officers of Federation have survived, or in fact existed, as it was the role of the executive staff to keep a record and maintain the files.

These EVP files demonstrate the wide-ranging issues that crossed the desks of these influential men, and the high levels at which they operated among Federation lay leaders on the Board of Trustees, among the leadership of the affiliated agencies and in the community at large. These files cover the tenure of six of Federation’s seven EVPs, from Solomon B. Lowenstein in 1920 through the end of William Kahn’s term of office at the time of the merger of Federation with UJA in 1986. The files contain correspondence, memoranda, subject files, budgets and reports covering every department within Federation.

None of the files of Federation’s first Executive Director, I. Edwin Goldwasser, have survived. There are a limited number of the files of the second Executive Director, Solomon B. Lowenstein. Some of the correspondence and subject files from the offices of both Goldwasser and Lowenstein can be found in limited form within the Finance and Budget files (Series 2 – Administration/Subseries B – Finance and Budget) for the years of their involvement. Some Lowenstein correspondence exists within Maurice B. Hexter’s files; because Hexter was hired as Lowenstein’s close associate, some files of the two men appear to have been commingled.

All of the Executive Vice-Presidents are listed in the UJA-Federation Timeline, some with photographs. A concise list of Presidents and Executive Directors is here.

Historical Note:

When Federation began in 1917, the senior professional staff member held the title of Executive Director and worked closely with the lay leadership of Federation to maintain organizational continuity as this leadership rotated through their board positions every few years. Two men, I. Edwin Goldwasser and Solomon B. Lowenstein, consecutively held the position of Executive Director through 1935 when, during Lowenstein’s tenure, the title was changed to Executive Vice-President (EVP). Following Lowenstein as Executive Vice-President were Maurice Hexter and Joseph Willen, who shared the position most effectively, from 1942 to 1967.

According to The Golden Heritage, Willen began working at Federation in 1918. Prior to his appointment as Executive Vice-President, Willen “served in practically every administrative capacity until his exceptional financial ability placed him in charge of organizing the community for raising funds.” Before being appointed Executive Vice-President, Hexter “began his career in 1915 as head of the Milwaukee Federation of Jewish Charities [and] in 1938…came to Federation [of Jewish Philanthropies of New York] to head its fund-distribution and communal planning division.”18 In short, based on their respective areas of expertise, Willen was in charge of fundraising, “a recognized master in the field of fundraising and community organization” and Hexter was in charge of administration. Hexter was “considered one of the most highly-regarded experts in fundraising and communal planning”19 including, most importantly, the distribution of funds for the support and maintenance of FJP’s agencies and in coordinating efforts in medical and health services.

According to an article in the New York Times on January 8, 1967, “It was ‘Hexter and Willen’ … who were responsible for making Federation the world’s largest independent agency for raising funds for local needs.” The article continues, “Under their joint leadership the federation pioneered in new concepts of community planning for health, welfare and related services. Their efforts helped eliminate duplication, expanded service into sections of the city where they were previously unavailable, and extended aid to people of all faiths and races in contrast with the federation’s once primarily sectarian-oriented approach.”20 In 1967, both Willen and Hexter retired from their leadership roles but continued to maintain offices at Federation. “… [S]o valuable is their advice and experience, that both men have been retained as Executive Consultants”21. Hexter and Willen worked as Executive Consultants through the 1980s (Willen) and into the 1990s (Hexter).

Thereafter the position of Executive Vice-President reverted back to a single man through the merger with United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York in 1986. As Executive Vice-Presidents, Hexter and Willen were followed by David G. Salten (1967-1969), Sanford Solender (1970-1981), and William Kahn (1981-1986). It became the custom for Executive Vice-Presidents, upon retirement, to assume the title of Executive Consultant and remain active in specific projects within the executive leadership of Federation.

The Federation Executive Directors and Executive Vice-Presidents, with their dates, are as follows:

Executive Director:

1917-1920I. Edwin Goldwasser
1920-1935Solomon B. Lowenstein

Executive Vice-President:
1935-1942Solomon B. Lowenstein
1942-1966Joseph Willen and Maurice B. Hexter
1967-1969David G. Salten
1970-1981Sanford Solender
1981-1986William Kahn

Footnotes

Subsubsubseries a - Solomon B. Lowenstein,  1920—1942.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Executive Director/Executive Vice-Presidents » Solomon B. Lowenstein

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically within Agency Budget and Correspondence files, and General Correspondence files.

Processing Information:

Most of the Lowenstein files that exist in the collection turned up gradually during processing; they were packed without context, together with unrelated files and incorrectly labeled.

Related Material:

I-42, Hebrew Orphan Asylum of New York

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Although limited in scope, the Solomon Lowenstein files serve as a snapshot of his work leading Federation over the 22 years he served as Executive Director/Executive Vice-President. The Agency Budget and Correspondence files, 1915-1947, extend before and after his dates at Federation, incorporating both earlier and later files for some of Federation’s affiliated agencies. They are arranged by name of agency and contain both budgets and correspondence with agencies, with bulk dates of 1926-1940. Lowenstein’s incomplete correspondence files cover the years 1935 – 1941. The survival of these early files, although random and very incomplete, provides a layer of context to the Federation history that is revealed in greater depth in later years.

Biographical Note:

Dr. Solomon B. Lowenstein served as Executive Director of Federation 1920-1935 and, in a change of title, Executive Vice-President 1935-1942. He worked in Cincinnati after his ordination as “head worker of the Jewish Settlement” there and for three years as superintendent of the United Jewish Charities in Cincinnati. In 1904 he and his wife, Linda Berger, moved to New York City where he became assistant manager of the United Jewish Charities (later the Jewish Social Services Association). He worked for 15 years as the superintendent of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum, until 1920, when he became Executive Director of Federation.

Dr. Lowenstein died of a heart attack while on his way to a meeting of the Joint Distribution Committee on January 20, 1942. Hexter and Willen jointly took over as EVP upon Lowenstein’s death.22

Footnote

Subsubsubseries b - Maurice B. Hexter,  bulk 1938—1990.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Executive Director/Executive Vice-Presidents » Maurice B. Hexter

24 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arrangement of Maurice Hexter’s files reflects the order in which they were filed originally, and falls into these categories:

  • Subject Files - arranged by year (1938-1945); then alphabetically
  • Subject and Budget Files - arranged by budget year (1940/41-1944/45); then alphabetically by title (usually the name of an agency)
  • Consultant Files - arranged alphabetically

While the folder lists are in order, some of the folders are physically located in different boxes, making it necessary to jump back and forth between boxes. Therefore when requesting boxes, be sure to check for the correct box and folder designation.

Related Material:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The first section of Maurice Hexter’s files are identified as his subject files and cover the earliest dates of his employment at Federation, 1938-1945, his four years as Associate Director and his first three years as co-EVP. These files reflect in part his transition in 1938 from his immediate past work in Palestine with the Jewish Agency Executive Committee, and colonization programs for refugee Jews in South America.

The next section, combined subject and budget files 1940/41-1944/45, contain agency budget materials together with Hexter’s notes from Distribution Committee meetings and other agency-related materials. Some of the agency budget materials found here may be duplicated in part in Subgroup I: FJP/Administration/Finance and Budget/Annual Agency Files, but Hexter’s additions to the files are unique to his papers.

There are very few files from Hexter’s years of greatest involvement as EVP, 1946 through his retirement in 1967; for a partial record of Hexter’s FJP work during the missing years, correspondence may be found in the Willen files (FJP/Executive/EVP/Willen) as well as in the Budget files (FJP/Administration/Finance and Budget/Budget Materials/Agency Budget files).

The third category of files are those from Hexter’s 22 years post-retirement, as Executive Consultant for Federation, 1968-1990. These files document his continuing work on many of the issues and correspondences with which he was involved during the two missing decades, with a new emphasis on raising and distributing funds from family foundations and other sources to Federation agencies, as well as his new interest in sculpture. Biographical materials from and about the period prior to Hexter’s arrival at FJP in 1938 are included here.

Hexter’s work as Assistant Director, 1938-1942 included supervisory or oversight responsibility for the work of the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities. His files reflecting this work can be found with the Brooklyn Federation files in Series 5.

Biographical Note:

Maurice Beck Hexter was born June 30, 1891 in Cincinnati, Ohio. He studied at the University of Cincinnati and received an A.B. degree there in 1912, beginning his career as a social worker for the United Jewish Charities of Cincinnati that year. In 1915 he was hired as Executive Director of the Milwaukee Federation of Jewish Charities. He met his future wife, Marguerite Mock, in Milwaukee and they were married in 1921. In 1918 Hexter became the Director of Federated Jewish Charities of Boston, he received his M.A. from Harvard in 1922 and a Ph.D. in Social Ethics from Harvard in 1924. Their daughter Marjorie was born in 1930.

Hexter was appointed Executive Secretary of the Joint Palestine Survey Commission by Chaim Weizmann and Louis Marshall circa 1927; this commission laid the basis for the creation of the enlarged Jewish Agency as stipulated by the Palestine Mandate. In 1929, following the riots in Palestine, Dr. Hexter moved to Jerusalem to serve as Director of the Palestine Emergency Fund, distributing the funds to repair damage caused by the riots. He also served as an American non-Zionist member of the Executive of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, in charge of colonization work in Palestine, until 1938.23

In 1938 Solomon Lowenstein asked Dr. Hexter to return to the United States to work for him at the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City (later, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies). Then Executive Vice-President (EVP), Dr. Lowenstein was in poor health, and brought Hexter to Federation as his assistant in preparation for Lowenstein’s retirement. Upon Lowenstein’s sudden death in January 1942, Hexter assumed the title of Executive Vice-President in conjunction with long-time Federation staff leader Joseph Willen.24 In sharing the leadership position, Willen was largely responsible for the fundraising activities for the Federation, and Hexter was in charge of administration.

Among Hexter’s contributions as EVP of Federation was the successful 1944 merger of the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities with the Federation of for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City, which at that time included Manhattan and the Bronx. After this merger the combined federations were known as the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York. Hexter also dealt successfully with crises in the management of Federation’s child care agencies which were eventually combined into the Jewish Child Care Association (JCCA). He was responsible for the distribution of funds to all of the agencies supported by Federation through his management of Federation’s Distribution Committee. In his 1981 oral history Hexter explained why, in his opinion, the Federation in New York was so strong and successful in those early decades and what differentiated it from other federations around the United States – because the heads of the agencies who dominated the Board of Trustees, professionals and members of the Jewish elite (“the founding families”) in New York, ran the agencies well and made sure they were funded fairly.25

Hexter and Willen served jointly as EVP for 25 years, each retiring in 1967 and continuing as executive consultants after their retirements. Hexter maintained an active correspondence through the 1980s, advising Sanford Solender (when asked), EVP 1970-1981; administering the Henry Kaufmann Foundation as trustee; as chairman of the Grant Committee for the Samuel and Lois Silberman Foundation; and in his new-found avocation as a sculptor. Dr. Hexter died in his sleep in 1990 at the age of 99.

Footnotes

Subsubsubseries c - Joseph Willen,  bulk 1942—1960.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Executive Director/Executive Vice-Presidents » Joseph Willen

32.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Subject files, 1937-1960, and Consultant files, 1951-1974, each arranged alphabetically.

While the folder lists are in order, some of the folders are physically located in different boxes, making it necessary to jump back and forth between boxes. Therefore when requesting boxes, be sure to check for the correct box and folder designation.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Janet Younker Willen, wife of Joseph Willen, for her discussion of her husband, Joseph Willen, recounting information about his talent for fundraising and his working relationship with Dr. Maurice Hexter.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Willen’s files include the correspondence, memoranda, reports, staff materials, and subject files related to his tenure as Executive Vice-President and, later, as Executive Consultant. The files are separated by the positions that he held at the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York, which contain the material generated as Executive Vice-President (1935-1967) and Executive Consultant (1968-1975). The two subseries are arranged alphabetically. Willen’s Executive Vice-President files include his correspondence and material related to Federation’s participation in the Greater New York Fund and Federation’s relationship with the United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York (1943-1959). His files show his cooperation with Federation staff and lay leadership in raising funds for Federation and its agencies, including communication with Federation’s Business Men’s Council, annual campaign leadership, and the Building Fund Committee and its campaigns.

Researchers interested in Federation presidents or the interaction between the Executive Vice-Presidents and the Presidents of Federation should consult Willen’s correspondence with George Medalie, Norman Goetz, Ralph Samuel, Milton Weill, Salim L. Lewis, Gustave Levy, and Lawrence Wien. Because the Executive Vice-President provided continuity through the administrations of various Federation presidents, Willen’s copy of their correspondence may be all that is available for research. Researchers interested in Federation’s fundraising campaigns and divisions should consult Willen’s correspondence with Phillip Baskir, Nathan Bennett, Max Engler, Jacob M. Frankel, Mickey (Milton) Levine, Samuel Rosenthal and Rabbi Isaac Trainin, and Mrs. Newman Levy of the Women’s Division.

Biographical Note:

Joseph Willen was born in Russia circa 1897 and immigrated to the United States in 1905. He became a citizen of the United States in 1918. The same year, soon after his graduation from the City College of New York, Willen was hired as a campaign clerk at the recently-incorporated Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City. By 1923 he had become director of fundraising at Federation. In 1925, Joseph Willen married the activist and communal leader Pearl Larner, who tragically died in an accident in 1968. Willen later married Janet Younker. Willen had two children with his first wife Pearl and, later, raised two step-children with Janet. A significant portion of his personal communication with his wife and children can be found within his Federation folders.26

Alongside Dr. Maurice Hexter, Joseph Willen was appointed Executive Vice-President of the organization in 1942. During his time as Executive Vice-President, Willen actively participated in the merger with the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities (1943-4), the successful Building Fund for Expansion, Modernization, and Research (1945-1947), the significant expansion of services and assistance to veterans, families, and the elderly, and aided in the City of Life Campaign and Building Fund (1962-1967)27. Even before his tenure as Executive Vice-President, Joseph Willen was relied upon as an exceptional and innovative fundraiser. In the article by Jack Wertheimer, “Current Trends in American Jewish Philanthropy,” the author cited Carl Bakal (author of Charity U.S.A.) as suggesting that Joseph Willen invented the practice of publicly calling on a donor to announce how much the donor planned to give, often known as “card-calling,” at fundraising dinners. Willen enlisted the aid of Felix Warburg to begin the practice of “card-calling” in the 1930s at Federation dinners or events. In the Wertheimer article, Willen offers “that for a person to show off his wealth by conspicuous spending … was considered good form, whereas conspicuous giving was considered bad form …” In encouraging conspicuous giving to charity, he proceeded to wonder, “Why couldn't more modest givers also give conspicuously, simply by announcing their gifts?”28. Willen distinguished himself with fundraising practices like “card-calling” and the successful 1944 Campaign without a Fixed Quota, where “[o]ur quota will be the conscience, the foresight, and the courage of the Jewish community … its readiness to prepare for the returning soldier and the needs of the post-war world … its will to build a finer community”29. Throughout his career, Willen brought a level of professionalism to the business of fundraising for a philanthropic organization. Together, Willen and Hexter “organized fundraising campaigns that brought in more than $1 billion” dollars.30

In 1967, Joseph Willen retired from his position as Executive Vice-President to become an Executive Consultant and remained a consultant until the 1980s. He died on July 6, 1988 at Mount Sinai Medical Center, an institution for which Joseph Willen helped expand the mission and raise funds during his tenure as Executive Vice-President of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York.

Footnotes

Subsubsubseries d - David Salten,  bulk 1967—1969.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Executive Director/Executive Vice-Presidents » David Salten

2.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Correspondence files arranged chronologically.

Processing Information:

Salten’s files were discovered in three bankers boxes labeled “General correspondence”, unfoldered and with no indication of whose files or correspondence were contained in the boxes.

Related Material:

  • Executive Vice-Presidents/Sanford Solender, for combined Salten/Solender subject files
  • Other Executive Staff/Dr. Joseph Rappaport, Director of the Research Department, for further information on the Research
        Department
  • Subgroup V – Oral History Project – David G. Salten, for his oral history and transcript

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

David G. Salten’s files consist of general correspondence arranged chronologically by month and year from 1961-1969. Of special interest within his files are details about the establishment of Federation’s Research Department, and Federation’s need for research relating to the emerging needs of the Jewish population in the metropolitan New York area.

Salten’s subject files contain Sanford Solender’s later files on the same subjects; these combined folders exist within the Sanford Solender subsubsubseries.

Biographical Note

Prior to his tenure at Federation from 1965-1969, Salten was as an educator, administrator, and educational reformer in and around the metropolitan New York area. He was a teacher, acting principal, and Superintendent in Long Beach (New York) and then Superintendent of the New Rochelle school system until 1965 when he was hired at Federation. He trained under the retiring Executive Vice-Presidents, Dr. Maurice Hexter and Joseph Willen from 1965-1967 as Executive Director, and served as Executive Vice-President 1967-1969. In his oral history, Salten explained that he was contacted by a Federation Board of Trustees member in 1965 and interviewed by an extensive search committee interested in finding a replacement for Hexter and Willen. With his nationally-recognized prominence and experience as a superintendent, Salten joined the staff of the Federation at a time of transition and change. He had the inauspicious job of assuming the leadership of Federation immediately after two long-serving and beloved “giants”. When asked about the differences and the levels of complexity between his job as a superintendent and his position at Federation, Salten offered that “I don't think anything can compare with the challenge of the school superintendency where you're responsible for all of the children in the city. It wasn't any more challenging than that or more difficult than that. I thought it was, in many ways, more interesting and more diverse … [Federation] dealt with so many aspects of life and dealt with a whole power structure I had been unaccustomed to deal with.”31

Although his time as Executive Vice-President at Federation was short when compared with the tenures of other Executive Vice-Presidents, Salten can be credited with overseeing and setting new records in several successful fundraising campaigns, creating stability during a time of transition in leadership and funding sources, and developing an in-house research department that worked closely with the Committee on Research, the Communal Planning Committee and the Distribution Committee. He left Federation in 1969 and returned to a career in education, leading the New York Institute of Technology as Executive Vice-President and Provost.

Footnote

Subsubsubseries e - Sanford Solender,  bulk 1970—1992.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Executive Director/Executive Vice-Presidents » Sanford Solender

68 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Subject files and Staff files - arranged alphabetically. Within Subject files:

  • Chronological files arranged chronologically by month and alphabetically within the folders
  • Correspondence files arranged alphabetically by year.

Consultant files - arranged alphabetically by subject.

Solender/Kahn Subject and Staff files - arranged alphabetically.

While the folder lists are in order, some of the folders are physically located in different boxes, making it necessary to jump back and forth between boxes. Therefore when requesting boxes, be sure to check for the correct box and folder designation.

On the documents themselves, there are numerous “See” references, either in the corner of a photocopy pointing to a different folder, or a note originally stapled to the inside of the pendaflex, now photocopied and placed at the front of the folder, which may prove helpful in locating related materials.

In most cases, except where necessary to maintain overall consistency in filing, existing alphabetical order was retained. In some cases, similar materials may be scattered – for example, Correspondence with a donor and correspondence with the donor’s foundation may be in very different parts of the alphabet because the foundation files will be filed under the full, legal name, which often begins with a first (not family) name, and the donor correspondence will be filed under the donor’s last name. Also, although in other series, Community Centers and YM-YWHA agencies may be grouped together alphabetically, here you will find that they are scattered through the alphabet by direct name of agency. For example, Associated Ys are filed under “A”, Mid-Island Y is under “M” and the YM-YWHA of Mid-Westchester is under “Y”.

Related Material:

  • Executive Vice-Presidents/David Salten and William Kahn files.
  • Subgroup III - UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Executive/Solender, for administrative details of merging the UJA and
        Federation campaigns in the 1970s.
  • Subgroup IV - UJA-Federation of New York - UJF/Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/Stephen Solender for Sanford Solender’s son
        Stephen’s files as EVP of the merged organization.
  • Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Sanford Solender
  • Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Reynold Levy for information about his relationship with and impressions of Sanford Solender.

P-554, Solender Family Papers
I-337, National Jewish Welfare Board

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The earliest of Sanford Solender’s Subject Files incorporate the files of his predecessor David Salten that were still active when Solender became EVP. In most cases, folder dates prior to 1970 contain Salten documents.

Sanford Solender’s Subject Files are dominated by his extensive Chronological files and Correspondence files. The Chronological files, 1974-1980, contain administrative correspondence and memoranda largely with and/or about agencies and donors; board and staff memoranda; and correspondence with outside organizations. Also in Correspondence is that of the three Federation presidents with whom Solender worked; they did not have separate files maintained at the Federation office (although some of Harry Mancher’s files survived at Mancher’s home and can be found in subseries D – Officers). The three presidents are: Lawrence B. Buttenwieser (1971-1974), Frederick P. Rose (1974-1977) and Harry R. Mancher (1977-1980).

Detail on some of the major subject areas of Sanford Solender’s files can be found here.

Solender’s Staff Files include memoranda and correspondence with various staff members, mostly in a direct reporting relationship with Solender. These files are considered confidential and are closed until 72 years after the most recent document in each folder.

Solender’s Consultant files cover the topics with which he was concerned during the approximately ten years after his retirement, including correspondence with foundations, donors and members of the Board of Trustees; Federation agencies; and outside organizations.

The most recent of Sanford Solender’s Subject Files and Staff Files were similarly commingled, this time with his successor William Kahn’s files. Solender files combined with Kahn’s in the same folders, with dates overlapping both tenures, have been left in this interfiled state. These “Solender/Kahn files” are listed at the end of the Sanford Solender folders in the container list. Although some files may incorporate work of only one or the other, most contain documents from the administrations of both men. Some confidential materials within the Staff Files are restricted due to privacy issues and the folders are labeled accordingly.

Biographical Note:

Sanford Solender was born in Pleasantville, NY in 1914 to Samuel and Catherine (Goldsmith). In 1935 Solender married Ethel Klonick and had four children: Stephen, Peter, Ellen, Susan. He received his BS degree from NYU in 1935 and became a social worker. [Who’s Who, 1988]. He received his MS from Columbia in 1937. Prior to joining Federation, Solender had progressively more responsible jobs in the Jewish communal field:

1935-1942Director of activities at Neighborhood House, Brooklyn, the assistant Headworker at Bronx House and the Headworker at Madison House.
1942-1948Executive Director of the Council for Educational Alliance in Cleveland.
1948-1960Director of the Bureau of Personnel and Training/Director of the Jewish Community Center Division of National Jewish Welfare Board.
1960-1970Executive Vice-President of the National Jewish Welfare Board.

From 1970-1981 Sanford Solender was the Executive Vice-President of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies in New York. During his 11 years at the helm of Federation, Solender was involved with the effective merging of the Federation and UJA campaigns into a formal joint campaign, the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign. During the disastrous fiscal crisis of the 1970s, Solender personally worked with New York City and New York State agencies to ensure that as much money as possible was retained in their distributions to Federation’s social service agencies. And Solender judiciously helped Federation modernize from the organization it was under Hexter and Willen into one capable of dealing with the drug crisis, women’s issues and civil rights. For the second half of Solender’s tenure at Federation he also held the title of EVP at the Joint Campaign, 1975-1981.

In 1986 his son Stephen became Executive Vice-President of newly-merged UJA-Federation of New York. Solender died in 2003. For more information see Sanford Solender’s obituary in the New York Times, September 8, 2003.

Restrictions:

Where information in the staff files is sensitive, the files have been restricted for 72 years from the latest date of a specific file. The container list indicates which folders are restricted.

Subsubsubseries f - William Kahn,  bulk 1981—1986.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Executive Director/Executive Vice-Presidents » William Kahn

9 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

The Solender/Kahn files, which can be found in the container list with the Sanford Solender files, are arranged alphabetically by subject or name. William Kahn’s Subject files and Staff files repeat the same arrangement.

While the folder lists are in order, some of the folders are physically located in different boxes, making it necessary to jump back and forth between boxes. Therefore, when requesting boxes, be sure to check for the correct box and folder designation.

Related Material:

  • Executive Office Staff/Executive Vice-Presidents/Sanford Solender for mixed Solender/Kahn files.
  • Subgroup IV - UJA-Federation of New York – UJF/Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/Kahn, for administrative details of merging the
        two organizations.
  • Subgroup V - Oral History Project – William Kahn

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files of Executive Vice-President William Kahn contain a very broad range of subjects which cover every aspect of Federation business during the five years of his tenure. His files are divided into 2 subsubsubseries, Subject Files and Staff Files.

Biographical Note:

William Kahn succeeded Sanford Solender as Executive Vice President (EVP) of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York in 1981, and led Federation through the process of merging with United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York. He left Federation in 1986 to become the EVP of the Federation in St. Louis as the merger in New York took effect. William Kahn died in 2013 at 87. His obituary can be found here.

Restrictions:

Where information in the staff files is sensitive, the files have been restricted for 72 years from the latest date of a specific file.

Subsubseries ii - Other Executive Staff, 1950—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Other Executive Staff

34.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four Subsubsubseries, alphabetical by last name.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Subsubseries "Other Executive Staff" includes the files of professional support staff who worked directly with the lay leadership and Executive Vice-Presidents of Federation.

Subsubsubseries a - Milton (Mickey) Levine,  1949—1973.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Other Executive Staff » Milton (Mickey) Levine

15.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Mickey Levine’s files as Executive Secretary reflect his close work with Board of Trustees members and members of Board committees including the Administrative Committee, Committees on Development and Fundraising, Executive Committee, and the Committee on Social Legislation, among others. His correspondence with lay and staff leadership covers issues largely relating to his work with the committees.

Historical Note:

The blog post “Mickey Levine’s Quandary”, describes some of what Mickey Levine’s role was at Federation.

Subsubsubseries b - Elaine Morris,  1975—1986.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Other Executive Staff » Elaine Morris

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Elaine Morris’s files as Director of the Executive Office reflect her many administrative responsibilities in coordinating the work of the Executive Office and working as a close associate of the Executive Vice-President. A small group of files having to do with Federation’s study of Day Care issues among the Jewish community and within the affiliated agencies reflects her area of interest in the social services field before becoming an executive administrator.

Subsubsubseries c - Joseph Rappaport,  1950—1974.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Other Executive Staff » Joseph Rappaport

7 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Joseph Rappaport interacted with many other departments in his position as Director of the Research Department, begun by Executive Vice-President David Salten in about 1966.

Subsubsubseries d - Edward Vajda,  1963—1974.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Other Executive Staff » Edward Vajda

9 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Edward Vajda’s files reflect his involvement with fundraising. He appears to have worked closely with the professional leadership within the Executive Office. Vajda was also involved with fundraising for the Joint Campaign in Subgroup III.

Subsubseries iii - Departments—Personal Service Department (restricted), 1955—1968

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Departments—Personal Service Department (restricted)

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological and then alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files consist almost entirely of correspondence; because of the personal nature of this correspondence, the files are restricted by folder until 72 years from the most recent material within a folder.

Historical Note:

The Personal Service Department existed at Federation from its founding, originally as a committee. The files found here consist primarily of correspondence between community members and staff and lay leadership at Federation. The letter writers were asking for specific help getting a parent or other friend or relative into the right facility for care with the Federation network. Very often the letter-writer had had a personal introduction to an executive or lay leader at Federation and used this connection to ask for help with payment or bypassing a waiting line. In the mid-to-late 1980s the Jewish Resource Center (also seen titled the Jewish Information and Referral Service (JIRS), 1984-1986) took over some of the functions of the Personal Service Department, but in a more professional manner. In the 2010s a similar department was named J-1-1 Information and Referral Center (911 for Jewish information), and provided information on many Jewish topics, still geared towards Federation services but more about programming and less about medical issues.

Series 2 - Administration, 1913—1994 (bulk 1917—1986)

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration

The Series is in English.
378 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Administration Series, 1917-1986, contains three subseries: Administrative, Financial and Legal Files of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies.

Subseries A. Administrative Materials – this subseries contains primarily the files of the Director of Administration, with a few Miscellaneous items and four folders from the Personnel Department. More detail is below.

Subseries B. Finance and Budget – this subseries is extremely large at 188 Bankers Boxes. It contains a huge number of files that document in great detail the distribution of funds by Federation to the affiliated agencies over the 70 years of Federation’s existence. Each of the seven Subsubseries within Finance and Budget is described in detail below.

Subseries C. Legal Department – this subseries contains a selected number of files of general research value: Federation’s Estate file of Lorenz Hart, and many of Federation’s files on the Wilder v. Sugarman case. Additional files on this case, which continued for many years, are scattered throughout Subgroups I and IV. More detail on this subseries can be found below.

Subseries A - Administrative Materials, 1944—1987

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Administrative Materials

9.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Subseries A. Administrative Materials – this subseries contains primarily the files of the Director of Administration, with a few Miscellaneous items and four folders from the Personnel Department. More detail is in the subsubseries descriptions below.

Subsubseries i - Directors of Administration, 1944—1987

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Administrative Materials » Directors of Administration

9.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by Director’s name and then alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files of two Directors of Administration are found in this subsubseries – Philip Gartenberg, whose files have a date range of 1982-1988; and Robert Goldfeld, whose files have a date range of 1976-1983. Actual beginning and end dates for Directors of Administration could not be discovered from the available materials.

Historical Note:

Robert Goldfeld worked as Director of Administration (variously called Executive Director of Administration) for both Federation and the Joint Campaign from the late 1970s to 1983. Philip Gartenberg worked as Director of Administration from about 1984-1985, apparently having replaced Robert Goldfeld in this position.

Subsubseries ii – Miscellaneous, 1961—1980

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Administrative Materials » Miscellaneous

2 Folders.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Two miscellaneous files contain directories and other information issued by the Administration Department.

Subsubseries iii — Personnel Department, 1944—1983

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Administrative Materials » Personnel Department

4 Folders.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This subsubseries contains four folders from the Personnel Department, 1944-1955, 1975-1983. In addition to documentation on personnel policies and benefits, there are two files on transfers, promotions and staff status. Nothing in the files is confidential.

Subseries B — Finance and Budget, 1913—1988

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Finance and Budget

364.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically in seven subsubseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project - Phillip Friedman

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This subseries is arranged in seven subsubseries:

The Financial Reports contain audited reports from many Jewish accounting firms working in New York through the 70 years of these records.

Some of the earliest budget files, 1917-1925, are from the first Executive Director’s office, I. Edwin Goldwasser. Other early agency budget files, 1939-1945, can be found in Series 1 – Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/Hexter/Subject and Budget Files.

Historical Note:

The Finance and Budget Departments at Federation held very different roles. Most of the files in this Subseries are from the Budget Department, and more information was gleaned about the details of that department than the Finance Department; most of this note will reflect that.

The Budget Directors:

  • Simon Loeb, 1917 to 1920 when he founded the accounting firm of Loeb & Troper
  • T.D. Zuckerman, 1921 to 1923
  • Solomon (Sam) Cutler, 1924 to 1941
  • Jerome Saltz, 1941 to 1971
  • Jack Applebaum, 1971 to 1976 when he was promoted to Comptroller and Assistant Secretary to the Board of Trustees
  • Phillip Friedman – 1977 to about 1989

Subsubseries i — Annual Agency Files, 1917—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Finance and Budget » Annual Agency Files

188 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in chronological order by year or fiscal year.

Within each year, the agencies are arranged by Functional group, and within each group are arranged alphabetically by agency name. This file order mirrors the order used when still in active use by the Budget Department.

While the folder lists are in order, some of the folders are physically located in different boxes, making it necessary to jump back and forth between boxes. Therefore when requesting boxes, be sure to check for the correct box and folder designation.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Annual Agency Files, created by Federation’s budget department, contain the budgets of agencies prepared for presentation to the Distribution Committee, and the Distribution Committee's final grants to agencies.

The budget material is rich with financial information such as itemized yearly expenditures as well as correspondence that provides evidence as to how these agencies operated during a particular fiscal year, and how Federation staff interacted with agency staff. The correspondence includes letters between Federation budget directors and budget committee chairs of the particular agencies, as well as correspondence between Solomon Lowenstein, Maurice Hexter, lay leaders of Federation and the Executive Directors of these agencies. For most of the agencies for a particular fiscal year, there was an analysis of the increase or decrease in the Federation appropriated budget as originally voted.

Each folder for a particular agency in the Budget Materials – Annual Agency files subsubseries includes the name of the functional group as part of the folder title, together with the name of the agency; In addition, agency numbers were retained whenever possible. For instance, the agency Surprise Lake Camp appears on the folder as VII. Camps – Surprise Lake Camp (106).

Historical Note:

In Federation's earliest years they funded 80-90 agencies each year. The number of agencies grew over the years. In the oral history of Phillip Friedman, the Federation and then UJA-Federation Budget Director from 1977 to 1989, Friedman mentions that the total number of affiliated agencies grew to 130. His oral history includes interesting, detailed information on the budget department, specific staff and lay board members he worked with and general information about Federation during his tenure.32 In 1961, Federation funded the most agencies of any year in its long history, 116.

The first director of the Federation Budget Department was Simon "Solomon" Loeb, who served from 1917 to 1920. He was succeeded by T.D. Zuckerman, whose term lasted from 1921 to 1923. Following Zuckerman was Solomon "Sam" J. Cutler, who served for 17 years from 1924 to 1941. Cutler was succeeded by Jerome L. Saltz, whose tenure lasted from 1941 to 1971, the longest of any of the budget directors. Saltz was followed by Jack Applebaum who served from 1971 to 1976. Phillip A. Friedman succeeded Applebaum and served as budget director from 1977, through the merger with UJA, until 1989. More on the UJA-Federation budget department can be found in other subsubseries within the Finance and Budget subseries.

Because of the large number of agencies, categories called "functional groups" were created, making it possible for staff members in the Budget Department and in other Agency Support departments to specialize in one social service area such as medical or camping. The categories evolved as the number of agencies and types of services provided changed. The name of each functional group precedes the agency name in each folder title in the container list below.

The functional groupings of the agencies reflected not only how Federation chose to think about, interact with, service and fund their affiliated agencies, but also how affiliated groups such as the Greater New York Fund, outside of Federation, dealt with agencies. Changes in the names of the functional groups reflected changes in the functions of these agencies themselves, which in turn reflected the needs of the communities Federation constantly strove to meet. For historical detail on the evolution of the functional group names, please click here.

Footnote

Subsubseries ii – Budget Department Subject Files, 1917—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Finance and Budget » Budget Department Subject Files

47.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Budget Department Subject Files are the administrative files maintained by the Budget Department through every administration of Budget Director. They do not include material that is in other subsubseries, such as Financial Reports or the Annual Agency Files. The Subject Files are a good source of information on many topics covered by the Board of Trustees that involved the agency budgeting process. These files include correspondence with the affiliated agencies, budget conference minutes for specific agencies and many committee files and minutes including Distribution Committee subcommittees, Functional Committee and Level of Grants Committee. Please note that additional files exist for many of the Functional Groups, as well as those listed above under Functional Committee.

Budget Subject Files from the office of Executive Vice-President (EVP) Maurice Hexter can also be found here. They predate his arrival at Federation, and most likely represent some of the early EVPs’ subject files surrounding agency budget issues, approximately 1917 to 1945.

The Engineering and Maintenance files and Equipment files are an interesting group of files that do not exist anywhere else in the collection and that give great detail on the physical plant conditions of the many of the aging agency buildings.

Special Funds files complement related files in Series 3/Subseries C/Subsubseries vi – Resources and Development.

Some files are unique to accounting and budget calculations, including Calculation of Budget; Reserves; Statistical Data and Reports; various Studies on budgetary issues; and Tables – both Cost and Ratio Tables for Hospitals.

Additional information on the Budget Department Subject Files can be found here.

Historical Note:

The Budget Department was involved in every issue that Federation was involved with if it required a budget. In addition to maintaining files on these issues, members of the Budget Department carried on their own studies and surveys in order to be able to put budgets together for complex projects such as multi-agency facility renovations, boiler or window replacements or the cost of oil versus coal across many ages and conditions of heating systems. The fact that these subject files were retained permanently by the Budget Department provides the researcher with a different perspective on many of Federation’s projects.

Subsubseries iii – Controller’s Office, 1968—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Finance and Budget » Controller's Office

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The various Controllers at Federation most often spelled the title as it is listed here. From time to time it is spelled Comptroller, often more common outside of Federation, but we have retained Federation’s spelling for consistency.

The files in this subsubseries contain what appear to be fragmentary records of Hyman Smith’s tenure as Controller, mostly in the years leading up to the 1986 merger with UJA.

Historical Note:

The Controller manages the Accounting Department.

Subsubseries iv – Distribution Committee, 1940—1982

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Finance and Budget » Distribution Committee

52.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged into 3 groups of records:

  • Subject Files - Alphabetical and then Chronological by subject
  • Items for Special Consideration – Chronological
  • Reports of Budget Department to Distribution Committee – Numerical by number of Functional Group and then alphabetical by name of agency
Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Some of these files may duplicate similar Distribution Committee files elsewhere in the collection, but there may be additional information, including handwritten notes, in these particular sets of records that do not exist elsewhere.

Historical Note:

For an explanation of the Distribution Committee, see the Historical Note in Series 1.

Subsubseries v – Financial Reports, 1913—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Finance and Budget » Financial Reports

48 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged into 3 subsubsubseries:

  • Subsubsubseries a - Agency Financial Reports – Chronological by date range, and then numerically by number of Functional Group and then alphabetical by name of agency. Date ranges are roughly these: 1918-1924; 1925-1945; 1960-1969; 1970-1984
  • Subsubsubseries b - Audited Agency Reports – Chronological by date range, and then alphabetical by name of agency or numerical by number of Functional Group.
    Date ranges are roughly these: Dates beginning with the years 1919-1942; 1941-1950; by Functional Group, 1945-1986
  • Subsubsubseries c - Federation Financial Reports – alphabetical
Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Subsubsubseries a – Agency Financial Reports – reports from each of the affiliated agencies.
The financial reports are mostly annual, with some reporting semi-annually. Some of the files include accompanying correspondence and reference information.

As described in the Arrangement section above, agency financial report files are arranged in date ranges that reflect the way they were filed and stored by the Budget Department. Every five or ten or twenty years a group of reports were packed together; due to the restrictions of minimal processing this arrangement has been retained. Within these date ranges, the files are arranged in Functional Groups using the numbers of the functional groups used at the time for many of the budget department reports and files:

  • I.      Child Care
  • II.     Care of Aged
  • III.    Medical Care
  • IV.    Family, Children, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services
  • V.     Religious Education
  • VI.    Community Center Activities
  • VII.   Fresh Air Work / Camps
  • VIII.  Subventions

Within each Functional Group the agencies are listed alphabetically by name of agency. In years when an agency’s name changed, the agency is listed under the new name, with the previous name included in the notes column.

Please be aware that there is a possibility of inconsistencies in the order or names of the functional groups through the decades because of administrative differences among the budget department staff when these materials were created and used.

If searching for one particular agency, please be aware that later files may exist in the following date range grouping. A large amount of financial and budgetary information on a given agency can be found by checking in each of the subsubseries in Subseries B – Finance and Budget.

Subsubsubseries b – Audited Agency Reports – audited reports from the agencies.
The arrangement follows the way the records were originally arranged, and several successive alphabetical listings within this subsubsubseries require careful searching for titles of interest.

Subsubsubseries c – Federation Financial Reports – reports of Federation’s own operating costs.
This subsubsubseries is arranged by subject. Many of the files are annual publications from the Budget Department, “Analysis of Experience of Beneficiary Societies” (later titled “Financial Experience of Affiliated Societies”), which are compilations of financial data going back to 1939. This format of analysis was discontinued soon after Jerome Saltz’s retirement as Budget Director in 1971. One booklet has been digitized, from the budget year 1958-1959.

Other materials include auditors’ reports for Federation’s annual financial statements, and several editions of the report "Grants to Societies in the Years 1917 through 1947-48", one of which has been digitized.

Historical Note:

Each Agency prepared Financial Reports annually which were required to be audited by a Certified Public Accountant once they were finalized. The reports here represent a selection of three different financial reports.

Subsubseries vi – Functional Committees, 1948—1969

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Finance and Budget » Functional Committees

1.5 Bankers Boxes
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Contained here are budgetary reports of some of the Functional Committees, 1949-1969. Other Functional Committee files can be found in Series 3 - Community Services/Subseries C – Functional Groups, which are arranged by functional group.

Historical Note:

The Functional Committees were subcommittees organized by agency Functional Group, seen in the Annual Agency Files in this subseries. The subcommittees would meet to discuss issues of importance connected with a particular Functional Group. For example, the Camping Committee, composed of members of the Board of Trustees, many of whom were professional and lay leaders at the camp agencies, as well as professional staff from Federation in the Camping department, such as Asher Melzer, the long-time Consultant on Camping.

Subsubseries vii – Greater New York Fund Subject Files, 1937—1988

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Finance and Budget » Greater New York Fund Subject Files

26 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subsubsubseries: Chronological Files, Agency Files, Annual Campaign Files and Subject Files.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Contained in the Chronological Files are Agency files arranged by year, 1941-1947. The Agency Files, primarily GNYF forms and applications, are alphabetical, approximately 1950s-1986. The Annual Campaign Files contains selection of files of Greater New York Fund campaign, 1943-1979.

Historical Note:

The United Hospital Fund was founded by hospital trustees and other concerned New Yorkers in 1879 to organize charitable support for voluntary, nonprofit hospitals in New York City and to help solve shared problems. This fund has played a central role in addressing critical health care issues facing New York, and in the founding of many of the organizations and institutions that today help define the city’s health care landscape, including the Greater New York Hospital Association, Empire BlueCross BlueShield, United Way of New York City, and the New York Blood Center. More recently, the Fund has supported the creation of the Primary Care Development Corporation, New York City AIDS Fund, New York Society for Health Planning, and New York Cares.

In 1938, the Fund joined with other major fundraising groups to form the Greater New York Fund, now United Way of New York City.

Since 1938 “the Fund has become the largest single contributor to practically all of its participating agencies, including the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies in New York City, the Catholic Charities of New York, the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies and the Community Service Society…the Fund in its first three years of life has raised approximately $11M.” (“Purpose” from handbook scanned for Blog).33

See also a blog post on The Greater New York Fund.

“The fund raises money for 56 voluntary, nonprofit hospitals here. In a period of escalating hospital costs, Mr. Adams wrote in 1962, the UHF, the Greater New York Fund and the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies produce “the essential ‘gap-bridging’ 8 per cent” of the institutions’ budgets”.34

Today UHF is a funded agency of the GNYF [United Way].

Footnotes

Subseries C – Legal Department, 1925—1994

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Legal Department

4 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries, Legacies and Wilder v. Sugarman.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Legacies subsubseries contains solely the files on the Estate of Lorenz Hart. The Wilder v. Sugarman files detail Federation’s involvement in a class action lawsuit on behalf of foster children.

Subsubseries i – Legacies, 1925—1974

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Legal Department » Legacies

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Contained in the Legacies files are legal documentation from the will and estate of Lorenz Hart including some information about the copyright of some of Hart’s songs.

Historical Note:

The Legacy Department at Federation permanently maintained files on every bequest left to Federation after a donor’s death. The only Estate file that has become part of the archives is that of the estate of Lorenz Hart, the lyricist in the song-writing team of Rogers and Hart in the 1920s until his death in 1943.

Subsubseries ii – Wilder v. Sugarman, 1968—1994

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Administration » Legal Department » Wilder v. Sugarman

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Contained here are the Wilder v. Sugarman files from Joyce Dubensky’s office as General Counsel of Federation, 1984-1986, many of which are mixed within her folders with documents from David Liederman who also worked on the case as Director of Government Relations, approximately 1979 to 1984/5. Karl Zukerman’s files are the earliest, as he was Liederman’s predecessor in the Government Relations department in the 1970s.

Historical Note:

Originally titled “Wilder v. Sugarman”, the lawsuit on behalf of foster children in New York City continued long enough to have several different related names, including “Wilder v. Bernstein”; many of Federation’s files on this case are contained here. The following is from the National Center for Youth Law website: “This class action was filed [in 1973] on behalf of black, Protestant children in need of foster care in New York City. Plaintiffs alleged that religiously-affiliated child care agencies provided foster care services with public funds in violation of the Establishment and Free Exercise Clauses of the First Amendment, and that policies of racial and religious matching of foster children denied equal access to services in violation of the Equal Protection Clause.

“Plaintiffs settled in l986 after the parties and an intervening group of non-sectarian agencies agreed on a stipulation that mandated widespread reform of New York City's foster care system to improve the quality of services available to all children. In addition to eliminating discrimination and protecting free exercise rights, the stipulation required professional evaluations of children when they come into care; rational placement of children on a first come, first served basis; a system for ranking the comparative quality of agencies; and "meaningful access" for foster children to family planning and abortion. The district court approved the settlement on April 28, 1987.35

These files and others in Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation – UJF/Government Relations/Foster Care – Wilder v. Bernstein include the following information on the subject:

Federation’s action in the case derived from the following principles:

  • 1. “That every child has the right to high quality child care services, irrespective of the child’s race, religion or national background.”
  • 2. “That sectarian groups have the right to establish agencies to provide child care programs in which preference in admission is given to members of the sponsoring group, with service extended to others to the full extent possible within this framework.”
  • 3. “Child care agencies established by sectarian groups … are entitled to reimbursement by government for the care which is provided …”

The case was settled in 1986 but related cases citing Wilder continued until 2001, as New York City and its child care agencies struggled to comply with the settlement.

A good, concise document in UJF/Government Relations/Foster Care - Wilder v. Bernstein is the “brief history” sent to the Distribution Committee by the subcommittee on Human Services shortly after the 1986 decision: “NYCLU filed first suit in 1973 against “various officials of New York City and New York State, as well as against Catholic and Jewish and, at the time, Protestant (the Protestant agencies were subsequently dismissed from the action) affiliated child care agencies, on behalf of a minor, Shirley Wilder and others.” Although a ruling a year later by a 3-judge Federal panel, that “providing for placement of children consistent with their … religious heritage” was constitutional. Unfortunately that did not help solve the problem of the original plaintiffs. In 1986 “plaintiffs and the City agreed to a proposed settlement that would … provide for placements in the agencies on a “first-come, first-served” basis, and if necessary create a waiting list for children in need of residential care who desire placement in an agency of the child’s faith.”

Footnote

Series 3 – Agencies and Support/Community Services, 1929—1995

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services

438 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subseries.

Processing Information:

The Agencies and Support/Community Services series is voluminous and the arranging and describing of these files began and continued before all of the boxes from this series had been opened. It was unclear at the beginning of the process exactly how departments fit within the division's hierarchy through time. Because of the constraints of minimal processing, once a decision was made as to how to arrange a specific group of files, that arrangement could not be changed later.

Please note that from the container list it is possible to look at related files that may be in different subseries by searching the entire container list for a specific department (e.g., camping), agency name, or subject, no matter where those files actually exist physically.

Related Material:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The four subseries in Agencies and Support/Community Services are:

This series contains the files of the staff professionals who worked directly with Federation's affiliated agencies. The structure of the Community Services group changed and adapted to the evolving role of Federation in servicing the agencies and the growth or reduction in the size of the staff in a given service agency.

Because of the original order of the files from a specific department, the arrangement varies. The files in subseries A and B are arranged by the person who created the files; subseries C is arranged by the functional group that office worked with - medical and aged, community development, community centers and camping, etc. For detailed information on functional groups, please refer to this document. Subseries D is arranged by agency. All of the files in subseries A, B and C were created by Federation staff within the Community Services division; the files in subseries D were created by the agencies themselves, and were transferred to Federation after the agency dissolved.

Eventually Community Services included Government Relations in addition to variations on the Functional Groups; neither Government Relations files nor the Budget Department files, are located in Series 3. Budget Department files are in Series 2 and Government Relations files are in Series 4.

Historical Note:

Agencies and Support/Community Services were the divisions at Federation that managed the day to day issues involved with Federation’s affiliated agencies. The cluster worked closely with the Board of Trustees committees that did long-term planning and set the policies and budgets for how Federation serviced the agencies both as a group and individually. The committees were Building Fund (including City of Life), Communal Planning Committee (CPC) and Distribution Committee, and their subcommittees, including the subcommittees of the Functional Committee. (see Series 2 – Administration)

The origins of the grouping are unclear, but it is likely that it was Martha Selig who, working together with co-Executive Vice-Presidents Maurice Hexter and Joseph Willen, saw a need for professional staff who would work directly with the agencies, developing budgets and aiding in the management of programs. Around the early 1970s, as the staffing and management grew, what had been known generally as ‘supporting the agencies’ came to be called Community Services.

Details from a 1982 memorandum show the growth of Agencies and Support/Community Services and staff that fell under its auspices between 1970 and 1982.

The blog post “Mission Statement of the Community Services Division, 1983” is one of the clearest descriptions of the cluster, written just three years before Federation merged with UJA.

Explore the agencies on the Federation City interactive map, which includes dates, addresses, histories and photographs of many of Federation’s affiliated agencies through the 20th century.

Subseries A – Executive Staff – Directors, 1942—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Executive Staff – Directors

64 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged chronologically in the order in which the Director held the position.

Related Material:

Executive/Committees of the Board for earlier Martha Selig files

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The four Directors of Community Services with files in this subseries, including their years in the position are:

Melvin Mogulof, Director of Community Services, held the position for less than two years and his files are combined with those of his successor, Donald Feldstein.

The files of the Directors of Community Services are dominated by those of Martha Selig. They contain enormous amounts of correspondence with agency leadership, memoranda with Federation staff in every department and division, and reports and surveys created by Federation or other organizations to help understand the changing needs of the agencies and the agencies' clientele. Also included in the files are minutes of the Distribution Committee and Functional Committee subcommittees and reports to these subcommittees with recommendations as to which specific projects and programs at the agencies should be funded. Members of the Community Services division attended budget meetings at which these programs and projects were discussed; the components of each agency's budget was calculated based on the Community Services staff's knowledge of each agency, and their ability to prioritize needs within the constraints of that fiscal year's total budget.

Historical Note:

The Directors of the Community Services division managed a large staff of social service professionals, many with undergraduate and graduate degrees in social work or related fields, plus a large support staff. The division was generally organized by functional group, and the staff became experts in that field if they had not come to the position with subject expertise.

The Executive Directors of the Community Services Division:

1950s to 1974Martha Selig
1974 to 1976Melvin Mogulof
1976 to 1981Donald Feldstein
1981 to 1985Dr. Jacob (Jack) B. Ukeles
1985 to 1986Dr. Lewis C. Chartock

Melvin Mogulof held the position for less than two years and his files are combined with those of his successor, Donald Feldstein.

The files of the Directors of Community Services are dominated by those of Martha Selig. Selig's files first appear in the Executive Division, where she served as secretary (or staff representative) to the Building Fund, the Communal Planning Committee and the Distribution Committee of the Board of Trustees beginning in the 1940s. Unusual for a woman in the 1940s and 1950s, Selig eventually became Director of the department that supported the agencies, that eventually became the Community Services division. The title of the head of the division changed frequently, especially in the 1970s and 1980s as Selig's successors came and went with greater frequency. As the division grew and each functional group assumed its own professional staff, the position of Director of Community Services became more and more complex. A memorandum in Stephanie Newman’s files in Resources and Development, dated 1982, from Joyce Levi to members of the Internal Management Committee, enumerates the increase in staff from 1970 to 1982:

  • 1970 – 12 staff members reported to Martha Selig
  • 1972 – 16 staff members reported to Martha Selig
  • 1976 – 18 staff members reported to Donald Feldstein
  • 1982 – 36 staff members reported to Jack Ukeles

Subsubseries i – Martha Selig, 1942—1977

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Executive Staff – Directors » Martha Selig

31.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubsubseries, both arranged alphabetically:

  • Agencies
  • Subject Files

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Martha Selig

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Martha Selig’s files as Director of Community Services range from 1946 to 1975 when she retired from Federation. More than half of the files of the Directors of Community Services are those of Martha Selig. The Agency files contain correspondence with the leadership of agencies in all functional groups, plus budgetary issues and printed materials issued by the agencies. The subject files cover Selig’s correspondence and involvement with outside organizations such as the New York Jewish Child Care Council, New York City Government agencies, the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds. Also included are extensive files on Federation committees and subcommittees and departments with which Selig interacted on a regular basis.

Biographical Note:

Martha Selig began working at Federation in approximately 1948. She held many positions in her early years at Federation, including secretary to the Building Fund, 1950s, and similar positions with other committees of the Board of Trustees, including the Communal Planning Committee (CPC) and the Distribution Committee (DC). Selig's Federation files first appear in the Executive Division (Series 1), from her years working with these committees. Unusual for a woman in the 1940s and 1950s, Selig eventually became Director of the department that supported the agencies, which eventually became the Community Services division. She was the Director (later, Executive Director) for Community Services, from the late 1950s or the early 1960s until 1974. The title of the head of the division changed frequently, especially in the 1970s and 1980s as Selig's successors came and went with greater frequency. She announced her retirement to the Distribution Committee on February 21, 1974 as of the following June, after 35 years with FJP. Through the 1980s Selig ran a consulting business in the health and welfare services field. Some of her correspondence from her years as an outside consultant appears in Community Services files from the late 1970s and 1980s.

This blog post, “Another Missing Box Appears – Martha Selig”, provides additional information on Martha Selig’s role in Community Services.

An article by Martha Selig from 1956, “Changes in Child Care and their Implications”, shows that she was already seriously involved in social service work through Federation’s affiliated agencies by the mid-1950s.

Subsubseries ii – Donald Feldstein, 1958—1981

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Executive Staff – Directors » Donald Feldstein

26.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubsubseries, both arranged alphabetically:

  • Agencies
  • Subject Files

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Donald Feldstein

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Nearly half of the files in Community Services are those of Donald Feldstein. Working in the position of Director of Community Services for six years, his files include those of his predecessor, Melvin Mogulof. His files include correspondence with outside organizations including various funds and foundations, whose grants were becoming more important to the income of Federation; and memoranda between Feldstein and his staff as well as other departmental professionals, and minutes and reports of Federation committees and subcommittees.

Biographical Note:

Donald Feldstein was Director of Community Services from 1976 to 1981. He had regular meetings with the consultants who worked for him (the directors of their respective functional groups and departments), which he referred to as the “Gang of 7” (Phillip Friedman, Joseph Harris, Saul Hofstein, David Liederman, Asher Melzer, Stephanie Newman and Al Schwarz) and, later, as the “Gang of 9”.

Subsubseries iii – Dr. Jacob (Jack) B. Ukeles, 1966—1984

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Executive Staff – Directors » Dr. Jacob (Jack) B. Ukeles

3.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup V - Oral History Project – Jacob B. Ukeles

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Ukeles’ Subject Files contain information on the Communal Planning Committee and its Subcommittee on Cable TV and Video Technology, the Distribution Committee and its Subcommittee on Services to Russian Refugees, Population and Demographic studies and correspondence with Lawrence Kobrin, chairman of the Distribution Committee in the early 1980s.

Biographical Note:

Dr. Jacob (Jack) B. Ukeles was the Executive Director for Community Services, 1981-5. He left Federation in 1985 and started his own consulting firm; he later became an outside consultant for UJA-Federation of New York where some of his reports can be found.

Subsubseries iv – Dr. Lewis C. Chartock, 1979—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Executive Staff – Directors » Dr. Lewis C. Chartock

2.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Chartock’s files, less than one Bankers Box, contain a portion of his files on a range of topics from his year or two in the position.

Biographical Note:

Dr. Lewis C. Chartock was Director of Federation’s Wiener Educational Center under Judy Lang from 1983 to about 1985. From 1985 to 1986 Chartock was Executive Director of Community Services, replacing Jack Ukeles. Chartock resigned in 1986 at the time of the merger reorganization to work at one of the Federation agencies.

Subseries B – Staff – Other Staff, 1962—1984

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Other Staff

21 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subsubseries in alphabetical order by staff member's last name.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The four staff members with files in this subseries are:

The four staff members with files in this subseries worked in a variety of departments while at Federation. Most of their files are found here, with additional files scattered throughout the departments where they worked for varying amounts of time. Storfer and Zukerman were "Associates", who worked in supportive roles in different departments as needs and budgets changed. Eisen and Waxman were in positions of more authority but also worked in various departments, some of which were created on an ad hoc basis as a need became apparent and funding was allocated. An example of this would be Eisen’s work in Community Organization as well as in the Comprehensive Health Planning Agency (CHPA) and as Director of the William E. Wiener Center for Jewish Communal Service of Federation.

Subsubseries i – Arnold Eisen, 1969—1977

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Other Staff » Arnold Eisen

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subsubsubseries, alphabetical by title; arranged alphabetically within title.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Eisen’s files contain subject files from his roles as Consultant on Services Development, Consultant on Comprehensive Health Planning Agency and one file as Director of Federation’s William E. Wiener Center for Jewish Communal Service.

Eisen’s work in Community Organization was related to that of Storfer and Waxman as their departments and roles were reorganized through the 1970s and into the 1980s.

Biographical Note:

Eisen’s earliest Federation files are from his position as a half-time consultant to the Federation Agency Executives Committee (FAEC) on Federation participation on the Comprehensive Health Planning Agency (CHPA) district boards, from September 1972 to about 1976. The federal government’s goal, through CHPA, was to consolidate federal grants to the states and allow states the flexibility to design their own public health programs.36 Local agencies were responsible for the review of all proposals for health programs, services, and facilities in a given district. As consultant in this area, Eisen encouraged leaders from affiliated agencies to represent Federation on the local CHPA planning boards. The results were disappointing. (from Eisen’s Fall 1972 report to the FAEC)

Eisen took on another part-time job as Director of the William E. Wiener Educational Center for Jewish Communal Service of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, from Sept 1974 to 1976. He was also the Federation Consultant on Community Organization, 1975-77. And Eisen may have taken over some of David Waxman’s responsibilities in the Services Department (Committee on Jews in the Inner City, Metropolitan NY Coordinating Council (MNYCC) on Jewish Poverty) circa 1972-1975.

A September 1974 memorandum from Melvin Mogulof to members of the Building Fund explained that Eisen’s role in Community Organization included his role as a member of the Subcommittee on Community Councils of the Communal Planning Committee; as liaison with the Metropolitan NY Coordinating Council on Jewish Poverty; and as the Federation liaison to CHPA. At some point Eisen became part of Joseph Harris’s Community Centers staff.

Eisen wrote Federation’s 1977 President’s Message, which gave some description of his work as Consultant on Services Development. He said that a reason for Federation’s new focus on communities rather than individuals or groups or agencies was to counteract Arafat’s UN statement in 1974 equating Zionism with Racism. Federation was putting resources into creating Jewish community councils throughout greater NYC, encouraging the participation and election of agency officials to community boards and health planning boards in order to have an impact on the decisions that would affect the total community in which Federation’s agencies provided services. Federation believed that there was a link between community organization, community relations and community support that justified extending their traditional service to individuals and groups, to service to whole communities.

By 1998-1999 Eisen was Executive Vice-President of Bronx Jewish Community Council.

Footnote

Subsubseries ii – Linda Feigenbaum Storfer, 1969—1983

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Other Staff » Linda Feigenbaum Storfer

7 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subsubsubseries, alphabetical by title; arranged alphabetically within title.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Storfer’s three groups of files, about 1978 to 1982, are from the Community Services Committee on Community Centers (CSC-CC); the Government and Community Relations Department - Jewish Community Councils; and general Subject Files from the Government and Community Relations Department.

Biographical Note:

Linda Storfer was an Associate in the Community Services Division, approximately 1978 to 1982, with several areas of specialization: Associate in the Community Services Committee on Community Centers (CSC-CC); Associate specializing in Jewish Community Councils in the Government and Community Relations Department; and general Associate maintaining the Government and Community Relations Department’s Subject Files.

Subsubseries iii – David Waxman, 1962—1975

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Other Staff » David Waxman

5.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Waxman’s files are primarily from his position as Consultant on Services Development, 1971-1975, but may include files from his other roles in Community Services, 1971-1975.

Biographical Note:

David Waxman held a number of roles within the Community Services Division, some overlapping. He was Executive Assistant for Planning and later Planning Associate, 1972-1975; he was a Consultant/ Social Planning Staff within the Services Development Department in 1974 (possibly from 1971-1975). Melvin Mogulof appears to have created the Services Development Department, which he defined at a Building Fund Program Committee meeting in September 1974 as pulling together the work of the Subventions Subcommittee of the Distribution Committee; the Jews in the Inner City Subcommittee of the Distribution Committee; the Building Fund Program Committee; and the Community Studies ad hoc Committee.

Subsubseries iv – Rhea Karlin Zukerman, 1973—1984

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Other Staff » Rhea Karlin Zukerman

5.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subsubsubseries, alphabetical by title; arranged alphabetically within title.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Zukerman’s files include information on fundraising done on an organized, regular basis among members of the boards of Federation’s affiliated agencies; and in recruiting new agency board members.

Biographical Note:

Zukerman was an Associate in Community Services, with responsibility for Agency Board Fundraising (including Joint Campaign fundraising among Federation agency executives), Agency Board Recruitment and Miscellaneous Subject files, about 1978-1981. She was the liaison to the Jewish Community Councils, and appears to have been a Staff Associate for Community Involvement in 1979, where she had some responsibility for the Committee on Jewish Information Services. While at Federation she married Government Relations consultant Karl Zukerman in about 1979.

Subseries C – Functional Groups, 1929—1995

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups

339.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in six subsubseries alphabetically by name of Functional Group.

Processing Information:

Community Centers, Camping & Jewish Education, in particular, were moving targets in terms of which agencies would fall within which Functional Group long enough to create a meaningful arrangement. Complicating matters is that one consultant may have held a variety of portfolios at different times. For example: Joseph Harris was at times responsible for just Camping; when he received a promotion with responsibility for Camping, Community Centers and Jewish Education, his later files were interfiled with his earlier files, making it necessary to combine all three of these areas into one subsubseries.

Related Material:

Administration/Finance and Budget/Annual Agency Files for additional files on each agency. Additional agency budget materials can be found elsewhere in Executive/Executive Committee Minutes.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Functional Groups included in this subseries are the following:

As mentioned in the Historical Note for this subseries, the names of the functional groups changed throughout the history of Federation, reflecting the changing social service needs in the greater community serviced by Federation's agencies. For clarity, the names of the functional groups listed above reflect the changes in name during the date range of the files contained within these subsubseries, indicating the range of dates contained within a specific subsubseries.

This subseries contains Agency files and General Subject files, which contain correspondence and memoranda, reports, minutes of Distribution Committee subcommittees, Functional Committee subcommittees and other committee meetings, agency budget materials and printed material issued by the agencies. The many files on the many agencies in the different subsubseries contain most of the existing files about each individual agency; it may be necessary to consult several subsubseries in order to locate all the Community Services files on one particular agency.

Historical Note:

Federation grouped agencies by the type of services offered or function. Both the Budget Department and Community Services used the functional group structure. These functional groups included Medical Care, Services to the Aged, Community Centers and YM-YWHAs, Camping Services and Jewish Education. The complete list of functional groups represented with departmental files in this subseries is listed in the Scope and Content note below.

Earlier functional groups without files in this subseries are listed in Series 2/Administration/Finance and Budget, where the date range of the files extends throughout the entire existence of Federation. For detailed information on the history and evolution of how Federation's functional groups evolved through time, refer to this document.

Two blog posts on the history of the functional groups can be found here and here.

For many decades each functional group was led by a professional referred to as a consultant. It is unclear how the term "consultant" began or why it persisted for 20 or 30 years; by the 1970s there was discussion about changing it and eventually these heads of functional groups within Community Services became directors (and, ultimately, executive directors) of their departments. Many of the consultants were hired after years of leadership positions at agencies within a specific functional field. Other consultants were more generalists who gained subject experience while at Federation. A blog post on consultants can be found here.

Explore the agencies on the Federation City interactive map, which includes dates, addresses, histories and photographs of many of Federation’s affiliated agencies through the 20th century.

Subsubseries i — Community Centers, Camping & Jewish Education, 1929—1993

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups » Community Centers, Camping & Jewish Education

195.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subsubsubseries.

Processing Information:

Please note that the 92nd Street Y is generally alphabetized in this subsubsubseries and throughout the collection under "YM-YWHA 92nd Street", although some folders may be filed as a number, appearing before "A", under "92nd".

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This subsubseries contains four subsubsubseries:

Both Graenum Berger and Joseph Harris wore numerous hats before and during their years as Directors of Community Centers, Camping, and/or Jewish Education; this is reflected in the fact that their files exist at more than one level in the hierarchical arrangement. For related files from date ranges before or after what is found here, search the entire container list worksheet.

Historical Note:

Community Centers were among the original agencies that affiliated with Federation in 1917. One of the oldest centers is the 92nd Street Y, which remains an affiliated agency of UJA-Federation. "Camping" was not originally a Functional Group, appearing originally in 1917 as "Vacation Activities" and, by 1921, as "Fresh Air Activities". The earliest Vacation Activities were more likely to have provided short summer holidays in the country north of New York City for young working girls than summer recreational camping for children. Jewish Education was, through most of the 1970s, a component of both community center and camping programs. With an increase in government funding beginning in the 1960s, Federation began funding Jewish Education programs outside of the community centers and summer camps. The arrangement of the files as well as the content of the files reflects who was managing the Jewish Education function and from which department.

Explore the agencies on the Federation City interactive map, which includes dates, addresses, histories and photographs of many of Federation’s affiliated agencies through the 20th century.

Subsubsubseries a – Directors—Graenum Berger,  1944-1975.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups » Community Centers, Camping & Jewish Education » Directors—Graenum Berger

24 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Two groups of files can be found in this subsubsubseries:

  • Consultant on Community Centers and Camping
  • Consultant on Community Centers, Ys and Associated Ys

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Graenum Berger

P-717 – Guide to the Papers of Graenum Berger, which deals with his involvement with the Ethiopian Jews and the American
    Association for Ethiopian Jews

Berger, Graenum. “Graenum, an autobiography”. Call number: E184.J5 B453 1987

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

There are several groups of Graenum Berger's files in the Community Services series:

  • - Consultant on Community Centers and Camping
  • - Consultant on Community Centers, Ys and Associated Ys – no Camping files are found here. These files include agencies classified as YM-YWHAs and as Ys grouped together as an entity known as the Associated Ys.

A third group of files, identified as Graenum Berger's camping files maintained separately from his community center files, can be found in Subsubsubseries c - Camping. And other community center files can be found elsewhere in this subsubseries.

Berger’s files reflect the Consultant’s work on the Building Fund Committee, the Functional Committee on Camping and the Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Camping. He authored a number of studies and articles, which are also present among the materials in this subsubseries. The files also reflect the Consultant on Camps’ supervision of day-to-day operations of various individual camps, including communication with camp directors and camp visits.. These materials are mostly from the late 1950s through late 1960s, with some documents from 1940s and 1970s. A portion of the Graenum Berger files represents the materials of Ramon (Ray) Berger (1929-1993), the elder son of Graenum Berger, who served as the executive director of the Association of Jewish Sponsored Camps (AJSC) from the mid- 1960s through the early 1970s, and the selected records of the Association of Jewish Sponsored Camps and its forerunner, the Jewish Vacation Association.

Many of the summer camps were directly affiliated with specific community centers, making it both difficult for the consultants and their administrators to arrange their own files, and complex in creating an understandable arrangement for these files in the archives. For example, some community centers owned and operated summer camps a bus ride from the neighborhoods where their centers were located, while other summer camps drew their campers from multiple community centers in different neighborhoods. Likewise, sometimes the consultants commingled camp and community center files and sometimes they were separate. Many of the community center and camp agency files are very closely related, and even in clearly defined groups of community center files there will be information on related camps, and vice-versa. Some of the agency histories in "This is your Federation", a handbook of the histories, services, and facilities of Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York and its member agencies" help explain the relationships between the community centers and the summer camps.

Biographical Note:

Graenum Berger was the Consultant on Community Centers and Camping for most or all of the time he worked at Federation, from the late 1940s through 1973. He was deeply involved in Federation’s activities pertaining to the planning of, fundraising for, and functioning of the community centers and camps. After Berger, two Consultants on Community Centers – Florence Schwartz and Marvin Hochberg – took over his responsibilities.

Graenum Berger (1908-1999), Jewish social worker, communal administrator and planner, was influential in expanding and improving camping services for the Jewish community. Educated at the University of Missouri and Graduate School of Jewish Social Work in New York, he was a consultant with Federation on camping and communal centers, on YM-YWHAs and on Jewish education from 1949 to 1973. Prior to this, he was executive director of the Jewish Community Center of Staten Island and director of Camp Bronx House. Berger participated in decision making not only on camps, community centers and Jewish education, but also took part in defining overall priorities, goals and policies of Federation. After his retirement he spent about a year as an expert with the Distribution Committee’s Subcommittees on Camping, Community Centers and Jewish Education. He then devoted himself to the cause of advocacy for Ethiopian Jewry, participated in various advocacy and relief programs and authored several books on the subject.

Subsubsubseries b – Directors—Joseph Harris,  bulk 1969-1990.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups » Community Centers, Camping & Jewish Education » Directors—Joseph Harris

69.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Two groups of files can be found in this subsubsubseries:

  • - Consultant on Community Centers, Ys and Associated Ys
  • - Executive Director of Group Services & Jewish Education

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Joseph Harris' files contain correspondence, memoranda, studies and reports and committee and subcommittee minutes for meetings related to community centers, camping and Jewish Education. His files as Executive Director of Group Services and Jewish Education extend from the last year prior to the merger of Federation with UJA to the first year after the merger, 1985-1987. (Both of these years were kept together with Federation and can be found in this subsubsubseries.)

Additional information on the Jewish Education work at Federation in the 1980s can be found in the blog post “Federation’s Jewish Education Department”.

Please note that most of the agency files from these last two years, 1985-1987, are budget files prepared for Distribution Committee meetings and can be found under “Distribution Committee” in the Subject Files, or under “Community Centers” or “Jewish Education”.

Biographical Note:

Joseph Harris served as Federation's Consultant on Community Centers, Ys and Associated Ys from about the 1970s to 1985. After Graenum Berger's retirement in 1973 the Community Centers and Camps Department was reorganized, and Harris took on the additional responsibility of Jewish Education. The management of Community Centers, Ys and Associated Ys was combined with Camping as "Group Services". Jewish Education became part of Group Services because many of the Jewish Education programs funded by Federation were run through the community centers and camps. In addition, funding was increased to Jewish Education programs outside of these long-time affiliated agencies, to include more orthodox Yeshivas and Day Schools. Harris was the Executive Director for Group Services and Jewish Education from 1985 to 1987.

This blog post, “Office Life in the 1980s with Joseph Harris” contains more information about Joseph Harris in the world of Jewish Community Centers. His titles and positions at Federation, some of which were overlapping, were:

1976Consultant on Community Centers and Camps; Social Planning Consultant on Jewish Education
1978Community Services Consultant
1980Consultant, Fund for Jewish Education
1982Social Planning Consultant for Community Centers and Jewish Philanthropies
1982Social Planning Consultant on Community Centers and Jewish Education
1983Associate Executive Director, Community Services
1983/4 to 1987Executive Director, Group Services and Jewish Education (approximate dates)

Subsubsubseries c – Camping,  bulk 1953-1992.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups » Community Centers, Camping & Jewish Education » Camping

49 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Four groups of files can be found in this subsubsubseries:

  • - Consultant on Camping--Graenum Berger
  • - Consultant on Camping--Asher Melzer
  • - Consultant on Camping--Herman Sainer
  • - Executive Director, Association of Jewish-Supported Camps (AJSC)--Ramon Berger

Related Material:

Individual Agencies/Jewish Vacation Association (JVA) for files from the office of JVA

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Asher Melzer

Blog post, “Eddie Cantor and Summer Camp

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Camping department files contain the files (bulk 1953-1992) of three consultants who either managed only camping agencies - Herman Sainer and Asher Melzer - or, in Graenum Berger's case, his camp files that were maintained separately from his community center files.

A portion of the Graenum Berger files represents the materials of Ramon (Ray) Berger (1929-1993), the elder son of Graenum Berger, who served as the executive director of the Association of Jewish Sponsored Camps (AJSC) from the mid- 1960s through the early 1970s, and the selected records of the Association of Jewish Sponsored Camps and its forerunner, the Jewish Vacation Association.

Certain documents and files generated during the service of Berger and Sainer were absorbed into the files of the subsequent camping consultant, Asher Melzer, and can be found with the Melzer files. The Sainer files are similar in structure to Berger’s files, reflecting various aspects of camping and information on individual camps. The materials mostly contain correspondence with the representatives of the Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Camping, individual camps and sometimes private individuals—relatives of campers. There are also memoranda, studies and reports, committee and subcommittee minutes of meetings related to camping, pamphlets and other published materials. Also included are some photographs, mid-1950s to mid-1990s, and maps and blueprints.

Three folders of personal materials, discovered after the start of the project at the UJA-Federation office, were added to the other materials during processing.

Historical Note:

Jewish organizations, including the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, gave Camping significant attention throughout the 20th century. Jewish-sponsored camping is one of the oldest camping affiliations in the U.S., beginning soon after the emergence of the first camps, those of the YMCA and Girl Scouts. The first Jewish residential camp, Surprise Lake Camp, was opened in 1901, and in 1917 it became one of the founding agencies of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. From the beginning, Federation took an active part in sponsoring and providing support for camping programs for the children of the overcrowded communities of the Lower East Side and other Jewish immigrant neighborhoods. In many instances the camps gave thousands of poor Jewish children their first experience of fresh air and contact with nature. From their earliest sponsorship of camping, Jewish communal leaders realized the importance and potential of camping for the younger generation, and also for entire families, senior adults and the handicapped.

Many agencies of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies took part in a providing Jewish children and youths with a healthy environment in the great outdoors, providing them with a nutritious diet, physical exercise, adequate rest, good company and a wide range of cultural and educational programs. Among the camps newly created in 1930s-1950s under the auspices of Federation were Camp Ramapo-Anchorage for emotionally disturbed and at-risk children, Camp Oakhurst for the handicapped, Bronx House-Emanuel Camp for senior citizens, and Camp Wildwood for family camping.

Explore the camps and other agencies on the Federation City interactive map, which includes dates, addresses, histories and photographs of many of Federation’s affiliated agencies through the 20th century.

Federation was mindful of the economic conditions of potential campers. The fees for camping services were mostly kept at a minimal level, and often the entire expense of the camp stay was absorbed by Federation, which paid particular attention to attracting children from underprivileged families37. Often a portion of the cost of camp was covered by a scholarship. With the help of Graenum Berger, Asher Melzer and Jerome Mark, and through the development of adequate Jewish programming, the Jewish camps became instrumental in strengthening Jewish identification among campers and gave an opportunity to non-Jewish youths to familiarize themselves with Jewish culture. In 1968 the Federation under the leadership of Maurice B. Hexter opened the Usdan Center for Cultural Arts (now the Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts), a summer camp and school which gave the opportunity to children with a love of the arts to develop their skills.

In addition to the individual affiliated camping agencies, other institutions have camping-related materials in the collection, including the Jewish Vacation Association (later Association of Jewish-Sponsored Camps) and the National Jewish Welfare Board. These materials reflect a comprehensive picture of the various entities that cooperated in the organized Jewish camping sphere. Federation managed budgets and programs for dozens of residential and day camps, camps for the aged, for the handicapped and mentally ill, camps for the artistically gifted and for the members of the Orthodox community. Among the persons active in the camping activities were Graenum Berger, Herman Sainer, William Rothenberg, Asher Melzer and Jerome Mark.

The materials represent not only the camps which were directly funded by Federation, but also those which were funded indirectly through the Associated YM-YWHAs - a group of Ys funded and managed by Federation throughout the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Nassau and Westchester; officially associated in 1957. Other Federation-related bodies which were involved in the camping work are the Jewish Association for College Youth (JACY) and the Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA).

The Functional Committee on Camping made decisions on issues related to the planning, operation and development of Federation’s camping services and advised the Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Camps on camping matters. The Subcommittee on Camps then allocated funding for the individual camps and camp-related projects on a yearly basis.

Asher Melzer (1922-2001) was Director of Camping services from 1976 through 1993. A refugee from Nazi Germany, Melzer was a camping enthusiast and for 21 years worked as the director of Surprise Lake Camp, an affiliated agency of Federation. He was the author of a number of articles and reports on camping, stressing the necessity of the development of camp programming based on the Jewish education of the campers. Beginning with the publication of a report by Professor Oscar Janowsky for the National Jewish Welfare Board38 , a growing number of Federation members had called for increased Jewish content in the programming for Jewish camps, community centers and Ys in order to strengthen and enhance campers’ knowledge of Jewish life. Asher Melzer, as well as Graenum Berger and members of the Functional Committee on Camping enthusiastically supported Jewish programming for Jewish camps, and a considerable amount of the consultants’ files includes materials related to this matter.

Jewish programs were developed for residential as well as day camps. It did not mean that “all Jewish camps should necessarily have a uniform ideological approach, nor should they be identified with any particular Jewish sect, but that they should be a reflection of the historical Jewish concern with helping those who are in need yet offering service to the entire community…” (from a Functional Committee Study on Camping).

As mentioned above, particular consideration was given to the establishment of a fair and comprehensive fee-setting policy for the camps. In his work, “The Philosophy and Practice of Fee Setting”, Asher Melzer wrote: “We should be interested in broadening the base of service to the larger community and get away from serving only the economically poor and deprived…. Priority of service, however, should go to the low income groups”39. Melzer was keen on developing relations with Jewish camping colleagues in Israel and he pioneered visits by counselors and instructors to Israel and programs bringing Israeli staff (counselors (shlikhim), educators, consultants) to the Federation camps.

Herman L. Sainer (1909-2002) was the successor to Berger as the Consultant on Camping, serving from 1969 through 1973. Sainer was previously the director of Cejwin Camps, the first Jewish summer cultural camp, in Port Jervis, New York.

See the blog post on Herman Sainer, “Herman Sainer Quotes Wordsworth”, and the blog post on camping, “Camping Services Materials in the UJA-Federation Collection”.

See also “Summer Camping in the United States” by Nancy Mykoff from the Jewish Women’s Archive.

Footnotes

Subsubsubseries d – Community Centers and Ys,  1971-1988.

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups » Community Centers, Camping & Jewish Education » Community Centers and Ys

24 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Four groups of files can be found in this subsubsubseries:

  • Associate Director Stephen Doochin files
  • Cultural Arts
  • Early Childhood--Jackie Glodstein files
  • Teen Services--Jackie Glodstein files

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Community Centers and Ys subsubsubseries contains files later than those in the rest of this subsubseries (under the direction of Associate Director of Community Centers and Ys Stephen Doochin).

Doochin’s files deal with the varied subjects of the Community Centers Department as a whole, and include Agency Files, Budget hearings, Communal Planning Committee files and Special Funds. There was an active committee, Community Services Committee on Community Centers (CSC-CC), with numerous subcommittees for specific concentrations such as Aging, the Arts, Early Childhood and Teen Services. The last three groups of files contain information on the work of the staff professionals representing three of these subcommittees.

The Cultural Arts files include materials on the Cultural Arts Committee and its projects, in particular an arts listing for the Jewish Week and a Directory of artists available for arts programming at Federation community centers. The Early Childhood department concentrates on issues of day care, including scholarships and funding, described in meeting minutes, a directory, questionnaires and statistics. Teen Services contains files on the Federation-funded organization B’nai B’rith Hillel/Jewish Association for College Youth (JACY), CSC-CC subcommittee and Communal Planning Committee minutes, files on specific foundations, the Summer Experience in Israel program and a teen services survey. The blog post “Cultural Arts at Federation” describes the work of the department in more detail.

Historical Note:

During the date range of these files (bulk 1979-1986) professional staff in the Community Services division developed and managed specific programs intended to enhance the programming at all of the Federation-affiliated community centers. The program areas featured in these files include Cultural Arts, Early Childhood and Teen Services.

In the late 1970s and early to mid-1980s, because many women had entered the workforce, Federation recognized a need to create pre-school classes and other early childhood programs for children whose mothers were working full or part time. In addition, there was a great need for after-school programs in safe environments that engaged teenagers; in the changing neighborhoods of New York City where drugs and crime made their neighborhood streets unsafe, local community centers provided safe havens.

Subsubseries ii — Community Development/Neighborhood Preservation, 1975—1989

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups » Community Development/Neighborhood Preservation

18 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Agencies and Support—Project Renewal—Lucille Strauss

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Langer’s Subject Files include correspondence and memoranda, reports, Distribution Committee Budget Conference files, Project Renewal/Neighborhood Preservation Steering Committee Target Neighborhood files, and the Communal Planning Committee’s subcommittee on Geographic Services Coordination minutes about communities in the Bronx, Lower Westchester, Nassau and Staten Island. Specific communities studied and aided by this program include Boro Park, Canarsie, Crown Heights and Flatbush in Brooklyn, Co-op City and Pelham Parkway in the Bronx, and Flushing and Jackson Heights-Elmhurst in Queens.

Historical Note:

After UJA and Federation began their Joint Campaign in 1974, Federation began the Neighborhood Preservation program in New York to mirror UJA’s Project Renewal program in Israel. Both programs funded specific projects in specific communities. In New York, the targeted communities suffered from declining, aging Jewish populations, a lack of jobs, increasing crime, and inadequate housing.

According to The Tradition Continues, Federation’s 1985-1986 Annual Report, President Daniel S. Shapiro wrote about Neighborhood Preservation: … “the Neighborhood Preservation Program … supports local efforts in 20 target areas, most of which are home to a number of Federation agencies … a Neighborhood Preservation Loan Fund will strengthen efforts for rehabilitating housing, home purchase down payment assistance, neighborhood marketing and promotion, and technical assistance workshops. Federation has increased its support to, and cooperative ventures with, the Jewish Community Relations Council, the Metropolitan New York Coordinating Council on Jewish Poverty, over 30 local Jewish community councils, and the Coalition to Free Soviet Jewry. Each provides critical outreach and community relations programs serving the Jewish community.”40

Joseph Langer was the director of Neighborhood Preservation from approximately 1980 to 1986/7. For more information on this program see the blog post “A Return in 1997 to the Beginning of Project Renewal”.

Footnote

Subsubseries iii — Family Welfare & Vocational/Family Children Vocational & Rehabilitation (FCVR), 1946—1985

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups » Family Welfare & Vocational/Family Children Vocational & Rehabilitation (FCVR)

20 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Agency and Subject Files, each in alphabetical order.

Related Material:

Individual Agencies/Altro Health and Rehabilitation Services

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Most of the files in this subsubseries were created by Saul Hofstein when he was the consultant for FCVR. Topics include Agency Budget Files, 1972-1983, Building Fund Program Committee files, Child Care, Commission on Synagogue Relations taskforces and subcommittees, Communal Planning Committee subcommittees, Community Council of Greater New York’s Task Force on the NYC Crisis – subcommittee on Mental Health, Community Services committees, Distribution Committee subcommittee meetings on FCVR, two boxes on Drug Dependency and Drug Programs, and Functional Committee on Family and Children’s Services.

Many folders with titles between G and Z appear to be missing.

Historical Note:

This functional group first appears in Budget Files in 1943 with one agency, the Jewish Family Welfare Society; the functional group was at that time named “Relief of Sick & Needy”. Located in Brooklyn, this society had been an agency of the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities since the 1930s. By 1945 the group “Relief of Sick & Needy” had become “Family Welfare & Vocational” and included welfare agencies for families such as Federation Employment Service (later, Federation Employment and Guidance Services, or FEGS), the Brooklyn Free Loan Association and the Jewish Social Service Association. In the 1973/1974 budget year the functional group had been renamed once more as Family, Children’s, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services (FCVR). In the 1970s and 1980s FCVR agencies included Altro Health & Rehabilitation Services (an agency that treated patients with tuberculosis and retrained them to reenter the workplace), Federation Employment and Guidance Services (FEGS) and Jewish Family Service and Community Services organizations in Long Island and Westchester.

Consultants in this Functional Group included Ruth Solomon, 1968-1971 and Saul Hofstein, DSW, about 1972 to 1981.

Subsubseries iv – Jewish Education, 1951—1984

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups » Jewish Education

13 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubsubseries:

  • Subsubsubseries i – Rabbi Hyman Chanover files - alphabetical
  • Subsubsubseries ii – Joseph Harris - Consultant on Jewish Education – alphabetical within Fund for Jewish Education, Project Grants and Proposals, and Subject Files.

Related Material:

Community Centers, Camping & Jewish Education/Directors – Joseph Harris

Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation of New York – UJF/Domestic Affairs/Community Services and Planning/Jewish Education for later Jewish Education files

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Rabbi Hyman Chanover’s files, about two boxes, contain meeting minutes, correspondence and memoranda and articles on Jewish Education. Joseph Harris’s approximately 11 boxes of files are split between Fund for Jewish Education Files and Project Grants and Proposals, consisting largely of Gruss Fund and other funding files, School and Demonstration Grants Subcommittee files and Requests for Proposals; and Subject Files dealing with Board of Education and Fund for Jewish Education issues.

Historical Note:

Throughout its history Federation leadership discussed the issue of what kind of Jewish Education to provide at its agencies, how much, and to what extent it would be funded by Federation. As early as 1917, Federation minutes mention the issue of Jewish Education. The blog post “1917 Provision for Jewish Education” goes into some detail on the illustrious committee that reported to Felix Warburg, then Chairman of Federation just prior to incorporation when he became Federation’s first President, on “the financial aspect of Jewish religious education in New York City”.

The leadership of Federation always understood the necessity of Jewish educational work as part of Federation activities, and Jewish education had a pronounced presence at the community centers, nurseries, day and supplementary schools, camps and facilities for the aged. Through the 20th century one can see how the importance and funding of Jewish Education evolved at Federation institutions.

The main agency dealing with Jewish education within Federation was the Board of Jewish Education (later the Board of Jewish Education of Greater New York), which determined the needs for Jewish education and planned and guided the programs with Jewish educational and cultural content. The Board of Jewish Education received most of the funds earmarked for Jewish education and made them available through the Distribution Committee and Program Development Fund in the form of grants for particular agencies. The main focus of Federation’s Jewish educational activities was the support of Jewish schools of all types and denominations.

Jewish Education activities included educational services and cultural programs for children, retired persons and senior citizens, as well as special education programs with Jewish content. In addition to direct aid to Jewish schools, Federation’s assistance to Jewish education took many other forms. Among these were Sabbath programs at the YM-YWHAs, Hebrew classes and Israeli cultural events at the community centers, Jewish identity development projects in cooperation with the Jewish Association for College Youth (JACY), joint programs with the Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA) and Jewish Heritage programming at Jewish residential and day camps.

Though the Board of Jewish Education was the main body providing communal planning and guidance in the field of Jewish education, it respected variance in ideologies and allowed individual agencies to determine their own priorities and needs in terms of Jewish educational and cultural programming. This policy established mutually advantageous close ties between these agencies and the Board of Jewish Education. The Program Development Fund for Jewish Education had a lay committee chaired by Solomon Litt, which generated proposals for the Board of Trustees of the Federation.

The various consultants on staff at Federation, who had responsibility for Community Centers, Camps and Jewish Education, maintained close contact with each other on issues of Jewish education and Jewish cultural programs. In the case of Joseph Harris, a substantial number of files include correspondence, memoranda and documents from the Board of Jewish Education. Dealing with day to day maintenance of the facilities where the educational work was conducted, and providing guidance for the educational programs, the Consultant was involved in such issues as building repairs and modernization, teachers’ and personnel training, updating and restructuring of curricula, providing learning material and maintaining contacts with individual agencies.

The Consultant was also a member of the Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Jewish Education, and took part in decision-making on education-related questions. Later the work of Joseph Harris as a Consultant included participation in the activities of the Fund for Jewish Education (FJE), started in 1978 with committed support from the philanthropists Joseph S. and Caroline Gruss. The Fund’s goals were to help insure the stability of Jewish schools, improve the quality of educational programs, to provide an insurance program for Jewish educators in Jewish schools, to increase the number of children receiving a Jewish education, and to encourage and support programs that reach out to unaffiliated Jewish families. Federation’s work was directed by a 22-member committee which set policy, decided on the programming and appropriated annual budget. The Fund was administered by the Board of Education from its inception.

FJE’s support of Jewish education was through the following grants to educational and communal institutions: School Grants, Demonstration Grants and Educator Benefit Grants. The School Grants included basic maintenance grants, building renovation grants, recruitment scholarships and block grants for newly developing educational needs. Demonstration grants were aimed at innovative experimental projects and approaches for achieving Jewish educational goals.

Rabbi Hyman Chanover ran the Jewish Education Department from about 1957 to 1970. Joseph Harris, in addition to his position as Consultant on Jewish Education, was also a Consultant at the Fund for Jewish Education. His years of involvement at Federation with Jewish Education were from about 1976 to 1987.

Subsubseries v — Medical Care and Services to the Aged, 1949—1987

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Functional Groups » Medical Care and Services to the Aged

32 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical. The Consultants on Medical Care and Services to the Aged files were combined into one alphabetical list. Where known, the creator of a particular file is indicated in the Notes field.

Processing Information:

During the dates these files were created, certain terminology was in standard use. Those terms that now sound inappropriate were retained for historical accuracy.

Related Material:

Individual Agencies/Central Bureau for Jewish Aged (CBJA)

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files found in this subsubseries were created by the various consultants who ran this department from 1949 to 1987, ending with files from the year following Federation's merger with UJA.

Subjects include agencies – hospitals and medical centers; geriatric institutes and old age homes; Jewish Association for Services to the Aged (JASA); outside organizations such as the Greater New York Fund, the Greater New York Hospital Association, the United Hospital Fund of New York, and the Health and Hospital Planning Council of Southern New York; Distribution Committee and Functional Committee subcommittees; Building Fund committee; and correspondence and memoranda.

Historical Note:

Consultants on Medical Care and Services to the Aged, 1949-1987; dates below are approximate:

Morris Hinenburg1952-1971
Harvey Adelsberg1972-1974
Leon Sternfeld1970-1971
Seymour Budoff1974-1976
Morton Fisher1976-1978
Sylvia Ross1978
Al Schwarz1978-1986

For more information on Al Schwarz, see his 1982 letter to the editor of the New York Times41.

Blog posts on Care of the Aged:

Footnote

Subsubseries vi — Resources and Development, 1964—1995

61 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Two groups of files can be found in this subsubseries:

  • Michele Mindlin—Coordinator of Project Learn and Russian Resettlement departments
  • Stephanie Newman—Consultant/Director of Social Planning

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Project Learn (1981-1983) and Russian Resettlement (1978 – 1981) records together comprise nine Bankers Boxes. They are arranged alphabetically by subject. Files include lecture series; bilingual pamphlets; training for lay leaders; grant documentation; chronological files; agency information; program reports; surveys that relate to these two specific programs in the Resources and Development Department.

The Project Learn (1981-1983) and Russian Resettlement (1978 – 1981) records together comprise nine Bankers Boxes. They are arranged alphabetically by subject. Files include lecture series; bilingual pamphlets; training for lay leaders; grant documentation; chronological files; agency information; program reports; surveys that relate to these two specific programs in the Resources and Development Department.

Historical Note:

In late 1974, under Executive Director of Community Services Melvin Mogulof, Rickie Radlo Lieberman joined the staff of Government Relations headed by Karl Zukerman, as Associate for Resource Development. Lieberman worked with Zukerman to establish relationships with government and outside foundations to best take advantage of the funding opportunities these sources offered.

Federation was considering how to organize staff and responsibilities to be able to access new “Non-Jewish money” from these traditionally non-Jewish funding sources. Over the next three years Lieberman successfully put together funding for many social programs including neighborhood service centers, single-parent families and Jews living in poverty, and worked to launch Federation’s resettlement program for Russian Jews immigrating to New York.

As the Resources Development Department increased the funding it brought to Federation, Lieberman began reporting directly to Donald Feldstein, by 1976 the Executive Director of Community Services. The department grew to include program development as Lieberman linked programs and agencies with funding sources.

Lieberman recruited a former colleague, Stephanie K. Newman, to replace her when Lieberman left Federation in 1977. Newman held the position for ten years, through the merger with UJA, when Lieberman was asked to return to run a larger and more complex department.

Below is a timeline of the evolution of the Resources and Development Department:

  • 1972-1975: Supported the Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Subventions and Special Funds
  • 1976-1978: Supported the Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Subventions, Memberships, and Special Projects
  • 1979-1980 and beyond: Supported the Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Special Grants
  • 1981-1982: Stephanie K. Newman is then Consultant on Special Grants; staff includes Brenda Gevertz, Michele Mindlin, Linda Levi and Susan Leicher.
  • 1982: reorganization of Special Grants Department into the Program and Resource Development Department. Newman’s memorandum to executive directors of the agencies said in part, “… [T]his office has been reorganized … to be more responsive to the needs you have to secure government and foundation support for special programs.”42

Special programs were often extra-budgetary and not part of planned annual budgets; they also often extended across agencies, so that Federation staff could plan and manage programs that were implemented in every community, or every community center, or every facility that cared for the aged. For example, the Russian Resettlement program focused at many agencies in every functional group within the neighborhoods where Russian Jews were settling. Funding from the government Urban Mass Transportation Act (UMTA) program made possible the purchase of vans and other vehicles for community centers, geriatric centers, and other Federation agencies.

Project Learn and Russian Resettlement were two related grant-funded three-year projects designed to help Russian Jewish refugees of the Soviet Union adjust to life in the United States, with particular focus upon legal and cultural issues. Michele Mindlin served as coordinator and evaluator of these Special Projects.

For more background information, please see these blog posts:

Footnote

Subseries D — Individual Agencies, 1935—1994

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Individual Agencies

13.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

This subseries is arranged in three subsubseries, alphabetically by name of agency.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The three subsubseries contained in the Individual Agencies subseries, are:

Most Federation agency files are found scattered through both the Budget Department records (Series 2/Administration/Finance and Budget) and the Community Services Division records (Series 3/Community Services), generally arranged chronologically by functional group. The files of the three agencies in this subseries have survived together because they are the files that remained as the agencies closed their doors. The logical home for them was at Federation. Particularly in the case of CBJA, because these records are the most historically complete in terms of research, they give a view of an agency across much of its history.

Subsubseries i — Altro Health and Rehabilitation Services, 1934—1990

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Individual Agencies » Altro Health and Rehabilitation Services

1.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Processing Information:

Post-1986 Altro files included with this material were retained in Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies in order to keep Altro material together. These files from after the merger with UJA show that by the time of the merger, Altro was no longer functioning and documents mostly pertain to dissolution of the corporation handled by the Legal Department at Federation.

Related Material:

Functional Groups/Family Welfare & Vocational/Family Children Vocational & Rehabilitation (FCVR)

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Subsubseries i - Altro Health and Rehabilitation Services contains about 1.5 boxes of files sent from Altro to the Legal Department of Federation during the process of closing down Altro in the 1980s. Final reorganization and dissolution material is dated as late as 1994 when final papers were signed. In addition, a limited number of historical documents can be found here, including Board of Directors minutes from 1971-1974, historical documentation from the 1940s-1950s and a few memoranda and reports from the 1970s. A limited number of case files were sent to the Legal Department when decisions were being made as to which files would be retained by Federation. Two redacted case files were retained in the archives as a sample of the kind of work Altro did, especially with tuberculosis patients, from the 1930s to the 1960s. A scrapbook put together in the 1980s provides information about Altro towards the end of its existence as a functioning agency and can be found with the oversize material.

Historical Note:

Altro Health and Rehabilitation Services began in 1913 as the Committee for the Care of Jewish Tuberculous, a medical, family care and rehabilitation agency for tuberculosis patients and their families. (See also Altro files in Subseries C. Functional Groups/Family Welfare & Vocational-Family Children Vocational & Rehabilitation.) In 1915 the Altro (“a coined abbreviation for Altruism”) Workshop was opened in the Bronx as a sheltered workshop to ease patients back into work, primarily into garment center jobs. A note from a Jeffrey Solomon file on Altro (Subgroup IV - UJA-Federation – UJF/Domestic Affairs/COO Jeffrey Solomon) for an application for funding from the Kresge Foundation states: “At the turn of the century, when tuberculosis ravaged the community, a group of concerned Jewish philanthropists formed The Committee for the Care of Jewish Tuberculous. This committee provided post-hospital treatment for persons suffering from the disease. Since most of the patients were former garment district workers, the Committee established a garment workshop in 1915 … patients, once thought of as never being able to leave a sanitarium were able to return successfully to their former positions. With medical advances in the 1940s and 1950s, tuberculosis had decreased. A new problem, though, was on the rise – the deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill. Altro began serving this growing population with psychological care and job training.”43

In 1951 the name of the parent organization changed to Altro Health and Rehabilitation Services. The organization “pioneered successfully in developing training programs first for the victims of tuberculosis and later for sufferers of cardiac ills and those recovered from mental illness.” While the administrative offices remained in midtown Manhattan, the workshops continued to operate in the Bronx. By the 1970s the workshops operated as an industrial plant with 5 businesses – garment manufacturing (uniforms), machine shop, service bureau for clerical and direct mail service, offset print shop and an electronic data processing and computer service, operating as commercial entities. The patients were “persons skilled and trained in their respective trades and occupations”. Leaders of Altro included founder and first director Edward Hochhauser and Harold M. Kase, Associate Executive Director from 1950 to 1969, and as Executive Director from 1969 to his retirement in 1978.44

Although there is some documentation that as late as 1989 UJA-Federation and “officials of Altro Health and Rehabilitation Services (Altro)” were attempting a limited reorganization to restore some services to clients, particularly to the mentally ill, and to resolve accounts payable issues in order to avoid bankruptcy, it became clear that these actions were not successful. One aspect of the plan included assistance from FEGS, leading to FEGS taking over some clients and services and staff. “In attempting to put together such a reorganization, it became evident that achieving these objectives would be impossible, absent an infusion of significant amounts of capital in a very short period of time.”45

Bibliography:

Footnotes

Subsubseries ii — Central Bureau for Jewish Aged (CBJA), 1945—1988

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Individual Agencies » Central Bureau for Jewish Aged (CBJA)

11 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These CBJA files, like the Altro files, were sent from the agency during the process of closing down. Unlike the Altro records however, which are minimal and very incomplete, the CBJA files present a relatively complete picture of this agency. Included here are what appear to be complete Board of Directors Minutes from 1945-1988 and nearly complete Executive Committee Minutes from 1945-1988; other committee meeting correspondence and minutes, publications, and files on specific agencies.

Historical Note:

The Central Bureau for the Jewish Aged (CBJA) was founded as an umbrella agency of other agencies that offered services to the elderly by the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies in 1945 and continued through the merger of the Federation with the United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York until circa 1988. In the minutes of the January 1988 Central Bureau Executive Committee meeting, a member of the committee recounted that the Central Bureau began as an extension or offshoot of Jewish Family Services (JFS) “at a time when work with the elderly was considered unimportant.” Unlike a Federation-affiliated agency that interacted directly with elderly Jewish clients and their respective families, the Central Bureau was established as a way to organize a variety of different agencies that, at least in part, offered direct service and programs to the Jewish aged. Moreover, the umbrella agency was unique in several other respects: it was a Federation subvention agency, rather than an affiliated institution, that planned, coordinated, and facilitated communication between Federation and non-Federation agencies providing care and services to the Jewish aged and, at its height, collaborated with agencies located throughout New York City and in New Jersey. In a collaborative spirit that seems ahead of its time, the by-laws of the Central Bureau committed the agency “[t]o serve as the instrumentality through which the metropolitan Jewish community may study the methods for best providing effective care for the aged…”46 where the best and most effective care for the Jewish aged in New York or New Jersey might come from a Federation-affiliated or non-affiliated agency. (from the blog post, “Central Bureau for the Jewish Aged”). See also the historical note for CBJA in the Federation map.

Footnote

Subsubseries iii — Jewish Vacation Association (JVA), 1935—1962

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Agencies and Support/Community Services » Individual Agencies » Jewish Vacation Assoication (JVA)

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The materials in the JVA subsubseries include bylaws and registration documents from 1930s, some Board and executive committee minutes, information on camp fees and samples of camp registration documentation.

Historical Note:

The Jewish Vacation Association (JVA) was a Federation-supported agency from 1928 to 1962 and played an important role in Jewish camping. It received a substantial subvention from Federation and was a separate incorporated organization. JVA operated as Federation’s main camp recruitment and referral service, and was responsible for assembling statistical data on camping. Its successor was the Association of Jewish Sponsored Camps (AJSC), which took over most of JVA’s functions. JVA was phased out gradually until it was officially closed in 1973. AJSC provided a more effective and centralized organization which planned and coordinated a wider variety of camping services for the Jewish community than JVA, reduced costs through the coordinated purchase of food and equipment, strengthened the recruitment of campers and the hiring of qualified counselors and provided an effective public relations program. At times, the Consultant on Camping also served as the Executive Director of JVA and AJSC.

Series 4 — Other Departments, 1909—2000 (bulk 1940—1986)

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments

The Series is in English.
85 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Other Departments is made up of four subseries, that break down into Federation departments and divisions whose functions do not fit into the other series.

Subseries A — Fundraising and Campaigns, 1931—1993 (bulk 1947—1986)

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Fundraising and Campaigns

10 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in six subsubseries.
Alphabetical by subject within each subsubseries.

Related Material:

Executive/Committees of the Board/Building Fund and Distribution Committee, for data on fundraising numbers and allocation details

Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/Joseph Willen, for subject files related to fundraising

Executive/Executive Office Staff/Other Staff/Edward Vajda, Director of Community Support

Administration/Finance and Budget, for data on fundraising numbers and distribution details

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This subseries contains the files that have survived from the various departments that raised money either during specific campaigns or on an ongoing basis. Although these departments and the affiliated staff were very large during most of Federation’s history, most of the records they created were deemed not of permanent value at some point. Summaries of fundraising totals and the campaigns can be found elsewhere in the collection – in the budget material, in the Board of Trustees minutes, and in annual reports. This subseries has a sampling of files from these departments: Advance Gifts, Campaigns, Legacy Development, New Leadership Division, Trades & Professions, and the Women’s Organization, which includes the Federation Thrift Shop files. These surviving files are the only permanent records and give snapshots of the most important areas of Federation’s fundraising work. Donor files are not part of the collection, as they remain active and confidential files at UJA-Federation’s offices. Also found here is a sample of the techniques used by Federation staff and lay leaders to raise the funds that supported their mission.

Historical Note:

Fundraising and Campaigns is a generic name for the departments that participated in one of Federation’s main functions - raising money to support their affiliated agencies. There were many different names over the years for these departments and divisions. During the 1970s, when many of the files here were created under the leadership of Edward Vajda, the division was known as Community Support.

In addition to annual fundraising campaigns, Federation raised money through legacies, wills, trusts and estates; by cultivating new leaders to raise funds as they became part of Federation lay leadership; through the Women’s Division, which developed their own fundraising style, for many years largely through their thrift shops; and through “Trades and Professions”, an extremely successful model for raising funds, combined with reaching other donors by community and synagogue affiliation.

Subsubseries i — Advance Gifts, 1967—1974

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Fundraising and Campaigns » Advance Gifts

.5 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Executive/Executive Office Staff/Other Staff/Edward Vajda, Director of Community Support

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These are mostly the files of Ronald Miller, Director of Advance Gifts. Later Miller was Associate Director of Community Support Department under Edward Vajda, and these files may be combined with some Community Support Department materials. Some files were originally labeled “Contributor Information Department”. It is likely that the name of the department changed frequently during this time, and Advance Gifts may at some time have been a part of what was known as Community Support.

Historical Note:

The Advance Gifts department tracked contributors and their gifts, analyzed historical giving statistics, and supported other aspects of Federation’s complex fundraising work.

Subsubseries ii — Campaigns, 1931—1966

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Fundraising and Campaigns » Campaigns

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Arranged in alphabetical order by subject. Comparative Analysis spreadsheets arranged in chronological order by campaign year.

The folders for this subsubseries are housed in separate bankers boxes. Therefore when requesting this material, be sure to check for the correct box and folder designation.

Related Material:

Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/Joseph Willen, for his subject files related to campaigns.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

All of the paper files in this subsubseries are from the office of Samuel Rosenthal, 1947-1963. They consist mainly of spreadsheets and weekly campaign reports in support of Joseph Willen’s Fundraising and Campaign needs and requirements. The department assistant was Sadye Stieglitz. There are references to Rosenthal, in his files, as “SR”.

One wire recording, of a 1957 campaign workshop was found in the collection and has been digitized. A link to the recording can also be found in the container list for this subsubseries.

Biographical Note:

Samuel Rosenthal worked at Federation from 1946 until his retirement in 1977. Rosenthal held his position in the Campaign Department and as an assistant to Executive Vice-President Joseph Willen before serving for many years (at least 1958-1977) as the Assistant Secretary of the Board of Trustees in the Executive Office.

Rosenthal was responsible, through about 1974, for the administration and management of fiscal affairs at Federation, and fiscal affairs in consultative relationship with Federation’s Joint Purchasing Corporation, Insurance Department and Pension Department. He was also involved on an administrative basis with union affairs, building operations and security, and with Federation’s Administration and Office Committees. Rosenthal was also Federation’s Controller from 1975-1977, succeeded by Jack Applebaum. In the 1974-1975 fiscal year he also worked as Controller for the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign (UFJC).

Subsubseries iii — Legacy Development, 1947—1982

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Fundraising and Campaigns » Legacy Development

1.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical and then chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Legacy cards and vouchers that comprise most of the material in this subsubseries were no doubt maintained by someone who worked for Mickey Levine or one of his successors in Legacy Development. They provide a glimpse of the work of this department which involved a lot of careful recordkeeping. The cards were packed separately from any correspondence or subject files and therefore have been divorced from context that would help explain further the work of this department.

Historical Note:

Legacies were handled for some years by Milton (Mickey) Levine; some of those years overlap with the dates of the materials in this subsubseries. The blog post “Mickey Levine’s Quandary”, discusses Mickey Levine’s role at Federation, and indicates that he was manager or director of the Legacy program when it was in Community Support from at least 1972 to 1973.

Legacy Development would have been an important aspect of fundraising at Federation as these promised gifts had the potential to be very large.

Subsubseries iv — New Leadership Division, 1964—1972

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Fundraising and Campaigns » New Leadership Division

2 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign - UFJC/Fundraising and Campaigns/Leadership Development Division, for related
    Leadership Development files circa 1974-1988 from the Joint Campaign and through the 1986 merger with UJA

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Susan Wimpfheimer, Director of New Leadership Division, approximately 1967-1972

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Materials include correspondence and memoranda and published materials on NLD fundraising events and volunteer projects, Executive Board and Annual Dinner materials.

Historical Note:

Started in about 1967, the New Leadership Division (NLD) was “the young-adult educational and fund-raising arm of Federation” (from NLD letterhead, 1970). Susan Wimpfheimer was the Director from approximately 1967 until her retirement in 1974. Some form of the leadership development continued under the auspices of the Joint Campaign in 1974 with the Leadership Development Division (LDD).

Subsubseries v — Trades & Professions, 1960—1961

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Fundraising and Campaigns » New Leadership Division

1.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by name of Trade or Professional group.

Processing Information:

Print Shop Orders would normally not be considered items of permanent value; because these files are the only record to have survived from Federation’s Trades and Professions Division (other than photographs maintained by the Public Relations Department), this content provides a glimpse at the kind of work done by this important department.

Related Material:

Public Relations/Subject Files and Photographs

Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Fundraising and Campaigns
Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Public Relations/Subject Files and Photographs
Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation of New York – UJF/Fundraising and Campaigns/Trades and Professions

Related blog posts:
Trades and Professions during the 1960-1961 Campaign
FJP Public Relations
Plate Dinners

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Trades and Professions files consist of printed material from the Federation print shop, in the form of orders for the printing of invitations and department announcements, all from the 1960-1961 fiscal campaign year. Only Trades and Professions with names I through W have survived.

Historical Note:

First mentioned in Federation minutes in 1917, the Trades and Professions Department was a large group of mostly board members and volunteers, supported by paid staff at Federation, who arranged events within the myriad trades and professions in which Federation donors and potential donors worked. By organizing donors by trade or profession, there was often intense competition among colleagues to make large enough donations every year to be influential within the donor’s workplace as well. In the Board of Trustees minutes of March 12, 1917 the Membership Committee report to the Board of Trustees states: “Organization has been effected in the Wholesale Men’s Clothing and Furnishing Trades, the Metal and Iron Trade, and the Muslin Trade. The work in the women’s groups will be organized within the next two weeks.”47

Reading the list of trades and professions shows the change in professions of the New York Jewish community. The loss of manufacturing jobs that were huge industries in New York in 1960 eventually disappeared. In later decades, fundraising activity becomes prevalent among accountants, dentists, doctors, lawyers and investment bankers.

Footnote

Subsubseries vi — Women’s Organization/Division, 1962—1993

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Fundraising and Campaigns » Women’s Organization/Division

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Blog Posts related to the Women’s Division:

Bridge and the UJA-Federation
Tubby Stayman
Women Executives at UJA-Federation” – The traditional role of women leaders in their own division, as opposed to in the organization
    as a whole, was discussed at Federation at a Board of Trustees meeting in January 1984.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Other than four folders of Women’s Division Administrative materials, the files in the Women’s Division subsubseries pertain to the Thrift Shop. These Thrift Shop files include daily reports and gross receipts, financial statements and reports, real estate matters, solicitations of items to sell in the shops, Thrift Shop committee materials and folders on the individual stores. This is the only surviving material from the Women’s Division.

Historical Note:

The Women’s Division (often referred to as the Women’s Organization) was created by Federation in 1917. The first Federation Thrift House opened in 1933; records indicate that store raised $17,000 the first year. $24,000 was raised in 1935 and $30,000 in 1940. In 1946 Thrift House moved to 39 W. 57th Street where it was located until 1982. The Thrift Shop East store opened in 1980 at Third Avenue and 81st Street, and the Federation-Flatbush Thrift was operating in Brooklyn from 1977 to 1986. Two related thrift shops exist (as of 2015) to benefit the United Jewish Council of the East Side, an affiliate of UJA-Federation. vintagethriftshop.org.

Jo Basil King was the Director of the thrift shops from at least 1974 to 1992. Milton Bluestein was an advisor to the Thrift Shop department from 1976-1978, and chairman from about 1979 to about 1982. Rose Wells (Mrs. Jerome Bing) was a long-time fashion consultant for the thrift shops. Shoppers in 1980, according to a New York Post article on October 9, included Brooke Shields, Louise Nevelson and Faye Dunaway. A Thrift Shop Committee was still in existence at UJA-Federation in 1992.

Subseries B — Government Relations, 1962—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Government Relations

22 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological by Consultant/Director of the department, and then alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Government Relations subseries provides great detail on Federation’s coordination with government programs at all levels of government. Contains correspondence and memoranda, reports and studies, government publications and subject folders covering issues of great importance to Federation such as aging, child care, health care financing, health aid training, mental health and nursing homes.

Historical Note:

There were four consultants or directors of the Government Relations department and the affiliated committee from 1967 to 1986:

  • 1967-1972 - Philip Sokol – Consultant on Government Programs/Relations and Consultant to Committee on Social Legislation
  • 1972-1979 - Karl Zukerman – Consultant to the Committee on Social Legislation, Consultant on Government Programs; Director of Supportive Services and Government Relations
  • 1979-1984 – David Liederman – Director of Government Relations
  • 1984-1986 – Rabbi David Cohen

“During the past two decades the rapid expansion of government and insurance has exerted an increasing impact upon the operations and growth of voluntary health and welfare agencies. A review of the history of Federation and its beneficiary agencies during this period clearly underscores the significance of this development which undoubtedly will accelerate in the years ahead.

“Recognizing the necessity for Federation … to concentrate its efforts and broaden its basic concern, objectives and functions … Herbert Singer in September 1960 prepared a [memo] for the President of Federation which detailed the scope of the problem and recommended that Federation ‘make a study in depth of the impact of government health and welfare programs and of insurance programs upon Federation’s institutions as well as Federation itself’.”

The Ad Hoc Committee on Government Liaison “recommended the establishment of a new department of Federation, to be known as the ’Department on Government Programs’, responsible to collect information concerning government programs in the voluntary health and welfare field, and to disseminate such information to the beneficiary agencies.” The Board of Trustees approved the establishment of this department on November 14, 1962.

Because of staffing issues the structure and mission of the department were reevaluated and taken back to committee for discussion at the Board of Trustees Committee in 1966. Department responsibilities would include: maintenance of contact with governmental program sources; dissemination of information to agencies; activity relative to the determination of reimbursement formulae; activity relative to recommendations for initiation of programs and appropriate legislation; development of guidelines to maintain appropriate safeguards for the acceptance of public funds. The Department Director would be responsible to the Committee on Government Programs.”48

Footnote

Subseries C — Public Relations, 1909—1992

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Public Relations

46 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by subsubseries, then alphabetical by folder title.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Robert I. Smith
Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Isidore Sobeloff

See also these blog posts:
FJP Public Relations
Meddler or Martyr?
We are the Dinosaur Bones
Winking Eye, Fake Moustache, and Other Novelty Items Unearthed in Federation Public Relations Series

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The bulk of the material in this subseries came from Smith’s own files or was gathered retroactively by him. The subseries contain Directors’ Files, Subject Files and Photographs documenting the early history of Federation and the work of the Public Relations department.

Also included in this subseries is a scrapbook by Isidore Sobeloff, who served as Federation’s Director of Public Affairs 1925-1929, and which showcases the work of this department in 1929.

Historical Note:

The Publicity Committee was established as one of Federation’s original committees of the Board of Trustees in the By-Laws of 1917. The Public Relations Department evolved out of this committee. Isidore Sobeloff was Director of Public Relations, 1925-1929. Robert I. Smith was Director of Publicity in 1945; Smith worked at Federation and later at the Joint Campaign until his retirement as Public Relations Director from the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign in the early 1980s. The Federation Public Relations Department provided publicity services for all of Federation’s agencies throughout the city.

Subsubseries i — Directors’ Files, 1957—1983

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Public Relations » Directors' Files

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Robert I. Smith
Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Isidore Sobeloff

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Includes directors’ correspondence and notes. A few folders from some of Smith’s successors, Norma Harrop, Mary Meyerson, and Carole Yudain are also included here.

Historical Note:

The director of Public Relations was in charge of this function for Federation and all of Federation’s affiliated agencies.

Subsubseries ii — Subject Files, 1909—1992

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Public Relations » Subject Files

32 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Subseries consists primarily of visual materials, 1917 – 1986. Includes directors’ correspondence and notes; biographical information on Federation leaders and others; agencies; annual meetings; complete run of annual reports from 1949-1986; campaigns; newspaper clippings; sample layouts of pamphlets, mailers, invitations, and letterheads; early days of Federation and the history of its establishment; “Federation City” maps; documentation of film and media projects; radio program scripts; press releases; various in-house publications; Speakers’ Bureau material, including boiler plate speeches; studies and reports; the Women’s Division. Included are files relating to 1983 tribute to William Rosenwald, a founder of UJA.

Historical Note:

As the department at Federation that created the printed materials for Federation and its agencies, and because of the interest in history of long-time director Robert I. Smith the files of the Public Relations Department became the repository for the printed documentation of Federation’s history.

Subsubseries iii — Photographs, 1912—1990

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Public Relations » Photographs

13 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubsubseries, Chronological and Subjects.

Related Material:

Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation of New York – UJF/Marketing and Communications/Photos/Legacy photographs

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The chronological subseries is grouped according to trade divisions, community divisions, and the Women’s Division. There is occasional by a few well-known photographers such as Roman Vishniac and Ike Vern.

Many of the photographs have been digitized; links are provided to the digital objects directly from the container list. Refer to Use Restrictions for information on rights.

Historical Note:

The photographs created by the Public Relations Department document the Federation-funded agencies throughout New York City and the surrounding region; special events; parties; fundraising activities, such as the annual Dial-A-Thon; camps; children; the elderly; leaders, politicians, and celebrities.

Subseries D — Religious Affairs, 1952—2000

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Other Departments » Religious Affairs

7 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Rabbi Isaac Trainin

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Topics in this subseries include Jewish poverty, the Jewish family, mixed marriages, marriage and divorce, mental health and Judaism and the role of the Jewish woman in a changing society.

Historical Note:

The Religious Affairs Department, working in conjunction throughout its history with the Commission on Synagogue Relations, was established in 1954 “in order to build a lasting bridge between Federation … and the synagogue.” The director of the Commission and the Department from about 1954 to 1986 was Rabbi Isaac (Ike) N. Trainin. The Commission held an annual assembly themed around an aspect of Jewish communal service; an annual conference; ran many ad hoc or more permanent task forces, committees and subcommittees to advise and consult with Federation and its agencies on religious problems; and issued a newsletter every other month. Task forces include those on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, Arts and Literature in Jewish Life, the Disabled, the Jewish Family, Jewish Singles and the Role of the Synagogue in the Jewish Community.

Rabbi Trainin was hired in 1952 by Joseph Willen as Federation’s liaison to the synagogue community, first as an advisor on religious affairs (“Federation’s Rabbi”) and about 1954 as Director of the Commission on Synagogue Relations49.

Footnote

Series 5: Related Organizations — Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities (BFJC), 1909—1946

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Related Organizations – Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities (BFJC)

6 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in five subseries.

  • Subseries A – Annual Reports and Minutes, alphabetical by type of file and then chronological
  • Subseries B – Files of Executive Director Irwin Rosen – alphabetical by Subject
  • Subseries C – Files of Maurice Hexter
    • – General files, alphabetical by subject
    • – Agency Files, alphabetical by agency
  • Subseries D – Finance and Budget – alphabetical by subject
  • Subseries E – Study
Processing Information:

Rosen’s notebooks for 1937-1943 have been transferred to folders. The Annual Reports, Minutes and the 1938 study on community centers have been digitized and are accessible via links from the container list.

Related Material:

For Brooklyn agency materials after 1944 see:
Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/Maurice Hexter/Subject Files
Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/Maurice Hexter/Subject and Budget Files, 1944/1945
Administration/Finance and Budget/Annual Agency Files

For General information about the merger see:
Subgroup V – Oral History Project - Maurice Hexter

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities (BFJC) files consist of five Subseries.

Subseries A - Annual Reports and Minutes, contains Annual Reports (1910-1920) and a complete set of Board of Directors minutes (1909-1944). All of this material has been digitized and is accessible via links in the container list.

Subseries B - Files of Executive Director Irwin Rosen, consists of the subject files of the last BFJC Executive Director before its merger with the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies (New York Federation), with bulk dates 1939-1944. Correspondence is mostly filed in folders A-Z by sender’s name, with more important subjects in separate folders by name. The bulk of Irwin Rosen’s files begin in 1939 when he was hired as the Executive Director of BFJC. At some point before the 1944 merger of the two federations, Irwin Rosen moved the Brooklyn office into the New York Federation office in Manhattan, which may be how and why these Brooklyn files survived. Rosen’s files include some earlier files of his predecessor directors, and he continued to add to the files for a year or so after the merger in 1944. For Brooklyn agency materials after 1944 consult the regular FJP files. After the merger Rosen became an assistant to Maurice Hexter (by then Executive Vice-President of the merged organization, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies (FJP)), and Rosen appears to have continued to oversee the servicing of the Brooklyn agencies. Rosen’s files end by the 1940s when the Brooklyn was fully integrated into FJP’s regular administration, and agencies were divided into functional groups rather than geographically.

Correspondence from 1939-1944 includes that of BFJC President Hugh Grant Straus. There is documentation that in 1941 there was already in existence a joint New York and Brooklyn Federation campaign (see: Irwin and Hexter files). Brooklyn’s difficulty in meeting the financial commitments to their agencies and achieving an equitable distribution of funds to all of the agencies in both Brooklyn and Manhattan/Bronx was improved after the 1944 merger.

Subseries C - Files of Maurice Hexter – Subject files, Agency Budget files, bulk 1938-1942. Aside from the Annual Reports and the Minutes, the earliest of the Brooklyn files are from 1938, when Maurice Hexter was hired at the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies. Hexter appears to have had involvement with or oversight of the Brooklyn agencies when he arrived at the New York Federation, and he maintained files of the agency budgets in order to help coordinate the distribution of funds among all of the agencies. Hexter’s Brooklyn files end in 1942 when he became Executive Vice-President of FSJPS and oversaw the merger in 1944.

Subseries D - Finance and Budget contains limited budgetary information about many of the Brooklyn agencies, 1928-1942. See also Maurice Hexter’s Agency files for additional budgetary information.

Subseries E – Study – A study on the Jewish Community Centers in Brooklyn by the Jewish Welfare Board, made in response to a request by Dr. Samuel Lowenstein, Executive Vice-President of the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City. This study has been digitized and is accessible via links here and in the container list.

Historical Note:

The Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities (BFJC) was formed in 1909 and merged with the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of New York City to form the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (FJP) in 1944.

The Brooklyn Federation was similar to the New York Federation (Brooklyn was older by 8 years) in that they were both formed to support local Jewish social service agencies with funding, administrative and other professional assistance. Agencies in Brooklyn at that time and for which files exist in this collection include Beth Moses Hospital, the Brooklyn Free Loan Association, The Brooklyn Hebrew Orphan Asylum, the First Hebrew Day Nursery, the Hebrew Educational Society, the Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst, and numerous neighborhood YM and YWHAs.

Executive Directors include:

1929-1930Dr. S. C. Kohs
1935-1938Dr. Joseph Schwartz
1939-1944Irwin Rosen

Series 6 — Audiovisual Materials, 1916—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Audiovisual Materials

4 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in six subseries; each subseries is a different audiovisual format.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The audiovisual materials are audio recordings in reel-to-reel form (“audio reels”) of Board of Trustee meetings and Annual Meetings, anniversary events and workshops; additional audio, captured on later cassette format, document a 60th Anniversary Institute, Board of Trustees minutes, Board of Directors meetings of the Central Bureau for the Jewish Aged, interviews in connection with a William Rosenwald event in 1983 and Women’s Division events.

There are several films in the collection, documenting agencies and fundraising events. Other formats include microfilm, 45 rpm records and a wire recording from 1957.

Many of these audiovisual materials have been digitized and are accessible with links directly from the container list.

Historical Note:

The audiovisual materials document various events and meetings at Federation in various formats.

Subseries A — Audio Reels, 1958—1981

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Audiovisual Materials » Audio Reels

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Audio Reels document Board of Trustee meetings and Annual Meetings, anniversary events and workshops, 1958-1981. They are not digitally available.

Historical Note:

The Audio Reels are audio recordings in reel-to-reel form that document meetings and events. In the 1970s Audio Cassettes began to replace the Audio Reel format.

Subseries B — Audio Cassettes, 1973—1988

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Audiovisual Materials » Audio Cassettes

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The audio recordings on cassette tape document a 60th Anniversary Institute, Board of Trustees minutes, Board of Directors meetings of the Central Bureau for the Jewish Aged, interviews in connection with a William Rosenwald event in 1983 and Women’s Division events, 1973-1988. They are not digitally available.

Historical Note:

The Audio Cassette format replaced Audio Reels in the 1970s.

Subseries C — Film, 1960—1974

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Audiovisual Materials » Film

.5 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

There are 10 films, some of which are undated and untitled. Four of the films have been digitized and are accessible through links in the container list.

Historical Note:

These 16mm films document Federation agencies and fundraising events.

Subseries D — Microfilm, 1916—1986

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Audiovisual Materials » Microfilm

.5 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Board of Trustee minutes are available in digitized form (from the microfilm), 1916-1987. The Executive Committee minutes are available in digitized form (from the microfilm), 1973-1986.

Historical Note:

The official edited versions of the Board of Trustees meetings and some of the Executive Committee meetings were bound by Federation, and the bound copies were microfilmed purely as a back-up in case of a disaster. The microfilm was digitized and these minutes are accessible through links in the container list.

Subseries E — Records—45 rpm, 1955—1973

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Audiovisual Materials » Records—45 rpm

Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

One record is labeled with the name of Camps Mikan and Recro, for prospective campers in 1973. The other record is a fundraising appeal by Danny Kaye made in 1955. The Danny Kaye recording has been digitized and is accessible in digitized form through the container list.

Historical Note:

Two 45-rpm records were made for distribution, one in 1955 and one in 1973.

Subseries F — Wire Recording, 1957

You are here: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York » Audiovisual Materials » Wire Recording

1 Wire Recording.
Arrangement:

One recording.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The New York Campaign Workshop has been digitized and is accessible via the container list.

Historical Note:

This unusual format was made in 1957 to document a campaign workshop.

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Subgroup II. United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York, 1940—1991

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York

The Subgroup is in English and Yiddish.
73 Bankers Boxes and 2 Oversize Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four series.

Acquisition Information:

David Arnow generously donated to the archives project the DVD from the original 16mm film of the 1949 UJA mission to Israel. David’s grandfather is Jack Weiler, a member of that mission.

Processing Information:

Files relating to the 1983 tribute to UJA founder William Rosenwald on his 80th birthday remain in Subgroup I - Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Public Relations/Subjects instead of in the UJA subgroup, because the files were found packed with Federation material when they arrived for processing.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies - FJP/Public Relations/Subject Files/Rosenwald, William, for files and digital links to
    1983 William Rosenwald (UJA Founder) tribute material

Subgroup V - Oral History Project:

I-93, United Service for New Americans
P-901, Ernest W. Michel Papers

Scope and Content:

The records of the United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York (UJA) form Subgroup II of the UJA-Federation of New York collection. A very small portion of the pre-merger UJA records appear to have survived, comprising only about 80 boxes within the complete UJA-Federation collection, or about 4% of the collection. It is unclear whether any additional records of UJA of Greater New York have survived elsewhere; they do not currently appear in any repository found online. The records that do survive, however, offer a snapshot of the work of UJA in New York over the approximately 45 years of its existence prior to its merger with the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies in 1986.

Included in this subgroup are four series, which will be described in detail at the series level, below.

The UJA subgroup includes a selection of minutes of the governing body of UJA, the Board of Governors; subject files of Henry C. Bernstein, Executive Vice-President (EVP) of UJA, from the 1940s through 1970 (with the bulk of these files covering the latter part of the 1960s); subject files of his successor as EVP, Ernest W. Michel; Fundraising and Campaign files of the Council of Organizations and of Henry C. Bernstein from the 1970s; and an extensive collection of UJA photographs, primarily fundraising and campaign events including UJA’s extensive network of Trades and Professions, Communities, Synagogues and Women’s Divisions, and board events and meetings, 1950s-1973. Also included is a large group of audio reels retained by the Public Relations department, 40 of which have been digitized and are accessible from the Container List.

Historical Note:

On January 10, 1939, William Rosenwald, Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver and Rabbi Jonah B. Wise formed the United Jewish Appeal (UJA) in response to Kristallnacht in Germany two months earlier, as an “organization to help Jews in need all over the world.”50 These three men represented three national organizations: the National Coordinating Committee for Aid to Refugees and Emigrants coming from Germany (NCCR, later known as the National Refugee Service), the United Palestine Appeal (UPA) and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC). The document they signed in 1939 made UJA “the fundraising organization for the work of relief and rehabilitation in Europe, for immigration and settlement in Palestine, and for refugee aid in the United States.”51 In addition to Kristallnacht, “pressure for a united appeal also came from the Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds, the organization which united all the various Jewish communal Federations and fundraising groups throughout America. Its leaders and professionals understood how much more convenient—and profitable—one annual campaign for overseas needs would be.”52

UJA’s New York office of was “closely tied to the founding of the national UJA … and its evolution [was] clearly tied to the establishment and growth of the national organization … The funds obtained in the local New York campaign, above general expenditures, were allocated to its parent body, the national UJA … The New York UJA allocated by far the major portion of its receipts to national UJA … the national UJA received approximately 30% of its funds from the New York UJA.”53

“The history of the New York UJA … can be best understood as a passionate response to crises. Less concerned with building an organization, the UJA leaders built their annual campaigns around the changing and emerging needs of Jews around the world.”

The UJA national and New York offices have continually supported the Jewish community abroad and in Israel (since its founding in 1948) through coordinated fundraising campaigns. Between 1939 and 1945, “American Jews responded to the atrocities of Kristallnacht in November, 1938 and to the Nazi invasion of Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Poland ... [By the end of 1945 UJA had become the] largest Jewish fundraising body in the United States”54, raising more than $124 million between 1939 and 1945.

In the post-war period UJA concentrated on raising money for the needs of the new State of Israel and its immigrants which was used for emergency housing and medical and social services for this quickly growing population. UJA also funded emergency air lifts of Jews from Yemen and other Middle Eastern countries to Israel. American (and New York) Jews responded with enormous financial contributions to both the Six Day War in 1967 and the Yom Kippur War of 1973.

UJA of Greater New York, like UJA’s other branch offices, adopted the fundraising goals and campaigns of UJA’s national office and contributed more than any other source to UJA projects.

The 1973 Yom Kippur War led to a major fundraising challenge because of a conflict between the timing of the UJA and Federation campaigns in New York. Because the UJA campaign was generally earlier in the year and the timing of the war coincided with the Federation campaign, the need for one merged campaign in New York became a clear priority. The UJA-Federation Joint Campaign officially launched in 1974. Subgroup III deals specifically with the files of the Joint Campaign in the years between its creation in 1974 and the complete merger of the two organizations in 1986.

During the 12 years of the Joint Campaign, both UJA and Federation remained autonomous; separate administration of their existing projects, governance and staff structures in addition to the governance and staff of the Joint Campaign itself. In order to run the campaign jointly, a formula was devised for the distribution of an appropriate percentage of the funds to each organization. This merger was just one of the mergers occurring in a number of American cities with large Jewish populations in the 1970s and 1980s as it became necessary to consolidate funding, retain relationships with donors and maintain better control over the distribution of funds. During this initial merger of the campaigns, UJA continued to fund Jewish communities overseas, particularly in Israel and Federation continued to fund local affiliated agencies and programs. Information about UJA after the 1986 merger is covered in Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation of New York.

Footnote

Restrictions:


Access Restrictions: Because of the size of the collection and of the finding aid, the actual box and folder lists are in a separate Container List, linked to this finding aid at the start of each Scope and Content Note at every level where folders exist, with this sentence:

The complete container list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

How to Use Container List: The Container List is a very large Excel spreadsheet. The first page you see when you click on the link to the Container List is a hierarchical outline for the entire collection. This outline links to each of the sheets in the spreadsheet, identified by tabs at the bottom. Please note that some subseries (or subsubseries, or subsubsubseries, etc.) are combined in one tab in the container list; the link in the outline will take you to the right sheet; you can search within the sheet to find the specific box you are looking for by using the control-F function.

To search the entire spreadsheet at one time (that is, to search every sheet), click control-F, then click on “options”, then set the “within” field to “workbook”. Because of limitations in Excel, you will need to set this to workbook every time you open the Container List and want to search the entire spreadsheet.

Once you know which boxes you would like to request, either click on the appropriate column for links to Aeon or follow directions here for requesting them through the catalog: http://www.cjh.org/p/135

Given the amount of archival materials, the collection (except for the oversize and miscellaneous boxes) is housed at an off-site storage location, within a climate and humidity controlled environment. Please be advised that you will need to request this material at least two (2) business days in advance to use any material in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room. Providing as much notice as possible before a visit would be helpful. Boxes can be requested through the box and folder listings in the Container List. For further information, please e-mail reference@ajhs.org.

Use Restrictions: Information concerning the literary rights may be obtained from the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society. Users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. For more information contact:
American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: reference@ajhs.org

Series 1: Executive, 1940-1991

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive

The Series is in English.
24 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Executive series includes files from the offices of the professional staff and volunteer lay leadership of United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York, reflected in the following subseries:

  • Subseries A. Board of Governors - primarily meeting Minutes, 1966-1986
  • Subseries B. Officers - Elaine K. Winik (President of UJA, 1982-1984), including some subject files but primarily scrapbooks and albums from missions Winik took part in or led for UJA
  • Subseries C. Executive Vice-Presidents – files of Henry C. Bernstein (bulk 1960s) and Ernest W. Michel (bulk 1970-1986)
  • Subseries D. Executive Office Staff - including various files of three Assistant Secretaries (1948-1986), Associate Director Murray Peters, 1967-approximately 1974 and Controller Ingram Bander, 1971-1973.

Digitized materials include the Board of Governors minutes.

Because of the fragmentary nature of the UJA materials in the collection, each subseries provides at best a partial record of the work of a specific department or executive, until the merger with the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies in 1986. Some files in Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign may supplement the UJA files in this series with Joint Campaign materials from about 1974 to 1986.

The only files in the collection from a UJA president are those of Elaine K. Winik.

Executive Vice-President (EVP) Henry C. Bernstein guided UJA of Greater New York through its first 30 years, 1940-1970. Because of his extended leadership, more of his files survive than any others, both in the Executive series and in Series 3 - Fundraising and Campaigns/Legacies and Special Projects. Bernstein semi-retired in about 1971 to concentrate on Legacies and Special Projects, where he worked for about ten years, 1971-1981. For all or most of the time Bernstein was EVP he was also Campaign Director, certainly through the 1960s; his EVP subject files 1968-1970, therefore, contain a mix of EVP and campaign director files.

Executive Vice-President Ernest W. Michel files include correspondence, clippings, printed materials, event announcements, conference materials, and photographs. Subjects include: conferences, travel, missions, and UJA National.

As Associate Director, Murray Peters’ general Subject Files contain mostly fundraising materials, 1967-1973, spanning both Bernstein and Michel’s tenure as Executive Vice-President. Controller Ingram Bander’s Subject Files cover the years 1971-1973 and deal with a wide range of topics. (Note: UJA used the spelling controller instead of comptroller, more often found at a not-for-profit organization.)

The files of the Assistant Secretary cover different decades and topics. Stanley Rueben inherited the files of Melville L. Rappaport and Herbert M. Parker, predecessors as Assistant Secretary whose files deal with the planning and building of the UJA building at 220 W. 58th Street in 1948-49, and subsequent work to the physical plant including the elevators in the 1950s.

Stanley Rueben’s own files relate specifically to his work with the Board of Governors and its various committees, circa 1969-1986 with the bulk in the 1970s-1980s. A few of his earlier files on union issues also survive, circa 1953-1969, when his position may have been slightly different.

Historical Note:

In the Executive Division, overall leadership came from the governing body of lay leadership, the Board of Governors, including the officers of the board. Because of the incomplete nature of the UJA records, the following historical information relates to specific subseries that are contained in the collection.

Former UJA President Elaine Winik, some of whose UJA files and scrapbooks are found in this series, became involved with UJA of Greater New York in Rye, NY when she was first married in the 1940s and held various leadership posts of increasing responsibility in UJA, including as a member of the Camping Subcommittee and Distribution Committee, Chair of Trades and Professions and Chair of the Women’s Division before becoming the first female Board President of UJA of Greater New York in 1982. She held this post until 1984 and remained active with UJA and UJA-Federation through and beyond the merger with Federation in 1986. Winik’s oral history is here.

Executive Vice-President (EVP) Henry C. Bernstein guided UJA of Greater New York through its first 30 years, 1940-1970. According to his files, Bernstein became involved with UJA in 1939, was co-director of “Jewish Appeal” from about 1940 to 1941, and Executive Director in 1942 (which may be the year the New York office split off from the national office, also located in New York City). Through at least some of his years as Executive Director/ Executive Vice-President, Bernstein was listed on letterhead as co-EVP post with Samuel Blitz. A blog post ponders Blitz’s contribution, as very little information on Blitz appears in the collection. For all or most of the time Bernstein was EVP he was also Campaign Director, certainly through the 1960s.

Bernstein was succeeded as EVP in 1971 by Ernest W. Michel, who was involved with planning for both the 1974 merger of the UJA and Federation campaigns to form the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign, and the 1986 merger with Federation to form UJA-Federation of New York. Michel was born in 1923 in Mannheim, Germany and survived the holocaust in concentration and Nazi labor camps from 1939 until 1945. He was evacuated by the Allies, covered the Nuremberg War Crimes Trial, and was sent to the United States as a displaced person with the help of UJA under the Truman Refugee Act. After working in the Midwest he relocated in 1947 to Los Angeles to work as a field representative for UJA, and in 1958 he became Director of Community Development for UJA of Greater New York. Michel held this role until 1970 when he was appointed Executive Vice-President of UJA of Greater New York. Upon the establishment of the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign in 1974, Michel held the title of Executive Vice President and Campaign Director concurrently with Stephen Solender, who also held the title of Executive Vice-President at Federation.5556

Ingram Bander joined UJA of Greater New York in 1963 as Controller, and held a number of positions in addition to Controller, including Assistant Secretary, Director of Legacy Program and Director of Personnel. He was concurrently the first Associate Executive Director of the Joint Campaign, until 1978, and retired in 1980.

Murray Peters had perhaps the longest history of any employee of UJA of Greater New York. For detailed information on his history with Federation, see his oral history and the interview he gave in preparation for a dinner in honor of William Rosenwald in 1983. Working through the years in many departments at UJA, beginning with the mailroom in 1939, he was Associate Director by 1967 with a focus on fundraising.

Footnotes

Subseries A – Board of Governors – Minutes, 1966—1986

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive » Board of Governors – Minutes

.5 Bankers Boxes
Arrangement:

Alphabetical and then chronological.

Related Material:

Executive Office Staff/Assistant Secretary/Stanley Rueben/Boards and Committees for additional Minutes and Board materials

Subgroup V – Oral Histories for Board of Governors members who were also Presidents of UJA of Greater New York:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Minutes and various board-related subject files exist for the period 1966-1986.

Historical Note:

The Board of Governors led UJA of Greater New York from about 1942 until the 1986 merger with the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies.

Subseries B – Officers – Elaine Winik, President, 1952-1991

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive » Officers – Elaine Winik, President

2 Bankers Boxes, 2 Oversize Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project - Elaine K. Winik

I-181A, National Conference on Soviet Jewry, Trip Report of Elaine K. Winik

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Date range: 1950s – 2000s. Includes many scrapbooks and photo albums documenting Winik’s involvement with UJA, most of which have been rehoused for preservation reasons. Proximity and context of scrapbook materials and photographs were maintained wherever possible. Two complete scrapbooks remain intact. Correspondence, travel notes of her frequent visits to Israel, press releases, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, framed artwork, audio tapes of Winik’s speeches, DVDs, and one VHS tape are also included.

Historical Note:

The Presidents of UJA of Greater New York:

  • Sylvan Gotshal, 1942-1947
  • Monroe Goldwater, 1948-1951
  • Louis Broido, 1952-1953
  • Monroe Goldwater, 1954-1966
  • Edward M.M. Warburg, 1967
  • Albert Parker, 1968
  • Morris L. Levinson, 1969-1971
  • Herbert Tenzer, 1972
  • Laurence A. Tisch, 1973-1974
  • William J. Levitt, 1975
  • James L. Weinberg, 1976-1978
  • Stephen Shalom, 1979-1981
  • Elaine K. Winik, 1982-1984
  • Morton A. Kornreich, 1985-198657

Former UJA President Elaine Winik was born in 1923 in Brooklyn, New York where her father was involved with Brooklyn Federation, and was chairman of the Clothing and Woolens Division of UJA of Greater New York in 1945. Winik became involved with UJA of Greater New York in Rye, NY when she was first married in the 1940s and held various leadership posts of increasing responsibility in UJA, including as a member of the Camping Subcommittee and Distribution Committee, Chair of Trades and Professions and Chair of the Women’s Division before becoming the first female Board President of UJA of Greater New York in 1982. She held this post until 1984 and remained active with UJA and UJA-Federation through and beyond the merger with Federation in 1986.

Footnote

Subseries C – Executive Vice-Presidents, 1940-1988

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive » Executive Vice-Presidents

Subsubseries i – Henry C. Bernstein, 1940—1976

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive » Executive Vice-Presidents » Henry C. Bernstein

12 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by subsubseries; Subject Files arranged chronologically and then alphabetically.

Processing Information:

Bernstein’s subject files may have been among the last worked on by Colonel Seymour J. Pomrenze. It appears that Pomrenze may have begun to combine the subject files into one overall A to Z, 1940-1980, but never finished. Some folders therefore have a long date range; most do not. Or perhaps Bernstein pulled the earlier material to take with him when he transferred to the Legacy Dept. in 1971. A few of the original folders had Pomrenze’s handwriting in felt tip pen, containing what look like stray documents.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files of Executive Vice-President (EVP) Henry C. Bernstein that survive in the Executive subseries are mainly from the last few years before he stepped down as EVP. He may have taken them with him as resource material when he became Director of Legacies and Special Projects in 1971. (Additional files from that position exist in Series 3 - Fundraising and Campaigns/Legacies and Special Projects. For all or most of the time Bernstein was EVP he was also Campaign Director, certainly through the 1960s; his EVP subject files 1968-1970, therefore, contain a mix of EVP and campaign director files.

Historical Note:

Executive Vice-President (EVP) Henry C. Bernstein guided UJA of Greater New York through its first 30 years, 1940-1970. According to his files, Bernstein became involved with UJA in 1939, was co-director of “Jewish Appeal” from about 1940 to 1941, and Executive Director in 1942 (which may be the year the New York office split off from the national office, also located in New York City). Through at least some of his years as Executive Director/ Executive Vice-President, Bernstein was listed on letterhead as co-EVP post with Samuel Blitz. A blog post ponders Blitz’s contribution, as very little information on Blitz appears in the collection. For all or most of the time Bernstein was EVP he was also Campaign Director, certainly through the 1960s. Bernstein was succeeded as EVP in 1971 by Ernest W. Michel.

Subsubseries ii – Ernest W. Michel, 1968-1988

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive » Executive Vice-Presidents » Ernest W. Michel

2 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by subsubseries.

Related Material:

P-901, Papers of Ernest W. Michel

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Bulk dates – 1970-1986. Includes correspondence, clippings, printed materials, event announcements, conference materials, and photographs. Subjects include: conferences, travel, missions, and UJA National.

Additional Michel UJA materials can be found interfiled among Michel’s UFJC files, due to Michel’s continuous tenure as an executive at both organizations.

Historical Note:

Ernest W. Michel was born in 1923 in Mannheim, Germany. He lost his parents and was separated from his sister in 1938 at the beginning of World War II. Michel managed to survive his late teenage years and early 20s in various concentration and Nazi labor camps from 1939 until 1945, when he escaped a forced march and was shortly thereafter evacuated by the Allies. At the conclusion of the war, Michel worked as reporter for the German News Agency DANA covering the Nuremberg War Crimes Trial. Following in the trial, he was able to come to the United States as a displaced person with the help of UJA under the Truman Refugee Act. He initially came to the Midwest, working as a journalist for small town newspapers. During this time, he began making occasional speeches on behalf of UJA. Through these speaking engagements, Michel was able to tell his personal story of survival to American audiences. In 1947, he began working as a field representative for UJA, relocating to Los Angeles. In this role, he would come to be known as an ardent advocate for UJA, Israel, and the Jewish people. In 1958, he accepted a promotion to become Director of Community Development for UJA of Greater New York and relocated with his family to New York City. Michel held this role until 1970 when he was appointed Executive Vice-President of UJA. Upon the establishment of the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign (UFJC) in 1974, Michel retained the title of Executive Vice-President of UJA while jointly holding the title of Campaign Director of UFJC with Sanford Solender (then the Executive Vice-President of Federation). He remained in this role essentially until his retirement in 1989 following the final merger of UJA and Federation. Michel served UJA for forty-two years and witnessed much transition in the organization, including two mergers. He was named Executive-Vice-President emeritus at UJA-Federation of New York following his retirement.

Subseries D – Executive Office Staff, 1948-1986

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff

7.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This subseries covers the years 1948-1986 with large gaps. It contains the files of executive office staff whose files survived for one reason or another, through many office moves and changes of staff.

Historical Note:

Staff included in this subseries assisted the Executive Vice-President and officers and members of the Board of Governors by putting into operation decisions that were made each year that affected campaign and fundraising procedures, budgets and specific programs.

Subsubseries i – Assistant Secretary, 1948-1986

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Assistant Secretary

5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological by name of secretary and then alphabetical by subject.

Related Material:

Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Administration

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This subsubseries contains the files of three Assistant Secretaries of UJA of Greater New York:

  • Melville Rappaport, 1948-1950
  • Herbert M. Parker, 1954-1958
  • Stanley Rueben, approximately 1980-1986

Rappaport - These files deal with the planning and building of the UJA building at 220 W. 58th Street in 1948-50, and subsequent work to the physical plant.

Parker - These files, 1954-1958, deal with the elevators at the UJA building at 220 W. 58th Street, built in 1948-1950.

Stanley Rueben’s files are mainly his work with the Board of Governors and its various committees, circa 1969-1986 (bulk 1970s-1980s). Includes lists, meeting minutes and memoranda. A few of his earlier files on union issues also survive, primarily in connection with threatened strikes in the 1950s, 1953-1969. There is also one file of pension material, 1963-1969.

Historical Note:

The three Assistant Secretaries whose files survive in some form in this subsubseries are, in chronological order:

  • Melville Rappaport
  • Herbert M. Parker
  • Stanley Rueben

The Assistant Secretary fulfilled a number of roles, which most likely evolved over time. An important function was to plan the Board of Governors meetings, and the creation and distribution of the Board minutes. From the Rappaport and Parker files it appears they also functioned as Director of Administration with an important building plant role. Their tenures as Assistant Secretary coincided with the planning and building of UJA’s own building, at 220 W. 58th Street, and they may have been responsible for the maintenance of the building itself.

For more information about the Rappaport and Parker files, refer to the blog post on the UJA of Greater New York headquarters building architect, H. I. Feldman. After about 1980 the building became a New York City High School and was demolished in 2015.

As with a number of UJA of Greater New York executives, Stanley Rueben held many titles in his tenure there. According to a 1969 “strike list” of non-union employees Rueben was at the time an Administrative Assistant. In a 1980 staff directory he is identified as Assistant Secretary, working under Henry C. Bernstein; Rueben’s files in this subseries appear to be from when he held this position. Rueben also served in Administration for the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign, and continued as Director of Administrative Services for UJA-Federation circa 1986-1989, after which he retired.

Subsubseries ii – Associate Director – Murray Peters, 1967-1975

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Associate Director - Murray Peters

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological by subsubsubseries, then alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Public Relations/Subject Files for transcript of Murray Peters interview in
    connection with William Rosenwald’s 80th birthday tribute in 1983.

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Murray Peters

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

1967-1973, with bulk dates 1970-1973. Primarily includes subject files on UJA missions, meetings, campaign issues and fundraising field staff he supervised.

Biographical Note:

Murray Peters was Associate Director under Henry C. Bernstein, probably from much earlier than his earliest files in the collection of 1967-1968, and then under Ernest W. Michel, to fiscal year 1973/1974. Peters’ counterpart at Federation was Edward R. Vajda, and Peters’ files contain correspondence between the two executives. Peters was Executive Director of Field Staff Operations at the Joint Campaign from 1973/4-1982, when he retired. His retirement was announced at a Board of Governors meeting on April 20, 1982; there was a party on June 2 for Peters and Robert (Bob) Smith (Director of Public Relations for Federation and for the Joint Campaign) at "the Automat". Peters appears in documents as early as 1953, when he was a campaign worker. He states in his oral history that he began working for UJA when it was formed in 1939, first in the mailroom (where he first met UJA founder William Rosenwald), then as an assistant field man, a field man and eventually in charge of field staff. He became Associate Director by 1967 with a focus on fundraising. He had perhaps the longest history of any employee of UJA of Greater New York.

Subsubseries iii – Controller – Ingram Bander, 1959-1974

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Executive » Executive Office Staff » Controller – Ingram Bander

2.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological, then alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The subject files cover 1967-1974 (bulk 1971-1973). From the Controller’s office, they concern retirement, union, accounting, board and general administrative issues.

Biographical Note:

Ingram Bander was a certified social worker and worked at the Jewish Welfare Federation of Detroit before joining the Jewish Board of Guardians in New York in 1962 and soon after began working at UJA of Greater New York. He was the Controller at UJA until his retirement in 1980. According to a 1969 “strike list” of non-union employees Bander was also Director of Personnel at that time, and he served as Director of Legacy Development under Henry C. Bernstein from about 1968-1980. He may also have served at some point prior to 1973 as Assistant Secretary. In addition Bander was Associate Executive Director of the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign from 1974 to 1978.

Series 2: Finance and Budget, 1947-1983 (bulk 1960-1973)

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Finance and Budget

The Series is in English.
.5 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by subject.

Processing Information:

These are the only Finance and Budget files that turned up in processing the UJA-Federation of New York collection. No other UJA of Greater New York Finance and Budget files are known to exist elsewhere.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This small series of 11 folders, 1947-1983 (bulk 1960-1973), contains material on the 1973 budget meetings, Council of Jewish Federations dues, and financial statements from 1982.

Historical Note:

The Finance and Budget department was responsible for distributing funds allocated by the UJA of Greater New York Board of Governors to the projects and programs supported by UJA, and for managing the administrative costs in running the organization.

Series 3: Fundraising and Campaigns, 1949—1985

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Fundraising and Campaigns

The Series is in Yiddish and English.
23.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

This series is arranged in two subseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Subseries A – Council of Organizations contains the records of the group of chapters, or “councils”, organized by UJA of Greater New York to raise funds within Yiddish-speaking neighborhoods for specific projects in Israel. The bulk of the files range from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s. Within Subseries A are two subsubseries: Councils, Projects, Project Photographs and Yiddish newspapers; and Yiddish radio recordings.

Subseries B – Legacies and Special Projects contains the records of Henry C. Bernstein after stepping down from the position of Executive Vice-President in 1970 through his retirement in about 1981.

Historical Note:

The heart of UJA was its annual campaign, and the fundraising conducted among hundreds of special interest divisions, based on geographic location and professions. These groups of peers encouraged friends, neighbors and colleagues to donate competitively; the groups included the Women’s Division, Communities in Queens, Long Island and Westchester, Synagogues and Congregations and Trades. The trade groups in particular are evocative of the people who were involved in UJA fundraising in that place and time: Bag and Burlap, Belts and Suspenders, Buttons, Coin Machines, Confectioners and Ladies’ Handbags are a few of the trade divisions from 1969. Another fundraising division was the Council of Organizations, groups with Yiddish-speaking and reading members.

Other fundraising techniques included the work of Henry C. Bernstein who led the Legacies and Special Projects Department, 1971-1981, working directly with major donors or their estate representatives in funding specific projects in Israel.

Subseries A – Council of Organizations, 1949-1984

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Fundraising and Campaigns » Council of Organizations

The Series is in Yiddish and English.
11 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The materials in this subseries are arranged into two subsubseries. Subsubseries i contains subject files for each of the Councils, subject files for each of the Projects, Project photographs and Yiddish newspapers. Subsubseries ii contains audio reels of recorded Yiddish radio programs, 7 of which have been digitized and are linked to the container list.

Historical Note:

The Council of Organizations, a department within the Fundraising and Campaigns division of UJA of Greater New York, organized Yiddish-speaking community-based councils (similar to Landsmanschaften) into fundraising groups. These groups raised money for specific UJA projects in Israel. Many of the projects included funding the building of new schools, medical facilities, libraries, playgrounds, community centers and other public buildings. Joseph Masliansky was the Director of the Council of Organizations in approximately the 1970s through 1982.

Subsubseries i – Councils, Projects, Project Photographs, Yiddish Newspapers, 1949-1984

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Fundraising and Campaigns » Council of Organizations » Councils, Projects, Project Photographs, Yiddish Newspapers

The Series is in Yiddish and English.
5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Councils are arranged alphabetically by name of council.
Projects are arranged numerically by project number.
Photographs are arranged numerically by the same project numbers.
Yiddish newspapers are arranged chronologically.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Councils subject files, in two bankers boxes, contain mailings, invitations and newsletters from the various councils to their members. The majority of the mailings are in English and Yiddish. Schedules for monthly meetings, invitations to banquets and fundraisers and announcements regarding weddings, funerals and bar/bat mitzvahs. Often included are RSVP cards, and brochures or other ephemera from the banquets and fundraisers. Drafts, including handwritten, of many of the newsletters are present. Also inter-office handwritten notes awaiting translation into Yiddish.

The Projects subject files include correspondence between Norman Gilmovsky of UJA and H. Avnir or Dr. Shimon Ben-Eliezer, both of the Jewish Agency for Israel. In most of the files the correspondence concerns donor plaques for completed buildings and coordinating donor visits to the projects in Israel. Many of the projects have corresponding photographs in the next section; some projects include architectural drawings, which are noted in the container list. Projects with no numbers are arranged alphabetically before the numbered projects.

The Project photographs visually document the various projects built in Israel. The photographs show the status of construction, visits of donors and installing donor plaques.

The Yiddish newspapers are one page of the Friday issues (1949-1970) of the Forward (in Yiddish) and The Day (also in Yiddish; later The Day-Jewish Journal) which was devoted to UJA campaign news. It is possible that some of the photographs, people, and UJA projects that appear on these pages can be correlated with the photographs, correspondence and other materials elsewhere in the subsubseries. During the years that the Council of Organizations was active, the scope of their activities can be seen through these weekly newspaper articles. These newspapers are extremely yellowed, brittle and fragile. Some or all may be available on microfilm at the YIVO archives.

Historical Note:

Within the Council of Organizations each community group was called a Council. The Councils raised money for specific projects in Israel, mostly the building of new buildings in towns identified by the Jewish Agency. Many of the buildings were Kindergartens, Youth Centers, Clinics and Schools. Joseph Masliansky, the Director of the Council of Organizations, communicated by mail with his counterparts in Israel about the status of these projects and gave updates and photographs to the Councils to share with their members. On most Fridays in several of the Yiddish newspapers, the Council of Organizations sponsored a full-page ad on Council events, fundraising totals and national UJA campaign news.

Subsubseries ii – Yiddish Recordings, 1964-1977

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Fundraising and Campaigns » Council of Organizations » Yiddish Recordings

The Series is in Yiddish and English.
6 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Processing Information:

Only the seven reels that have been digitized have been listened to for content, all of which are appeals for money. At the current time there is no plan to listen to the other reels or to digitize them. Contact reference@ajhs.org for information on access.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Included here are six bankers boxes of audio reels, seven of which have been digitized. Individual links can be found in the container list, or search on Council of Organizations in the full collection of digitized audio reels. Notes on the content of these seven reels can be found in the catalog record for the individual digitized reels. Only the seven reels that have been digitized have been listened to for content, all of which are appeals for money.

The Yiddish radio recordings consist of reel-to-reel tapes in sizes ranging from 5” to 11”, with the bulk of the collection on 7” reels. The major portion of this subsubseries is a 5 ½ year run of weekly UJA programs broadcast on New York City radio station WEVD from March 26, 1972 to November 7, 1977. The full date range of the show is unknown. Each program was typically less than half an hour in length. In addition, special programs include the Misha Raitzin Town Hall Concert performed on February 22, 1975 (recorded on six reels) and the Yiddish Hour (taped on nine 11” reels), recorded from March to May 1975. These programs are all located in Boxes 1-6. Box 6 also contains undated weekly broadcasts, plus programs with Zvee Scooler, a radio commentator and American actor. Also included are various undated UJA interviews with individuals, some of whom are listed as Max Garfinkel, Carl Golden and Sy Zacks.

Historical Note:

The major portion of this subsubseries is a 5 ½ year run of weekly UJA programs broadcast on New York City radio station WEVD from March 26, 1972 to November 7, 1977. The full date range of the show is unknown. Each program was typically less than half an hour in length. In addition, special programs include the Misha Raitzin Town Hall Concert performed on February 22, 1975 (recorded on six reels) and the Yiddish Hour (taped on nine 11” reels), recorded from March to May 1975.

There may be some connection between the radio broadcasts and the UJA pages in the Yiddish newspapers, which may have information about upcoming programs.

Subseries B – Legacies and Special Projects, 1963-1985

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Fundraising and Campaigns » Legacies and Special Projects

12.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Project Files arranged alphabetically.
Subject Files arranged chronologically by year and then alphabetically.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Henry C. Bernstein’s files as Director of Legacies and Special Projects, 1952-1984 (bulk 1971-1980), reflect his work during the decade after stepping down as Executive Vice-President of UJA of Greater New York. He continued, and concentrated on, soliciting major donors for national UJA/Jewish Agency projects in Israel. The two subsubseries are Project Files and Subject Files.

Project Files contain correspondence with donors, Jewish Agency staff and UJA staff and lay leaders in both the national and Greater New York offices. Most of the projects were part of either the Israel Education Fund (IEF) and the Israel Emergency Fund (EF). The Projects folders are similar to the Projects folders in the Council of Organizations subsubseries in that they all deal with the funding of public buildings in Israel.

Israel Education Fund (IEF) projects were generally specific schools (Pre-Kindergartens, Secondary schools, Comprehensive High Schools), sometimes identified with a name or town on the folder but more often with a project number. Some folders contain photographs, mostly of construction sites. Architectural plans have been transferred to oversize boxes.

Subject Files contain largely correspondence and meeting materials.

Historical Note:

Henry C. Bernstein stepped down as Executive Vice-President of UJA of Greater New York at the end of 1970 to become the Director of Legacies and Special Projects from 1971-1980. He was able to concentrate on soliciting major donors for national UJA/Jewish Agency projects in Israel, some of which also involved the Joint Distribution Committee (JDC). Funding was channeled through the United Israel Appeal (UIA), which today operates as “an independent legal entity … responsible for the allocation and oversight of funds raised by US Jewish Federation campaigns expended in Israel. The Jewish Agency is the operating agent of the United Israel Appeal on behalf of the Federation system.”58

Most of the projects were part of either the Israel Education Fund (IEF), generally specific schools (Pre-Kindergartens, Secondary schools, Comprehensive High Schools); or the Israel Emergency Fund (EF), which appear to range from helping “needy children” to a lounge at a rest home to naming a synagogue. Another fund, the Opportunity Fund (OF) is included on several folder titles.

Yetta Karel’s name appears in about 1981-1982 when Henry C. Bernstein retired; she appears to have taken over the department around 1983-1984 when all additions to the folders appear to be hers.

Footnote

Series 4: Public Relations, 1940-1986

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Public Relations

25 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

This series is arranged in three subseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The three subseries are Audiovisual Materials, Photographs and Subject files.

Historical Note:

The UJA Public Relations Department was involved in promoting UJA of New York especially during campaigns, in close conjunction with the UJA national office also located in New York City.

Subseries A – Audiovisual Materials, 1949-1986

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Public Relations » Audiovisual Materials

4 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically.

Related Material:

Fundraising and Campaigns/Council of Organizations/Yiddish Recordings for information on radio fundraising programs in Yiddish produced by or for the Council of Organizations. 7 of these reels have been digitized.

Federation of Jewish Philanthropies/Public Relations/Audio Files for interviews with Murray Peters and others talking about William Rosenwald, founder of UJA, in connection with the 1983 tribute to Rosenwald on his 80th birthday. Links to the digital files are in the Container List.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

In the Audiovisual Materials subseries there are three boxes of audio reels, 1964 – 1978; 33 of the reels have been digitized and linked to the container list. The reels not digitized are identified only by their titles and dates (or whatever information was on each reel’s box). Subjects of the reels include fundraising dinners, conferences and meetings and radio advertising spots.

There is also one film that was received in digitized format about a UJA of Greater New York mission to Israel in 1949, generously donated by David Arnow.

Subseries B – Photographs, 1940-1973

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Public Relations » Photographs

20 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically.

Related Material:

Other Photographic materials:

  • Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Public Relations/Photographs
  • Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Public Relations/Photographs
  • Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation of New York – UJF/Marketing & Communications/Photographs

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Twenty boxes of photographs, 1940-1974, approximately 17,000 mostly black & white 8 x 10” prints; some slides, negatives, color prints and prints of other sizes included as well.

The earliest boxes in this subseries cover UJA overseas activities in the 1940s and 1950s, including its work with the Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) and Keren Hayesod in Palestine/Israel. Much of the rest of the subseries is mainly fundraising activities, grouped according to community/synagogue divisions, trade divisions, and the Women’s Division. Themes include events; parties, such as annual Inaugural Dinners; fundraising activities, such as the annual Person To Person drive; local UJA chapters; UJA-Federation leaders, politicians, and celebrities.

Subseries C – Subject Files, 1941-1986

You are here: United Jewish Appeal (UJA) of Greater New York » Public Relations » Subject Files

1 Bankers Box, 2 Oversize Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies - FJP/Public Relations/Subject Files/Rosenwald for files relating to the 1983 tribute to UJA founder William Rosenwald on his 80th birthday.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Subject files: Date range 1968 – 1984. There is only one surviving box of UJA Public Relations Department Subject files; it provides a small snapshot of the work done by the department in the years leading up to the merger with Federation in 1986. Includes newsletters, Board minutes, an annual report and a William Rosenwald mission to Israel.

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Subgroup III. United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC), 1933—1989 (bulk 1974—1986)

You are here: United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC)

The Subgroup is in English.
93 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in six series.

Processing Information:

Many of the files in this subgroup were poorly packed and poorly labeled when UJA-Federation staff sent them to storage originally, making processing complicated for two reasons. First, most files documenting the work of the joint campaign were not in boxes identifying them as joint campaign files; therefore we only discovered them in boxes labeled as other subgroups. The result is that after processing this part of the collection, miscellaneous joint campaign files continued to turn up. Second, because of poor labeling and the fact that most of the files were in fragmentary series in disorganized groups, very little remained of their original order to use as a guide during processing. Therefore, we have arranged the files in most cases by the department and name of the person who originated the files, no matter how small the subseries.

Because processed boxes were sent to storage as they were completed, when additional related files turned up in later boxes, they were interfiled intellectually in the container list; physically, however, they will be found in different boxes. Researchers may need to request several boxes in order to access a group of files that are listed in intellectual order in the container list. Make sure to check box numbers carefully when requesting specific folders.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Executive Office Staff/Executive Vice—Presidents/Sanford Solender and William Kahn

Subgroup II – United Jewish Appeal — UJA/Executive/Executive Vice—Presidents/Ernest W. Michel

Subgroup IV – UJA—Federation – UJF/Executive/Executive Vice—Presidents/William Kahn and Ernest W. Michel

Subgroup V – Oral History Project, for Oral Histories of the following UJA-Federation Joint Campaign Executives:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The United Jewish Appeal — Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) form Subgroup III of the UJA—Federation of New York collection. A very small portion of the Joint Campaign records survive to document the 12 years that UJA of Greater New York and the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies held a joint campaign up to the time they merged completely, 1974 to 1986.

Included in this subgroup are six series, which will be described in detail at the series level, below.

The Joint Campaign subgroup includes minutes that appear to be nearly complete. The majority of records are in the Executive series, the files of Campaign co—Executive Vice—Presidents Ernest W. Michel and Sanford Solender, Executive Assistant Libby Peppersberg and Campaign Field Staff Director Murray Peters. Fundraising and Campaign files are not plentiful but give a snapshot of the fundraising techniques used during the Joint Campaign. The Public Relations material includes 25 boxes of photographs, mostly portraits and division events, and five boxes of subject files.

Historical Note:

Leaders from the New York offices of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies and the United Jewish Appeal first met in the 1960s to discuss the possibility of merging their fundraising campaigns. In 1974 the two organizations agreed on the merger and formed the United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) as an official organization and with a joint board. The overview of the Joint Campaign, below, gives some background on the formation of the campaign:

When the Yom Kippur War broke out on October 5, 1973, five days after Federation’s opening campaign dinner, it was speedily agreed that the Federation campaign be coordinated with a special United Jewish Appeal drive. But that decision followed a year and a half of discussions on the possibility of a merger. In the 1960's, Federation had rejected a UJA proposal to merge the campaigns. The two organizations, however, had continued to provide some services to one another …
During Heyman's [George H. Heyman, Jr., Federation president 1969—1971] administration, Federation leaders began to reconsider a joint campaign. The Yom Kippur War, then, was the final push to a process already begun. In 1974, Federation and UJA concluded a two—year arrangement for a joint campaign. While the sums allotted are subject to renegotiation, the joint campaign seems to have become a permanent arrangement. The joint campaign cannot be understood solely as an arrangement resulting from financial need. Nonmonetary considerations played a vital role in its establishment, and in the continuing desire of both sides to maintain it.
The Joint Campaign has saved the overhead costs of two separate campaigns. UJA executive vice—president Ernest W. Michel, who serves along with [Sanford] Solender as executive vice—president of the UJA—Federation Joint Campaign (a new organization established for campaign purposes and directed by a 30—member board composed of 15 representatives from each side), estimates a saving of two to three million dollars in campaign costs. But there are losses as well. A few past contributors to either UJA or Federation, for example, are so unhappy about the fact that their money will go to the other side that they refuse to contribute to the Joint Campaign. The number of gifts over $10,000 has remained constant, however, as the dropouts have been replaced by new givers. Similarly, there are a few large contributors who, because of ideological dissatisfaction, have not increased the size of their gifts, although they are in a position to do so. Others, while pleased with the merger, fail to give a new contribution equal to the sum of their two previous ones. A man who had previously given one million dollars to UJA and $80,000 to Federation found it easy to round off his gift to the former figure. Campaign contributions have dropped each year since 1974, and while no one attributes this entirely to the merger, it is difficult to argue that the merger has helped …
In addition to the financial reasons discussed, the UJA—Federation merger was a product of ideological decisions. By 1974, Federation's conception of its Jewish communal role had taken firm root. The desire for a joint campaign with UJA reflected an awareness that Israel was the primary Jewish concern of the bulk of New York's Jews. If Federation was to build a meaningful Jewish community, and play a central role in that community, it had to participate with UJA in efforts on behalf of Israel. UJA leaders agreed that there must be a united Jewish community able to express within the framework of one organization its concern for both local and overseas Jewish needs.
An additional factor leading to the Joint Campaign was each side's desire for some non—material resources of the other. Federation leaders were perceived as younger, brighter, more sophisticated, and of higher social status than those of UJA, who had, in turn, an emotional dedication in contrast to Federation's style. This passion was important in energizing campaign workers at all levels and in moving wealthy Jews to make substantial contributions …
Nevertheless, all respondents report that, in general, differences and antagonisms are receding, as Federation and UJA people increasingly work together.59

The Joint Campaign remained in effect until the more complete merger of UJA of Greater New York and the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies in 1986. More detail on the merged organization can be found in Subgroup IV: UJA—Federation of New York.

Footnote

Restrictions:


Access Restrictions: Because of the size of the collection and of the finding aid, the actual box and folder lists are in a separate Container List, linked to this finding aid at the start of each Scope and Content Note at every level where folders exist, with this sentence:

The complete container list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

How to Use Container List: The Container List is a very large Excel spreadsheet. The first page you see when you click on the link to the Container List is a hierarchical outline for the entire collection. This outline links to each of the sheets in the spreadsheet, identified by tabs at the bottom. Please note that some subseries (or subsubseries, or subsubsubseries, etc.) are combined in one tab in the container list; the link in the outline will take you to the right sheet; you can search within the sheet to find the specific box you are looking for by using the control-F function.

To search the entire spreadsheet at one time (that is, to search every sheet), click control-F, then click on “options”, then set the “within” field to “workbook”. Because of limitations in Excel, you will need to set this to workbook every time you open the Container List and want to search the entire spreadsheet.

Once you know which boxes you would like to request, either click on the appropriate column for links to Aeon or follow directions here for requesting them through the catalog: http://www.cjh.org/p/135

Given the amount of archival materials, the collection (except for the oversize and miscellaneous boxes) is housed at an off-site storage location, within a climate and humidity controlled environment. Please be advised that you will need to request this material at least two (2) business days in advance to use any material in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room. Providing as much notice as possible before a visit would be helpful. Boxes can be requested through the box and folder listings in the Container List. For further information, please e-mail reference@ajhs.org.

Use Restrictions: Information concerning the literary rights may be obtained from the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society. Users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. For more information contact:
American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: reference@ajhs.org

Series 1: Executive, 1944-1989

You are here: United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) » Executive

The Series is in English.
49.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Executive for Minutes and other Board of Trustees materials for the same date range, 1974—1986

Subgroup II – United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York — UJA/Executive for Minutes and other Board of Governors materials for the same date range, 1974—1986

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Executive series includes files from the offices of professional staff from both UJA and Federation who were involved with the Joint Campaign, bulk 1974—1986. Subseries A contains minutes of the Board of Directors (1974—1986) and one subject folder; Subseries B contains files of the co—Executive Vice—Presidents of the Joint Campaign Ernest W. Michel, Sanford Solender and William Kahn; and Joint Campaign Treasurer Harry Mancher. Other Executive Staff includes Murray Peters, Executive Director of Campaign Field Staff Operations, whose material includes correspondence and meeting materials. Other field staff files can be found in Series 4. Fundraising and Campaigns. Also included is Libby Peppersberg, who ran the Executive Office for the campaign and maintained files from the different leadership groups and their meetings where decisions were made on the day to day operations of the Campaign. These groups include the Campaign Cabinet, Campaign Executive Committee, Campaign Steering Committee and the Management Team.

Historical Note:

A committee comprised of leaders from both UJA and Federation met repeatedly over the course of two years to negotiate and finalize the agreement that formed the UJA—Federation Joint Campaign in 1974. This committee designated existing leaders of each organization to assume additional roles in the Joint Campaign. Some of the leaders for whom files exist include Ernest W. Michel, co—Executive Vice—President of the Joint Campaign and Campaign Director while retaining his title as Executive Vice—President of UJA; Sanford Solender, co—Executive Vice—President of the Joint Campaign while retaining his title as Executive Vice—President of Federation; Harry Mancher, Treasurer of the Joint Campaign and of Federation.

Subseries A – Board of Directors – Minutes, 1974-1986

You are here: United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) » Executive » Board of Directors – Minutes

.5 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Minutes and a few board—related subject files exist for the period of the Joint Campaign, 1974—1986.

Subseries B – Campaign Officers and Executive Staff Subject Files, 1944-1989

You are here: United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) » Executive » Campaign Officers and Executive Staff Subject Files

49 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by last name of creator of files.

Related Material:

For files pertaining to the Joint Campaign that were retained within the Federation or UJA executive offices, including files covering discussions held within the two organizations, separately, before the merger discussions became formalized, see also:

  • Subgroup I — Federation of Jewish Philanthropies - FJP/Executive Office Staff/Executive Vice-President/Sanford Solender
  • Subgroup I — Federation of Jewish Philanthropies - FJP/Executive Office Staff/Executive Vice-President/William Kahn
  • Subgroup II — United Jewish Appeal - UJA/Executive Vice-Presidents/Ernest W. Michel
  • Subgroup IV — UJA-Federation - UJF/Executive Office/Executive Vice-Presidents/Ernest W. Michel

See also: Subgroup V – Oral History Project, for the oral histories of people involved in the Joint Campaign, including:
Charles Ballon
Lawrence B. Buttenwieser
George H. Heyman, Jr.
William Kahn
Harry R. Mancher
Ernest W. Michel
Murray Peters
Sanford Solender
Laurence A. Tisch

P-901, Papers of Ernest W. Michel which contains predominately non-UJA-Federation materials.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Includes subject files of Joint Campaign Officers and Executive Staff, 1944, 1960—1989 (Bulk: 1974—1986). Officers and Staff with files in the collection:

Ingram Bander – Associate Executive Director, Joint Campaign, 1974—1978. Files included here: 1976—1977, 5 Bankers Boxes, arranged chronologically and then alphabetically. Bander has additional files in Subgroup II – United Jewish Appeal, which pre—date and overlap these Joint Campaign files; some files in both subgroups were received interfiled and remain that way making it important to check Bander’s folder lists in both subgroups.

Robert Gurmankin – Executive Director of Joint Field Staff, 1980—1986, about 1 Bankers Box split between 2 boxes, arranged alphabetically.

William Kahn — co—EVP of the Joint Campaign (EVP of Federation 1981—1986), 1981—1985, partial Bankers Box, arranged alphabetically.

Robert Langer – Director, Deferred Giving, Israel Emergency fund and coordinated campaigns of Federation and UJA, 1973—1976, 1 partial Bankers Box, arranged alphabetically.

Harry Mancher — Treasurer of the Joint Campaign, is the only officer represented with files in this subseries; Mancher also held the office of Treasurer of Federation at the start of the Joint Campaign. Mancher’s partial box of folders includes files from the Negotiating Committee and on the Joint Campaign Agreement, 1974—1980, arranged alphabetically.

Ernest W. Michel — co—Executive Vice—President (EVP) of the Joint Campaign (also UFJC Campaign Director and EVP of UJA), 1973—1989 (bulk 1974—1986), 18 Bankers Boxes; arranged alphabetically. Michel’s files having to do with the process of merging the two campaigns exist here. Other Michel files can be found in the UJF subgroup. Because Michel seems to have had a single executive assistant and, in many cases, one set of files for his overlapping positions, materials from either UJA or UJF can found interfiled among is papers in this subseries.

Libby Peppersberg – Executive Assistant to EVP and Campaign Director, 1976—1989 (bulk to 1986), about 4 Bankers Boxes; arranged alphabetically.

Murray Peters – Executive Director of Field Staff Operations, 1973—1985, 19 Bankers Boxes; arranged chronologically, then alphabetically.

Sanford Solender — co—Executive Vice—President (EVP) of the Joint Campaign (also EVP of Federation to 1980), 1972—1980, 5 Bankers Boxes, arranged alphabetically; additional documents were filed together with documents of his successor, William Kahn, 1974—1986, 1 Bankers Box, arranged alphabetically. The Joint Campaign files of Sanford Solender and William Kahn found in this series relate specifically to the details of the merger of the 2 campaigns; other files of these EVPs can be found in the Federation subgroup as they dealt with other aspects of running the Federation office on a day to day basis.

Historical Note:

The United Jewish Appeal – Federation Joint Campaign existed for 12 years, ending with the more complex merger of the entire operations and administration of UJA and Federation. Most of the files in the collection fall within this Executive series, as it was the Executive staff who implemented the negotiations between the two organizations to merge their annual campaigns into one joint campaign. The success of the Joint Campaign was in part responsible for the move towards the eventual merger in 1986.

The first Joint Campaign, the 1975 campaign, according to letterhead dated September 11, 1975 in the files of Ernest W. Michel in this subgroup, was led by the following officers and staff:

Ernest W. Michel – Executive Vice—President and Campaign Director
William Rosenwald – President
Laurence A. Tisch – Chairman of the Board
Lawrence B. Buttenwieser – Chairman Executive Committee
George H. Heyman, Jr. – Vice—President
Morris L. Levinson – Vice—President
Charles Ballon – Secretary
Harry R. Mancher – Treasurer
Sanford Solender – Executive Vice—President

Also among executive staff of the first campaign was Robert Forman – Executive Director of the Joint Campaign.

For Michel biographical note see Subgroup II – United Jewish Appeal.
For Kahn and Solender biographical notes see Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies.

Series 2: Administration, 1963-1986

You are here: United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) » Administration

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subseries, alphabetical by subseries name

  • Subseries A: Administrative Materials
  • Subseries B: Director of Administration Files
  • Subseries C: Finance and Budget – Treasurer’s Office
  • Subseries D: Personnel Department
Related Material:

Subgroup II – United Jewish Appeal - UJA/Executive/Executive Office Staff for additional Stanley Rueben files

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Administration series includes mostly files of the Director of Administration (also referred to as Office Manager and Director of Management in Administration), Stanley Rueben, 1963—1986 (bulk 1968—1969, 1985). Rueben may have reported to Philip Gartenberg, the Executive Director of Administration for the Joint Campaign, circa 1978—1986. Some files may include those inherited from Ingram Bander, in similar positions in UJA, and Robert P. Foreman at the Joint Campaign (UFJC).

Also included are an office directory, 1980; memoranda from the Treasurer’s office, 1976—1977; and 3 non—confidential folders from the Personnel Department regarding staff issues, 1981—1983. Any real financial information for UFJC is scattered among the files of the Executive staff.

Series 3: Agencies and Support – Project Renewal, 1970-1985

You are here: United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) » Administration

6 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by subject.

Related Material:

Executive/Campaign Officers and Executive Staff

Subgroup II – United Jewish Appeal - UJA/Fundraising and Campaigns/Legacies and Special Projects - Henry C. Bernstein for UJA/UFJC
    files on Project Renewal in Israel.

Subgroup V – Oral History Project:
Adam B. Kahan
Ilan C. Halperin

Digitized brochures:
Project Renewal: Israel/New York”, 1979
Project Renewal: Questions and Answers”, about 1980

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This series contains some of the files of Lucille Strauss (later, Rochester), longtime director of Project Renewal for UJA and the Joint Campaign. The files contain correspondence, campaign materials, mission materials and committee meeting materials.

Historical Note:

Fundraising for Project Renewal Israel/New York was considered its own sub—campaign, the “UJA—Federation Project Renewal Fund Campaign”, within the Joint Campaign, to fund both Federation’s community development projects in neighborhoods around New York and UJA’s building and program projects in neighborhoods around Israel.

According to Project Renewal marketing information, the regular, annual campaign always came first when a donor made a contribution: “Before contributing to Project Renewal a contributor must first make a gift to the Regular Campaign”.

The Israel portion of Project Renewal during this time was for projects in Hatikvah, a neighborhood in Tel Aviv. According to Jerusalem Post articles from 2012 this is still a poor and troubled neighborhood of south Tel Aviv. The New York portion dealt with projects around greater metropolitan New York, including the Bronx (Co—op City), Brooklyn (Canarsie, Bensonhurst, Crown Heights), Manhattan (Washington Heights) and Queens.

Lucille Strauss (later Rochester) was involved with Project Renewal at UJA through the 1970s. She was Director of Project Renewal for UFJC perhaps from the beginning of the Joint Campaign; her files date from 1978—1983. In 1983, Fran Ginsburg became the Director; the Associate Director was Sara Bernstein. The Liaison in Israel was Miriam H. Brown.

Series 4: Fundraising and Campaigns, 1970-1989

You are here: United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) »Fundraising and Campaigns

6 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by Subseries.

Processing Information:

The files in this series arrived from storage labeled inaccurately and packed in boxes of unrelated files, which may be why they survived earlier file purges. Although not specifically selected for archival value, these files serve a purpose within the collection as a snapshot of how parts of the Joint Campaign were run “on the ground”.

Because of the inconsistent and inaccurate box descriptions on most of the Joint Campaign collection (for example they were sometimes labeled as UJA—Federation because they were put into storage after the merger in 1986 although the contents of the boxes were all prior to the merger), not all of the Fundraising and Campaigns files were brought in for processing at the same time. They continued to show up over the course of months and years, a few folders at a time.

Because of time and space limitations of this project – archivists worked with only a few hundred boxes at one time. Processed boxes were sent to storage before bringing in a new group of boxes. Additional folders identified as belonging to this series were added intellectually after the first files had been sent to storage. Boxes were not repacked physically in the same intellectual order you can see in the container list. So when requesting boxes from this series, please note the correct box numbers for folders you would like to see.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Very small groups of files were retained from the Fundraising and Campaigns departments of the Joint Campaign. Refer to the processing note below for information on the lack of original order and an explanation of why the files are packed the way they are.

Files from the different departments involved with fundraising and the work of running a campaign have been arranged by department as subseries. The subseries are:

  • Bronx (one of the “Communities” used by the campaign to fundraise locally)
  • Lawyers Division
  • Leadership Development
  • Manhattan (another “Community”)
  • Miscellaneous
  • Queens and Long Island (another “Community”)
  • Sephardic Campaign
  • Trades and Professions – includes Cars and Trucks, Corrugated Boxes, Meat and Poultry, Supermarkets and Grocers and Wall Street Investment Banking. These files are a sample of the type of work the Trades and Professions divisions performed, showing the detail in soliciting donations from potential donors grouped by profession. In earlier years at both Federation and UJA this division was more heavily grouped into trades – salesmen and manufacturers within New York City. The files begin to show the evolution of the Jewish population as the next generation not only went to college but graduate school as well, and the donor base became more professional. Thus the existence of Supermarkets and Grocers trade group alongside Wall Street Investment Banking professionals.

    An example of the contents of this material is the Wall Street Investment Banking subseries attributed to Stuart Wershub, the Division Secretary, 1974—1975; includes some subject files from both Federation and UJA pre—merger. Noted in the files is the fact that some donors who wanted their checks to go just to UJA projects and not to Federation, were able to earmark their donations for the Israel Emergency Fund, which would have been sent entirely overseas.

The subseries with the most files are Leadership Development, with about 3.5 Bankers Boxes; and Trades and Professions with about 2.5 Bankers Boxes.

Many of the files in this series survived by chance, not because they were selected for their permanent archival value. In the absence of any other record of how campaigns and fundraising was performed during the years of the Joint Campaign, these files serve as a snapshot of the depth of fundraising specialization and reach, no doubt pulling the best techniques from both Federation and UJA as they figured out how to successfully fund both local and overseas programs and projects in one campaign.

Historical Note:

The heart of the Joint Campaign, of course, was its annual campaign, and the fundraising conducted among hundreds of trade and professional groups, within communities and local synagogues. The merging of the UJA and Federation campaigns in 1974—1975 solved some problems and created others; some of this is discussed in more detail in the longer historical note for the Joint Campaign subgroup. The goal was to eliminate the need to approach donors more than once a year once the two campaigns were no longer in competition with each other (unless an emergency in Israel made an emergency campaign a necessity).

It had become clear at the outbreak of the Yom Kippur War in 1973 that UJA could no longer promise to start their campaign 6 months after the Federation campaign.

The Leadership Development Division (LDD) was the continuation of the New Leadership Division at Federation from 1967 through the beginning of the Joint Campaign. The director of LDD in 1981 was Beth Rubin. Staff included Nan Berman, Paula Eisenstadt, Nancee Haft, Sherry Spector and Stanley Stone. In approximately the mid-1980s, towards the end of the Joint Campaign, LDD created a 2-year program, L.E.A.D. – Leadership, Education and Development, to train, education and develop leaders for the Division and UJA-Federation.

Series 5: Public Relations, 1933-1986

You are here: United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) »Public Relations

29.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

The series is arranged in two subseries.

  • Subseries A: Photographs
    • Subsubseries i: Portraits — arranged alphabetically by last name, 7 boxes
    • Subsubseries ii: Divisions — arranged chronologically, then alphabetically, 15.5 boxes
    • Subsubseries iii: Subjects — arranged alphabetically, 1 box
    • Subsubseries iv: Slides — arranged chronologically, 1.5 boxes
  • Subseries B: Subject Files – arranged alphabetically, 5 boxes
Related Material:

Other Public Relations materials:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Photographs:
Date range 1933 – 1986. Approximately 25,000 mostly black & white 8 x 10” prints; negatives, color prints, and prints of other sizes included as well. More than one box of the subseries is comprised of color slides.

The Portrait subsubseries includes names of the subjects listed individually in the notes field of the Container list for most folders, wherever they were supplied, and are searchable.

The Divisions subsubseries is comprised of Trades and Communities events, from 1974—1985.

Subject Files: Contain primarily files of Events, Newspaper Clippings and Scripts, 1974—1986.

Historical Note:

The Joint Campaign Public Relations Department was involved in promoting campaigns and the organization. Subject files include advertising, events, radio and television scripts, and newspaper clippings mentioning Federation, UJA and the Joint Campaign.

In the Photograph subseries, the Portraits subsubseries documents Federation, UJA, and Joint Campaign leaders and donors, as well as politicians and celebrities. Themes found in the Divisions and Subjects subseries include events; parties, such as the annual Inaugural Dinners; fundraising activities; local chapters; and Israel. The photographs were used in newsletters and to publicize Joint Campaign events.

Series 6: Audiovisual Materials, 1974-1977

You are here: United Jewish Appeal – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Joint Campaign (UFJC) » Audiovisual Materials

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

The series is arranged in two subseries.

  • Subseries A. Films
  • Subseries B. Video
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Subgroup IV. UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF), 1890s—2013 (bulk 1986—2000)

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF)

633 Bankers Boxes and 6 Oversize Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in nine series.

Related Material:

Refer to this AJHS Related Collections list, many of which are related to the UJA-Federation of New York material, its historical antecedents and its affiliated agencies, for additional information.

Also, see Michael J. Austin, Editor, Guiding Organizational Change: The New York UJA-Federation (1986-1996) (New York: United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York, Inc., 1996), 3-4. AJHS call number HV3192.N5 G851 1996. Many of the notes in this subgroup utilize information from throughout this publication, which exists in hard copy in various folders throughout subgroup IV.

Scope and Content:

The bulk dates for this subgroup are 1986, the date of the merger, through 2000. Later files, although they exist in scattered files throughout the subgroup, are in active use at UJA-Federation.

The merged UJA-Federation of New York organization evolved gradually into one integrated whole. Researchers familiar with the Federation or the UJA structure will be able to see the evolution in the names of the departments and divisions and in the ways departments are grouped. Some of the historical notes and scope and content notes elsewhere in the hierarchy for this subgroup indicate changes within a department, particularly when the department originated with Federation and earlier files exist in Subgroup I.

Historical Note:

UJA-Federation of New York was formed in 1986 by the merger of United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York with the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York. Federation was formed in 1917 as a federation of local New York social service agencies, with an annual Federation-led fundraising campaign to provide for all of Federation’s affiliated societies. United Jewish Appeal was formed in 1939 in response to Kristallnacht in Germany two months earlier, as an “organization to help Jews in need all over the world”60. (For more information on the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York refer to Subgroup I. For more information on the history of UJA refer to Subgroup II.)

Originally two very separate organizations,

“[i]t was increasingly clear that two separate campaigns—for local Federation needs and overseas UJA needs—was neither an efficient nor effective approach to federated fundraising. By the early 1970s it also became apparent that the Federation was losing market share to other charities, Jewish and non-Jewish, and therefore needed an overseas component to attract donors. However, it would take a major external force to successfully grab the attention of lay leaders.
“Following the Yom Kippur War of 1973, in response to the international call for assistance, major efforts were made to merge the campaigns. Over the next decade [under a merged campaign] the annual campaigns continued to grow, but it became apparent that the two organizations would benefit from a total merger, not just [of the] campaign. As a result of a three-year study by lay leaders representing both organizations, the UJA and the Federation were officially merged into the new UJA-Federation in 1986.”61
Gradually over the next decade UJA-Federation of New York evolved into one wholly integrated organization. A mission statement was adopted in 1989, and the first strategic plan was adopted in 1993 to “equip [UJA-Federation of New York] to fulfill [their] mission”. Changes included strengthening the services they supported, collaboration with a wider range of institutions, assuring the continuity of their Jewish community, broadening UJA-Federation’s base of support and generating substantially more funds.62

Footnotes

Restrictions:


Access Restrictions: Because of the size of the collection and of the finding aid, the actual box and folder lists are in a separate Container List, linked to this finding aid at the start of each Scope and Content Note at every level where folders exist, with this sentence:

The complete container list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

How to Use Container List: The Container List is a very large Excel spreadsheet. The first page you see when you click on the link to the Container List is a hierarchical outline for the entire collection. This outline links to each of the sheets in the spreadsheet, identified by tabs at the bottom. Please note that some subseries (or subsubseries, or subsubsubseries, etc.) are combined in one tab in the container list; the link in the outline will take you to the right sheet; you can search within the sheet to find the specific box you are looking for by using the control-F function.

To search the entire spreadsheet at one time (that is, to search every sheet), click control-F, then click on “options”, then set the “within” field to “workbook”. Because of limitations in Excel, you will need to set this to workbook every time you open the Container List and want to search the entire spreadsheet.

Once you know which boxes you would like to request, either click on the appropriate column for links to Aeon or follow directions here for requesting them through the catalog: http://www.cjh.org/p/135

Given the amount of archival materials, the collection (except for the oversize and miscellaneous boxes) is housed at an off-site storage location, within a climate and humidity controlled environment. Please be advised that you will need to request this material at least two (2) business days in advance to use any material in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room. Providing as much notice as possible before a visit would be helpful. Boxes can be requested through the box and folder listings in the Container List. For further information, please e-mail reference@ajhs.org.

Use Restrictions: Information concerning the literary rights may be obtained from the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society. Users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. For more information contact:
American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: reference@ajhs.org

Series 1: Executive, 1944—2007

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive

The Series is in English.
238.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – for Oral Histories of the following UJA-Federation Presidents:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The four subseries in Series 1 are:

Other than meeting minutes and other board committee files, only the files of the executive staff of UJA-Federation exist in this Series. Within the Executive Office files are those of the Executive Vice-Presidents, including the merger files of Federation’s William Kahn although he left the organization at the time of the merger. Other Executive staff files include those of the Chief Operating Officer, the Senior Management Team and the Financial Resource Development Department, and the Directors of the Executive Office itself.

Historical Note:

UJA-Federation of New York was governed by a Board of Directors, with an Executive Committee and other committees of the board providing leadership for every department of the organization. A very strong professional executive staff worked at UJA-Federation after the merger, many of whom came from either the Executive office of Federation or UJA. New leadership joined in the years after the merger to lead the organization in its new form at the beginning of the 21st century.

Subseries A. Board of Directors Minutes, 1986—2000

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Board of Directors Minutes

2 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Board of Directors minutes subseries is comprised of the meeting minutes of Board of Directors meetings, many combined meetings of the Domestic Affairs Council and the Overseas Assembly. Many of the minutes through 1992 have been digitized and are accessible via links at the folder level from the container list. There is one bound volume, for the year 1994; all other minutes are stapled or clipped copies in folders.

Historical Note:

The Board of Directors minutes reflect the work of the Board – making policy and managing the affairs of UJA-Federation. The board is also responsible for the “assets” of the Domestic and Overseas Affairs divisions. Recommendations from these councils are made to the Board and are contained in the minutes, identified in many sets of minutes as “Combined Meeting”. These two bodies focused on the local and overseas work that had previously been done by Federation and UJA, respectively.

Subseries B. Executive Committee Minutes, 1986—2000

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Committee Minutes

2 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The minutes may also include agendas and memoranda.

Historical Note:

The Executive Committee is responsible for managing the organization’s affairs. In the first ten years of UJA-Federation’s existence these responsibilities may have been taken over by the Management Committee, for which some files exist elsewhere in the collection with the files of the a participant who retained the minutes from the years of his participation.

Subseries C. Committees of the Board, 1986—1999

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Committees of the Board

5.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

After the Communal Planning Committee and Distribution Committee, these are alphabetical by name of committee or group.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Comprised mostly of files of the Communal Planning Committee and the Distribution Committee, other committees are represented in fragmentary form. Additional files from many of the Board committees can be found with the files of various departments whose representatives attended particular Board committee meetings.

Historical Note:

Committees of the Board were determined initially by the by-laws of UJA-Federation in 1986.

Subsubseries i – Communal Planning Committee, 1987—1993

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Committees of the Board » Communal Planning Committee

1.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by subject; Correspondence is chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

One box of CPC files are from the office of Larry Kobrin from his years as a member and as chairman of the CPC. These files end in 1993. Other files are subject files from the committee.

Historical Note:

The Communal Planning Committee (CPC) was a continuation of the Communal Planning Committee that existed at Federation. As of a reorganization in 1994, the responsibilities of the CPC were taken over by other committees and departments.

Subsubseries ii – Distribution Committee, 1986—1995

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Committees of the Board » Distribution Committee

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files of the Distribution Committee include some Minutes, Proposed Budgets and Reports through 1995, Recommendations of Subcommittees, Restricted Grants and Special Funds.

Historical Note:

The Distribution Committee was a continuation of the committee that existed at Federation. As of a reorganization in 1994, the responsibilities of the distribution committee were taken over by the Appropriations Committee. Additional files from the Appropriations Committee may be found with the files of various departments whose representatives attended those meetings.

Subsubseries iii – Other Committees and Groups, 1986—1999

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Committees of the Board » Other Committees and Groups

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by name of committee or group.

Related Material:

Executive Office/Other Executive Staff/Senior Management Team - Lyn Light Geller

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Other Committees and Groups includes minutes, correspondence, budget materials and reports for various committees, teams and cabinets. Committees represented include the Management Committee, 1991-1994; Planning and Allocations Committee, 1994-1999; Populations Study Committee for the 1986 and 1991 Population Surveys; and Senior Management Team, 1993-1996.

Historical Note:

Other Committees of the Board are committees (also “teams” and “cabinets”) authorized by the Board of Directors either on a permanent or ad hoc basis. These committees were tasked with specific responsibilities; their reports to the Board would result in board votes and decisions.

Subseries D. Executive Office, 1944—2007

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office

229 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The two subsubseries within Executive Office are:

Historical Note:

The Executive Office held the offices of the Professional Executive Staff, in particular the Executive Vice-President, their support staff and the support staff for the Officers, Board of Directors and Committees of the Board.

Subsubseries i – Executive Vice-Presidents, 1944—2007

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Executive Vice-Presidents

169 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological by term of office, then alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents, for earlier work of the Federation Executive Vice-Presidents

Subgroup II – United Jewish Appeal – UJA/Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents, for earlier work of the UJA Executive Vice-Presidents

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files of the Executive Vice-Presidents contain the broadest range of subjects within the UJA-Federation subgroup. Every issue with which UJA-Federation was involved during any particular range of dates can be found within the correspondence, reports and subject files here.

The subsubseries begins with the merger files of William Kahn, the Executive Vice-President of Federation until the merger. It was Kahn who was most involved with many aspects of the merger in the mid-1980s and this work is reflected in his files included here.

Historical Note:

When UJA of Greater New York merged with the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York on July 1, 1986, Stephen D. Solender (SDS) and Ernest W. Michel, from Federation and UJA respectively, shared the title of Executive Vice-President (EVP), the top staff position. The decision was made through the merger plan to protect the interests of both UJA and Federation by leaving in place the two EVPs.

William Kahn was the EVP of Federation from 1981 to 1986. He led Federation through the merger together with members of the Board of Trustees, and left as the merger took place when Stephen D. Solender was hired to replace him. His merger files are included here.

Michel and SDS co-managed the newly merged organization with the support of their combined senior staffs. When Michel retired in 1989, SDS became the sole EVP and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of UJA-Federation. SDS continued to serve as EVP until 1999.

Dr. John S. Ruskay succeeded SDS as EVP and CEO, from 1999 to 2014. During his tenure, Ruskay advocated for the critical role of Jewish philanthropy as central to the effectiveness of the community. Eric Goldstein succeeded Ruskay as CEO in July of 2014.

1986-1989Stephen D. Solender and Ernest W. Michel
1989-1999Stephen D. Solender
1999-June 2014John S. Ruskay (also CEO)
July 2014-Eric Goldstein

Subsubsubseries a – William Kahn – Merger Files,  1944, 1972-1986.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Executive Vice-Presidents » William Kahn – Merger Files

2 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Executive/Executive Office Staff/Executive Vice-Presidents/William Kahn

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – William Kahn

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

William Kahn’s Merger Files include governance documentation such as By-Laws and Certificates of Incorporation for Federation, UJA and the Joint Campaign, used while planning the details of governance for the merged organization. Included here in depth are files from the committee created to explore the possibility of a merger, named the Committee to Explore the Future Relationship of UJA and Federation (CEFRUF). There are chronological files from 1978 through 1985. The final Compilation of Primary Documents are here and there are links to these files directly from the container list. Other files of interest are Subcommittee files and a “Merger Fact Sheet”.

Historical Note:

William Kahn succeeded Sanford Solender as Executive Vice President (EVP) of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York in 1981, and led Federation through the process of merging with United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York. He left Federation in 1986 to become the EVP of the Federation in St. Louis as the merger in New York took effect. William Kahn died in 2013 at 87. Additional biographical information can be found here.

Subsubsubseries b – Ernest W. Michel,  1969-1988.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Executive Vice-Presidents » Ernest W. Michel

.5 Bankers Box
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup II – United Jewish Appeal - UJA/Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/Ernest W. Michel

Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign - UFJC/Executive/Campaign Officers and Executive Staff Subject Files/Ernest W. Michel,
    EVP and Campaign Director

Subgroup V - Oral History Project – Ernest W. Michel

P-901, Papers of Ernest W. Michel

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Ernest W. Michel Files consist entirely of Correspondence, all but one file with correspondents in Israel. The folders are labeled with the name of the correspondent or, in a few cases, by subject. Some files include correspondence about the correspondent in addition to correspondence from or to them. Correspondents include Teddy Kollek, Golda Meir, Ariel Sharon and Natan Shcharansky.

Historical Note:

Ernest W. Michel was born in 1923 in Mannheim, Germany. He lost his parents and was separated from his sister in 1938 at the beginning of World War II. Michel managed to survive his late teenage years and early 20s in various concentration and Nazi labor camps from 1939 until 1945, when he escaped a forced march and was shortly thereafter evacuated by the Allies. At the conclusion of the war, Michel worked as a reporter for the German News Agency DANA covering the Nuremberg War Crimes Trial. Following the trial, he was able to come to the United States as a displaced person with the help of UJA under the Truman Refugee Act. He initially came to the Midwest, working as a journalist for small town newspapers. During this time, he began making occasional speeches on behalf of UJA. Through these speaking engagements, Michel was able to tell his personal story of survival to American audiences. In 1947, he began working as a field representative for UJA, relocating to Los Angeles. In this role, he would come to be known as an ardent advocate for UJA, Israel, and the Jewish people. In 1958, he accepted a promotion to become Director of Community Development for UJA of Greater New York and relocated with his family to New York City. Michel held this role until 1970 when he was appointed Executive Vice-President of UJA. Upon the establishment of the UJA-Federation Joint Campaign (UFJC) in 1974, Michel retained the title of Executive Vice-President of UJA while jointly holding the title of Campaign Director of UFJC with Sanford Solender (then the Executive Vice-President of Federation). He remained in this role until the 1986 merger with Federation when he became a co-Executive Vice-President with Stephen D. Solender (Sanford Solender’s son) of the merged UJA-Federation of New York until his retirement in 1989. Michel served UJA for forty-two years and witnessed much transition in the organization, including two mergers. He was named Executive-Vice-President emeritus at UJA-Federation of New York following his retirement.

Subsubsubseries c – Stephen D. Solender,  1966-1999 (bulk 1986-1999).

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Executive Vice-Presidents » Stephen D. Solender

154.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical, in three groups:

Chronological Files - chronological
General Correspondence – chronological and then alphabetical
Subject Files - alphabetical

Processing Information:

Because of the way the processing was conducted, folders have been arranged in the container list in intellectual order, but they may be located physically in different boxes. Please use care when requesting boxes as some folders may in fact be located elsewhere.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Stephen D. Solender

P-554, Solender Family Papers

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Stephen Solender's subject files range over the many issues that he dealt with as Executive Vice-President (EVP), 1986-1999, including the Capital Campaign, which raised funds for building and modernizing the facilities of its beneficiary agencies; UJA-Federation’s many committees and departments; the JDC and the Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI); and the year 2000 and Solender’s vision of UJA-Federation into the 21st century. A significant amount of topical overlap exists between the UJA-Federation EVP Subject Files and the UJA-Federation Budget Department Subject Files. The first evidence of substantial, permanent correspondence by e-mail appears within SDS’s files.

Historical Note:

Stephen David Solender (SDS) was born in 1938 in New York City. Stephen's father, Sanford, was Executive Vice-President of Federation of New York from 1970-1981. Both Stephen and Sanford emulated Sanford’s father Samuel (for nearly 30 years executive director of the Washington Heights-Inwood YM-YWHA) in their leadership within the Jewish community.

SDS grew up in Mt. Vernon, NY and graduated from Columbia University with a degree in sociology, quickly choosing social work as a profession. While still in school he was vice chairman of the Social Affairs Committee and was the first chairman of Columbia's newly organized Columbia Citizenship Council. He was drawn to communal work as an employee of the 92nd Street Y and as a supervisor at the Bronx House Emanuel summer camps. He graduated from the New York School of Social Work at Columbia University in 1962.

SDS worked for the Jewish Community Centers of Chicago from 1962 to 1969, serving as teen worker and program director. In 1969, he moved to Geneva, Switzerland, working for the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) as Director of Community Centers and Summer Camps there. He helped organize Jewish communal activities in Europe, and as coordinator of programs in Muslim and Arab countries for the JDC, in North Africa and Iran. SDS later became the director of the JDC's Department of Community Centers, Organization and Fund Raising.

In 1975, SDS returned to the United States to become director of social planning and budgeting for the Associated Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, and became its president in 1979.

In 1986, SDS moved to New York to help oversee the merger of the United Jewish Appeal of Greater New York and the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies into United Jewish Appeal Federation of New York, the largest local Jewish Federation in North America and one of the country's largest private philanthropies. SDS served as the organization's Executive Vice-President (EVP) for thirteen years, from 1986 to 1999. SDS succeeded William Kahn as EVP of Federation during the merger transition. He joined Ernest Michel, veteran EVP and campaign director of UJA, as co-EVPs of the merged organization. The goal of the merger was to establish an organization capable of tackling the major social needs of Jews in New York and in Israel. When Michel retired in 1989, SDS became the sole Executive Vice-President of UJA-Federation of New York.

SDS played a key role in the foundation of the United Jewish Communities (UJC) in 1999, formed through a merger of the Council of Jewish Federations, (CJF), United Israel Appeal (UIA), and United Jewish Appeal (UJA). UJC became the central funding and social service system for the American Jewish community; SDS was selected as its first President and CEO and, later as its President Emeritus.

Subsubsubseries d – Dr. John S. Ruskay,  1988-2004 (bulk 1999-2000).

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Executive Vice-Presidents » Dr. John S. Ruskay

12 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical, in three groups:

Chronological Files – chronological, 1993-1999
General Correspondence – alphabetical
Subject Files - alphabetical

Related Material:

Domestic Affairs, for material related to Ruskay’s previous positions at UJA-Federation as Executive Director of Education and
    Community Services, 1993-1995, and Group Vice-President of Program Services, 1996-1999

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – John S. Ruskay [please note John Ruskay’s oral history is suppressed until 2017.]

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Ruskay’s material includes his files from his earlier positions at UJA-Federation, 1993-1999, in particular his Chronological Files.

The Chronological Files, 1993-1999, end in the year Ruskay became Executive Vice-President (EVP). The General Correspondence, 1998-2001, covers the period from Ruskay’s transition to EVP; files later than 2000/2001 are still considered active files and remain with UJA-Federation.

Subject Files (bulk 1993-2002), include many files from Ruskay’s earlier positions at UJA-Federation, and extend into his first few years as EVP. They include correspondence with outside organizations such as Taglit-Birthright Israel, the Center for Learning and Leadership (CLAL), Council of Jewish Federations (CJF), Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI), and United Jewish Communities (UJC), with UJA-Federation leadership and leadership at UJA-Federation camps and community centers.

Historical Note:

John S. Ruskay, PhD, was born in 1946 in New York City and attended the University of Pittsburgh from 1964 to 1968. At Columbia University Ruskay earned his M.A. in 1972 and Ph.D. in 1977 in Political Science, specializing in Middle East Politics. Dr. Ruskay is an author and lecturer in the Jewish communal field.

Staff positions prior to joining UJA-Federation (UJF) include Educational Director of the 92nd Street Y from 1980 to 1985 under Reynold Levy’s leadership, and Vice Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America from 1985 to 1993. Ruskay has served also as a lay leader of many organizations, often serving on the boards and committees. Organizations include: The New Israel Fund, Americans for Peace Now, Breira, the Abraham Joshua Heschel School in Manhattan, the Radius Institute, the Professional Advisory Committee of Brandeis University’s Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program, and he has served as a consultant to the Andrea and Charles Bronfman Foundation and the Wexner Foundation. Ruskay also served on UJF’s Communal Planning Committee from 1987 to 1990, and its Strategic Planning Committee and Subcommittee on Jewish Continuity from 1990 to 1992.

Hired by UJF in 1993, he first held the position of Executive Director of Education and Community Services from 1993 through 1995, and from 1996 to 1999 he served as Group Vice President of Program Services.

In October of 1999, Ruskay was appointed Executive Vice-President and CEO of UJA-Federation of New York and served in that role through June 2014. Ruskay helped raise $2.7 billion for the UJA-Federation of New York during his tenure and increased its endowment from $330 million to $880 million.63

Footnote

Subsubseries ii – Other Executive Staff, 1975—2003

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Other Executive Staff

60 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in five subsubsubseries alphabetically by title.

Related Material:

Domestic Affairs/COO – Jeffrey Solomon, for the only files of Jeffrey Solomon in the collection.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The five subsubsubseries within Other Executive Staff, are:

Jeffrey Solomon has no files from his time as COO of UJA-Federation. His files exist from his years in Domestic Affairs and Program Services.

Historical Note:

Under Stephen D. Solender the senior management within the Executive Department grew to include a Chief Operating Officer (COO). The first COO of UJA-Federation was Jeffrey Solomon, Chief Operating Officer and Senior Vice-President of UJA-Federation, 1996-1997. From 1997 to 1999 Misha Galperin and John Ruskay jointly filled the position of COO.

Other senior executive positions included the COO of Financial Resource Development, the members of the Senior Management Team (later, the Senior Management Group) and the Executive Director of the Office of the President and the Chairman of the Board.

Subsubsubseries a – Chief Operating Officer (COO) – Misha Galperin,  bulk 1997-2001.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Other Executive Staff » Chief Operating Officer (COO) – Misha Galperin

16 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Agency Files and Subject Files - Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Galperin’s files reflect the wide-ranging responsibilities he held as COO. In addition to many Agency files, there are files for various committees and taskforces; foundation files; and files on the work of consultants Ukeles Associates, headed by former Federation Executive Director of Community Services Jack Ukeles.

Historical Note:

Misha Galperin was COO at UJA-Federation of New York from August 1997 to 2001. From 1997 to 1999 he and John Ruskay jointly filled the position, after the departure of their predecessor Jeffrey Solomon (Solomon’s files relate only to his work in Domestic Affairs). As co-COO, Galperin’s basic responsibilities included directing Planning and Allocations; coordinating domestic Communal Planning, Agency Relations, Shared Services, planning Campaigns and the Capital Campaign; overseeing rescue, resettlement and integration of Russian Jews locally and abroad; and Government Relations. From about 1999 he was also responsible for Finance and Administration, Accounting, Personnel and Real Estate.

Subsubsubseries b – Financial Resource Development (FRD), COO – Adam Kahan,  bulk 1993-1996.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Other Executive Staff » Financial Resource Development (FRD), COO - Adam Kahan

8.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Adam B. Kahan

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Files of interest include Kahan’s correspondence, information on departments and divisions, various campaigns, the organizational reorganization in 1994 and 1995 and how it affected FRD, foundations and funds, and the Senior Management Team. Many of the Executive Office files were maintained by Lee Lowell, and some of these files (or similar files) may also be found with Lee Lowell’s files in subsubsubseries c. and d. below. Jeffrey Solomon succeeded Kahan as COO, approximately 1996-1997, although Solomon’s files from this period do not exist here.

Historical Note:

Adam B. Kahan was the Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer for Financial Resource Development (FRD) of UJA-Federation of New York from approximately 1990 to 1995 or 1996. He led key posts in Jewish communal organizations in Israel, South Africa, Great Britain, Canada and the United States, including that of financial spokesman for the Jewish Agency for Israel, before arriving at UJA-Federation. As head of the Financial Resource Division of UJA-Federation, he was in charge of raising funds for human services needs in New York, Israel and 34 countries throughout the world. According to his oral history, Kahan was responsible during his tenure for raising over $2 billion through the Annual, Capital and Specialized Campaigns, Operation Exodus and Planned Giving and Endowments.

Kahan and Jeffrey Solomon, Senior Vice-President, worked directly under Executive Vice-President Stephen D. Solender in the Executive Office.

Subsubsubseries c – Office of the President and Chairman of the Board, Office Directors – Elaine Morris/Lee Lowell Merger files,  bulk 1984-1986.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Other Executive Staff » Office of the President and Chairman of the Board, Office Directors – Elaine Morris/Lee Lowell Merger files

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Executive/Other Executive Staff/Elaine Morris, Director of the Executive Office, for Morris’ Federation files.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Lee Lowell inherited these files relating to the merger between UJA and Federation from Elaine Morris at Federation and her counterpart at UJA. They formed the core of the Executive Office files immediately after the merger, and include correspondence, mailings, meeting materials and other board and materials. Additional Lee Lowell files, from after the merger, are immediately below in Subsubsubseries d, when her title was Executive Director.

Historical Note:

Just prior to the merger between UJA and Federation, Elaine Morris was the Director of the Executive Office at Federation. Lee Lowell was hired as Executive Director of the Office of the President and Chairman of the Board in October 1986 just after the merger took effect. Lowell retained these files after the merger to provide background on the merger as it was happening and as reference material, as the new organization became operational.

After the merger Elaine Morris left UJA-Federation for the Council of Jewish Federations.

Subsubsubseries d – Executive Director, Office of the President and Chairman of the Board - Lee Lowell,  1983-2001 (bulk 1986-2000).

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Other Executive Staff » Executive Director, Office of the President and Chairman of the Board - Lee Lowell

34 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Some files from the UJA and Federation Executive Offices were retained and are included in these files which are otherwise mostly post-merger. File subjects include Annual reports 1992-2000, Board of Directors materials (Board Orientations, Procedures, Council of Overseers meetings, Board of Directors Meetings 1986-1998), Federation Board of Trustees materials, 1983-1985, Chronological Files 1990-1993, Committees, Council of Jewish Federation (CJF) General Assembly files 1985-1996, Meetings of “The Group” and the Organizational Management Team, Overseas Affairs materials, UJA Project Renewal – Hatikvah files from before the merger and various reports.

Historical Note:

Lee Lowell was Executive Director of the Office of the President and Chairman of the Board from about 1986 to 1998. She described her job as managing the governance of UJA-Federation - the Board of Directors, the Executive Committee, various other committees like the Nominating Committee.

Subsubsubseries e – Senior Management Team – Lyn Light Geller,  1993-1994.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Executive » Executive Office » Other Executive Staff » Senior Management Team – Lyn Light Geller

.5 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Contained here are meeting materials for the Senior Management Team, 1993-1994.

Historical Note:

The Senior Management Team was composed of members of the senior professional staff at Federation, later called the Senior Management Group.

Series 2: Administration, 1942—2009 (bulk 1986—1999)

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration

The Series is in English.
188.5 Bankers Boxes
Arrangement:

Arranged in five subseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Administration Series, 1942-2009, contains five subseries:

Subseries A. Administrative Materials, 1990—1996

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Administrative Materials

3 Folders.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The only files to have survived as permanent records from the Administration Department are the three files of printed material contained here: a directory of the UJA-Federation Network, 1995; information for a new professionals orientation, and office directories, 1993, 1996.

Subseries B. Archives and Records Management, 1970—1993

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Archives and Records Management

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

P-933, Colonel Seymour J. Pomrenze Papers

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Contained in Colonel Pomrenze’s Archives and Records Management box is some of his biographical information, mostly pertaining to his work in the Offenbach Depot after World War II. The bulk of these files are survey and process information for different parts of the UJA-Federation collection. Included are files about personal and institutional collections related to UJA-Federation, including the Ernest W. Michel papers (P-901), the Solender Family papers (P-554) and the Baron de Hirsch Fund records (I-80). Also included are reference files documenting requests for information from the archives.

Historical Note:

These are the administrative files of Colonel Seymour J. Pomrenze, the long-time Archives and Records Management consultant for Federation and, later, UJA-Federation. The Colonel had a long, illustrious career as a Monuments Man during and after the end of World War II, as a records manager for the army including in Viet Nam, and as an archives and records management consultant for many Jewish organizations in New York after his retirement. A full biographical statement for the Colonel can be found in the finding aid for his papers.

The records management program started at Federation and continued at UJA-Federation involved surveying records by department. At the start of the project there were record file rooms in the Federation building. As records became inactive in a department they were moved to the file room in a numbered carton. The Colonel’s staff created a folder list for each box, which also included the department name and often the head of the department or the person who created the files or the person who sent the files to storage. The Colonel assigned retention dates to each box, and had files destroyed when it was legally and fiscally prudent to do so. These non-permanent records would have included financial and insurance materials.

Most importantly, he identified the files that were of permanent value, and these boxes were sent to off-site storage. In addition to the Federation files he had been working with since the 1970s, the Colonel worked with what appears to have been a (relatively) small number of UJA boxes that either survived the UJA move from their building on West 58th Street to the Federation office on East 59th Street, or perhaps he worked with UJA briefly before their move, which occurred in stages during the years of the Joint Campaign, 1974-1986.

Each of the boxes that was deemed archival and sent to storage contained a folder list, and copies of each of these folder lists became the basis for understanding the contents of the 3200 boxes that were eventually transferred to the American Jewish Historical Society in 2011 for transformation into this accessible archive collection documenting 95 years of UJA-Federation of New York history.

Subseries C. Finance and Budget, 1942—2000 (bulk 1980—2000)

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Finance and Budget

160 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in five subsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The five subsubseries are:

Historical Note:

The Finance and Budget files document the work of these departments.

Subsubseries i – Annual Agency Files, 1986—2000

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Finance and Budget » Annual Agency Files

105 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Chronological by fiscal year, then Alphabetical by Functional Group and Agency name.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Administration/Finance and Budget/Annual Agency Files, for earlier budget years.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Arranged in chronological order by year or fiscal year.

Within each year, the agencies are arranged by Functional group, and within each group are arranged alphabetically by agency name. This file order mirrors the order used when still in active use by the Budget Department.

While the folder lists are in order, some of the folders are physically located in different boxes, making it necessary to jump back and forth between boxes. Therefore when requesting boxes, be sure to check for the correct box and folder designation.

The Annual Agency Files, created by UJA-Federation’s budget department, contain the budgets of agencies prepared for presentation to the Distribution Committee (later, Appropriations Committee), and the Committee's final grants to agencies. The budget material is rich with financial information such as itemized yearly expenditures as well as correspondence that provides evidence as to how these agencies operated during a particular fiscal year, and how UJA-Federation staff interacted with agency staff. Each folder for a particular agency in the Annual Agency files includes the name of the functional group as part of the folder title, together with the name of the agency.

Historical Note:

The Annual Agency Files document the budgets created by the Budget Department, based on the previous year’s allocation, performance during the year and budgetary (or extra-budgetary) requests for the coming year. Finalized budgets were presented at Budget conferences to Distribution Subcommittees and, ultimately, to the Board of Directors for final approval.

Subsubseries ii – Budget Department Subject Files, 1942—2000 (bulk 1984—2000)

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Finance and Budget » Budget Department Subject Files

40 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Budget Department Subject Files are the administrative files maintained by the Budget Department, 1986-2000. They do not include material that is other subsubseries, such as Financial Reports or the Annual Agency Files. The Subject Files are a good source of information on many topics covered by the Board of Directors that involved the agency budgeting process. These files include correspondence with the affiliated agencies, Capital Campaign budgetary issues and many committee files and minutes including the various Distribution Committee and Communal Planning subcommittees. Many of are here, 1989-1995. Funds and Grants files are also extensive, as are Special Funds Program files.

Specially funded projects are included, including Operation Exodus and Project Renewal, and Functional Groups are listed under a section titled “Reserves”.

Additional information on the Budget Department Subject Files can be found here.

Historical Note:

Budget Directors included:

1986-1989Philip Friedman
1989-1994Steven Rosenbloom
1994-1997Arthur Sandman
1997-2000Maggie Bar-Tura

Subsubseries iii – Chief Financial Officer Files, 1981—2000

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Finance and Budget » Chief Financial Officer Files

8.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Agency Files – Alphabetical
Subject Files - Alphabetical

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Files of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) are predominately from James Rothkopf’s tenure, with later files from the office of his successor Jay Gold through 2000; after 2000 the CFO files remain active and with UJA-Federation.

The first 1.5 boxes are Agency Files, containing correspondence and financial planning specific to these agencies. During this period the Associated YM-YWHAs of Greater New York were going through financial difficulties, which are reflected in these files.

The Subject Files cover all the issues that crossed the desk of the CFO, including campaign files, cash collections and receipts, chronological files 1990—2000 (bulk 1996—2000), Board of Directors meetings as well as many files pertaining to the meetings of the Audit Committee, the Finance Committee and the Investment Committee. Y2K files appear briefly under Jay Gold’s tenure, 1997-2000, during the years of worry and planning for software capabilities having to do with the rollover to the new century.

Historical Note:

In 1997, the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) reported directly to the Executive Vice-President/Chief Executive Officer and supervised a financial staff of 20 people. Typically, the CFO possessed an advanced degree in business or finance. The CFO was responsible for the strategic leadership as well as the implementation of the long-term financial plan for this highly complex, not-for-profit organization, which raised funds in excess of $200 million annually. One of the main responsibilities of the CFO was to “partner with the Executive Vice-President/Chief Executive Officer to conceptualize the organization’s strategic plan, develop alternative financial solutions so management and the Board will have a clearly defined set of fiscal options to select from, present those options to the Board, gain consensus as to the best course to follow, and implement the plan”. (from the position specification, October 1997)

Approximately 1988—1998James Rothkopf
March 1998—2000Jay Gold

Subsubseries iv – Controller Files, 1980—1987

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Finance and Budget » Controller Files

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subsubseries ii – Budget Department Subject Files, for three additional files from Controller Sam Holman, 1987

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files are from the tenure of Jason Cury as UJA-Federation Controller, most dating from prior to the merger.

Historical Note:

The Controller manages the Accounting Department.

Subsubseries v – Financial Reports - Audited Reports, 1979—1995

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Finance and Budget » Financial Reports - Audited Reports

5.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Functional Group number order, then alphabetical by agency.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Each Agency represented here with a file on their Audited Financial Reports has its own date range, depending on which years were found in the files.

Historical Note:

Each Agency prepared Financial Reports annually which were required to be audited by a Certified Public Accountant. The reports here are a selection of these reports.

Subseries D. Legal, 1944—2004

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Legal

25 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The two subsubseries are:

Historical Note:

The Legal Department handled most of the legal and governance issues at UJA-Federation. They worked with the Law Committee, senior management and lay leaders as situations required the assistance of in-house counsel.

Subsubseries i – Joyce S. Dubensky Files, 1944—1999

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Legal » Joyce S. Dubensky Files

22 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Board Minutes – Chronological, 1988-1999
Merger Files – Arranged by Case File Number, 57G-57P, 1944, 1975-1986
Subject Files – Alphabetical, 1950-1999

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Board Minutes files contain mostly drafts of minutes.

The Merger Files contain older material used as reference in preparing the merger governance documents. This group of files, three bankers boxes, are arranged by the case file number assigned by the legal department, and contain many key documents created for the merger.

The Subject Files contain a wide range of topics including committee files (Finance Committee, Executive Committee, Domestic Affairs Division Steering Committee, Distribution Committee, Government Support Implications Committee, Overseas Affairs Division, et al), campaign contracts, by-laws drafts/revisions/ amendments/interpretations, a large selection of historical documentation on the Henry Kaufmann Campgrounds and UJA-Federation governance issues.

Historical Note:

Joyce Dubensky was General Counsel for UJA-Federation through 1994 after holding that position at least from 1984—1986 at Federation.

Subsubseries ii – Ellen Zimmerman Files, 1982—2004

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Legal » Ellen Zimmerman Files

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Ellen Zimmerman’s Files include the following subjects: FEDVentures, and other UJA-Federation governance issues.

Historical Note:

Ellen Zimmerman followed Joyce Dubensky as General Counsel for UJA-Federation in 1994 or 1995; files more recent than those found here have been retained by her office as active files.

Subseries E. Shared Services and Administration – Bonnie Shevins, Executive Director, bulk 1988—1998

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Administration » Shared Services and Administration – Bonnie Shevins, Executive Director

2.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Files of interest include those on FEDVentures, created in 1994 to serve as the group contracting service of UJA-Fed’s agency network, after the termination of the agreement with JPC, which was not supportive enough of non-healthcare agencies. (from a report to the UJA-Federation Board of Governors, 9/17/98)

Other files concern the Greater New York Hospital Association Services, the Personnel Crisis Committee and the United Jewish Appeal Federation Agency Partnership.

Historical Note:

A Department in the Administration Division of UJA-Federation beginning in the mid-1990s, Shared Services replaced the Joint Purchasing Corporation (JPC) as the in house purchasing agent. JPC began in 1922 for group purchasing of supplies, oil and coal, foodstuffs, etc. In 1976 JPC extended services to any not-for-profit in metropolitan New York; in the 1980s it extended its services beyond New York. In 1990 their offices were still at 130 E. 59th street; the files indicate that their relationship with UJA-Federation was under discussion, and the relationship was in fact terminated in 1992.

Bonnie K. Shevins was Executive Director of Shared Services and Administration approximately 1993-1997. She held related positions at UJA-Federation beginning in about 1989. Later Shevins became Group Vice-President of Strategic Management.

Series 3: Domestic Affairs, 1946—2004 (bulk dates 1986—1994)

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs

The Series is in English.
121 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in six subseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The six subseries are:

Historical Note:

Domestic Affairs replaced Federation’s Community Services Division after the merger with UJA. (UJA’s Overseas projects also became a division in the combined organization. Domestic Affairs and Overseas Affairs were combined around 1994 into Program Services.) According to an October 1985 memorandum from Daniel Shapiro as part of the Committee to Explore the Future Relationship of UJA and Federation (CEFRUF), to Federation leaders, the Domestic Affairs Division

will carry on the matters and business which relate to the Federation network of agencies and are currently handled by Federation. The structure and governance of the Division will recognize the key roles of agencies … The Domestic Affairs Division will be responsible for communal planning, local services and distribution of funds to local agencies. Level of grants, affiliation and disaffiliation of agencies and all other policy questions affecting the agencies will be the responsibility of this Division. There will be an Overseas Affairs Division which will handle the business currently done by New York UJA and a Campaign Division.64

Jeffrey Solomon was the Chief Operating Officer of Domestic Affairs, and later became Executive Director of Program Services. John Ruskay replaced Solomon in this position, with the title of Group Vice-President of Program Services.

The domestic portion of Program Services was called Health and Human Services, which included all of the original Federation functional grouping of agencies into one division. Harvey Newman was the Executive Director of Health and Human Services for a number of years, from approximately 1991 until his departure from UJA-Federation in May 1998. In 1994/1995 Health and Human Services had been renamed Agency Relations.

Footnote

Subseries A. Community Development, Housing & Neighborhood Preservation, 1980—1997

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Development, Housing & Neighborhood Preservation

12 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubsubseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Agencies and Support-Community Services/Functional Groups/Community Development-Neighborhood Preservation, for earlier Federation files.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The two subsubsubseries are:

Historical Note:

After UJA and Federation began their Joint Campaign in 1974, Federation began the Neighborhood Preservation program in New York to mirror UJA’s Project Renewal program in Israel. Both programs funded specific projects in specific communities. In New York, the targeted communities suffered from declining, aging Jewish populations, a lack of jobs, increasing crime, and inadequate housing.

According to The Tradition Continues, Federation’s 1985-1986 Annual Report, President Daniel S. Shapiro wrote about Neighborhood Preservation: … “the Neighborhood Preservation Program … supports local efforts in 20 target areas, most of which are home to a number of Federation agencies … a Neighborhood Preservation Loan Fund will strengthen efforts for rehabilitating housing, home purchase down payment assistance, neighborhood marketing and promotion, and technical assistance workshops. Federation has increased its support to, and cooperative ventures with, the Jewish Community Relations Council, the Metropolitan New York Coordinating Council on Jewish Poverty, over 30 local Jewish community councils, and the Coalition to Free Soviet Jewry. Each provides critical outreach and community relations programs serving the Jewish community.”65

Joseph Langer was the Director of Community Development and Neighborhood Preservation programs, which continued through the merger with UJA, until the early 1990s.

A July 1989 memo “Overview of Domestic Affairs Division” from Jeffrey Solomon’s Files (Subseries F) describes the work of the department as community and housing development, neighborhood planning and revitalization, housing policy, geographic planning and services to special population groups. Recently completed studies include those on Staten Island, Bronx, Queens, Suffolk, with the study on Nassau County planned next.

For more information about the Community Development, Housing and Neighborhood Preservation programs at Federation and UJA-Federation, see the following blog posts:

Footnote

Subsubseries i – Joseph Langer, Director – Subject Files, 1980—1995

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Development, Housing & Neighborhood Preservation » Joseph Langer, Director – Subject Files

8 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Subjects of interest in Langer’s files include Designated Organizations Committee budget conference material, Distribution Committee Subcommittee material, Housing and Neighborhood Preservation Committee files and issues related to the resettlement of Soviet refugees. Various neighborhood community councils also have files in this subsubseries.

Historical Note:

Joseph Langer continued his work as Director of Federation’s Community Development and Neighborhood Preservation Department for a few years after the merger with UJA. His files end in 1990.

Subsubseries ii – Cindy Masters, Assistant Director, 1985—1998

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Development, Housing & Neighborhood Preservation » Cindy Masters, Assistant Director

4 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Agency and Subject Files, each arranged alphabetically.

Related Material:

Community Services and Planning/Human Services/Cindy Masters, for additional Cindy Masters files from the Human Services Department.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Agency Files include Council of Jewish Organizations of Boro Park, Flatbush and Staten Island; Jackson Heights-Elmhurst Kehillah; Jewish Community Councils of Crown Heights, Canarsie, Mount Vernon, Pelham Parkway and others. Subject files include the Distribution Committee subcommittee on Community Development and the Allied Agencies Review Committee.

Historical Note:

Cindy Masters was the Assistant Director of Community Development and Neighborhood Preservation during at least 1991—1993; she may have succeeded Joseph Langer as Director after 1993. Records are incomplete.

Subseries B. Community Services and Planning, 1946—2002

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning

88.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in five subsubseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Agencies and Support-Community Services
Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Rachel R. Lieberman

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The five subsubseries are:

Historical Note:

Community Services and Planning began at Federation in the mid-1970s. Initially working in the Government Relations Department to establish relationships with government and outside foundations to best take advantage of the funding opportunities these sources offered, Ricki Radlo Lieberman successfully put together funding for many social programs including neighborhood service centers, single-parent families and Jews living in poverty, and worked to launch Federation’s resettlement program for Russian Jews immigrating to New York.

Lieberman’s Department evolved into the Resources Development Department, which grew to include program development as Lieberman linked programs and agencies with funding sources. Lieberman recruited a former colleague, Stephanie K. Newman, to replace her when Lieberman left Federation in 1977. Newman held the position for ten years, through the merger with UJA, when Lieberman was asked to return to run a larger and more complex department, now called Community Services and Planning. Lieberman remained in the position of Director of this department from 1987 to 1991, when a reorganization would have drastically changed her role. None of her files survive in this department, but the voluminous files in this subseries from the years 1987-1991, would have been created under her direction.

A July 1989 memo “Overview of Domestic Affairs Division” from Jeffrey Solomon’s Files describes the work of the Community Services and Planning Department as liaison to agencies regarding planning and allocations, with staff serving as consultants in their respective functional fields. Also involved are programs and staff for program evaluation, Management Assistance Program (skilled volunteer consultants for agencies), linking the public with human services providers through the services of the Jewish Information and Referral Service (JIRS), Russian resettlement, Jewish arts and AIDS programs.

Subsubseries i – Community Centers and Ys/Group Services, 1965—1995

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Community Centers and Ys/Group Services

36 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subsubsubseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Agencies and Support-Community Services/Functional Groups/Community Centers, Camping and Jewish Education

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The four subsubsubseries are:

Camping Services are included in these files, although the bulk of the files pertain more specifically to the Community Centers and Ys.

Historical Note:

Variously called Community Centers and Ys and Group Services, and including at times Camping Services and/or Jewish Education programs that were based at Ys and at summer camps, this subsubseries continues Federation’s work with Community Centers and Camping.

Community Centers and Ys and Camping Services include the agencies that had been affiliated with Federation; they were serviced in a similar manner after the merger with UJA, with some of the UJA-Federation staff providing services to Federation’s local programs.

In 1987, soon after the merger, Joseph Harris was the outgoing Executive Director of Group Services and Jewish Education. Stephen Doochin was the Associate Director, working mainly with Community Centers and Ys. Asher Melzer continued after the merger as Director of Camping Services.

Subsubsubseries a – Associate Director - Stephen Doochin,  1981-1990.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Community Centers and Ys/Group Services » Associate Director - Stephen Doochin

2.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Agencies and Support-Community Services/Functional Groups/Community Centers, Camping & Jewish Education/Directors – Joseph Harris

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files include Special Funds and Grants, community studies and reports, committee materials and some agency subject files.

Historical Note:

These Community Center and Ys files are the continuation of Federation’s files, through the merger with UJA. Doochin started at Federation in 1981, and became Associate Director of Community Services under Joseph Harris in November 1985. His Community Center files end in 1990, but he continued to work at UJA-Federation until 2002, first in the Wiener Educational Center, at least 1990-1991, and then as UJA-Federation Campaign Director for Westchester.

Although Joseph Harris continued as Director of Group Services and Jewish Education through 1987, all of his files are located in Subgroup I.

Subsubsubseries b – Associated YM-YWHAs,  1957—1995.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Community Centers and Ys/Group Services » Associated YM-YWHAs

11.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged by title:

  • Associate Director - Jerome Mark
  • Financial Consultant – Myron Strober

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Associated Ys material includes mainly the business of running this group of Ys – financial, legal and real estate issues – rather than the programming materials of other Community Services and YM-YWHA files in the collection.

Associate Director Jerome Mark files include files of Personnel Committee business, legal files dealing with the Gustave Hartman Y in Far Rockaway and lease and property issues. Some of the files include documents extending back into earlier Federation history in the 1970s and 1980s prior to the merger with UJA. Mark’s Executive Files deal mostly with governance issues, included Board of Directors and Steering Committee meetings and details of a “Workout Plan”, mostly centered around the reorganization. Mark’s Financial Files relate entirely to real estate issues, mostly of the Gustave Hartman Y – tax files having to do with the specific block and lot numbers that in New York City identify ownership of individual real estate properties. Agency Files include subject files on individual community centers.

The Myron Strober Files are financial in nature and focus on the reorganization plan for the Associated Ys.

Historical Note:

The Associated YM-YWHAs of Greater New York was formed in 1957 by of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies

“to evaluate needs for community centers based on Jewish neighborhood populations, current and anticipated; to construct and operate these centers; to assist in planning and raising the necessary funds. Its creation followed the merger of four existing organizations – the Jewish Association for Neighborhood Centers, the East Tremont YM-YWHA, the Shorefront YM-YWHAs and the Jewish Community Center of the Rockaways.”66

The agencies’ mandate was to provide for Jewish communal needs by both building community centers where necessary and providing programs adequate to neighborhood needs.

The Associated Ys were reorganized in 1991-1992; Myron Strober was the financial consultant for the Associated Ys during this reorganization. According to a 1991 proposal in Strober’s Administrative file, “[a] substantial network of community centers has been created over the past 34 years, always in response to changing demographic and social needs of Jewish community”.

In 1991 there were 10 local Ys and 8 Senior Centers affiliated with the Associated Ys.

Jerome Mark was the Associate Director of the Associated Ys, 1985—1991; Acting Executive Director of the Associated Ys in about 1991; Executive Director of the Associated Ys in about 1993; and (probably at the same time) Director of Camping Services for UJA-Federation, 1992—1993.

For background on the camping program that is part of Jerome Mark’s files, see the blog post, Camping Services Material in the UJA Collection.

Footnote

Subsubsubseries c – Director – William Rothchild,  1982-1992.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Community Centers and Ys/Group Services » Director – William Rothchild

7 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Rothchild’s files include subject and budgetary files on the individual community centers, and other agencies that included programs affiliated with the community center programming for specific segments of the population such as at the Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged and Penn South. About one box of Restricted Grant Applications are also arranged by agency.

Files on the Distribution Subcommittee on Community Centers (DCCC) cover meetings in the years just after the UJA-Federation merger and leading up to the 1991-1992 reorganization, 1986-1990. There are a number of folders of “Trends and Developments” reports, 1986-1989, which are narrative summaries from agencies to the Distribution Committee and often submitted with budgetary material.

Historical Note:

William Rothchild was director of UJA-Federation Community Centers from about June 1988 to at least 1990. In 1991 his title was Director of Jewish Community Centers (JCCs).

Subsubsubseries d – Jewish Education,  1982—1995.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Community Centers and Ys/Group Services » Jewish Education

15 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Agencies and Support-Community Services/Functional Groups/Community Centers, Camping and Jewish Education, for earlier information on Federation’s Jewish Education work.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Wasserman’s files document his involvement with several Jewish education agencies such as the B’nai B’rith Hillel/Jewish Association for College Youth (BBH/JACY) and the Jewish Educational Service of North America (JESNA). The files also contain material on UJA-Federation’s Jewish Continuity Commission, the Communal Planning Committee (CPC) and the Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Jewish Education (DCJE).

About half of Wasserman’s files relate to the Fund for Jewish Education. In addition, Special Funds files account for nearly a box of material. Joseph Gruss and his family were active funders of the Jewish Education work of Federation through the Fund for Jewish Education. The continuation of some of this funding can be seen in Howard Wasserman’s files.

For additional information on Howard Wasserman’s Jewish Education files, see the blog post "Jewish Education at UJA-Federation".

Historical Note:

Howard Wasserman was Executive Director of the Jewish Education department at UJA-Federation from 1989 to 1994. Prior to Wasserman was Chaim Botwinick who served as Executive Director of Jewish Education from late 1987 to beginning of 1989. A handful of Botwinick’s files are included with Wasserman’s. (Botwinick succeeded Joseph Harris, who had been head of Jewish Education for Federation and through the first budget year after the merger.)

Wasserman had earlier been Executive Vice-President of the Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst, one of UJA-Federation’s affiliated agencies. Approximately half of Wasserman’s files here relate to his involvement with the Fund for Jewish Education (FJE), of which he served as Director of Outreach and Special Projects through the early 1990s. His successor in this role was Debra Niderberg; information in the files reports that Niderberg reviewed 200 proposals annually, monitored 60 grants, and managed a budget of $700,000.

In approximately 1993, the Jewish Education department/functional group was reorganized and became known as the Commission on Jewish Identity and Renewal (CoJIR).

For very early history on Federation’s nascent Jewish Education plan, see the blog post 1917 Provision for Jewish Education.

Subsubseries ii – Foundations and Foundation Services—Lavanburg-Corner House, 1946—1996

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Foundations and Foundation Services—Lavanburg-Corner House

6 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Agency and Subject Files are arranged alphabetically.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies - FJP/agencies and support-community services/resources and development/Stephanie Newman files, for earlier Lavanburg-Corner House files

I-518, Lavanburg-Corner House Fund

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files are mostly those of Lauren Katzowitz. More than three boxes contain files on agencies that were either funded by LCH or that had applied for funding from LCH. The remaining Subject files contain Board of Directors meeting minutes and information about the Board, and financial and legal matters relating to grant commitments and taxes. Two folders of history are also included.

Historical Note:

The minutes of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies’ Board of Trustees, September 1981 indicate that the Federation Foundation Service was created to service private foundations, “to help small foundations operate more efficiently”67. The hope was also that those foundations, who would be housed in the Federation building, would be generous to Federation agencies in their giving.

In 1982 The Foundation Service of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York assumed responsibility for assisting the Board of Directors of the Lavanburg-Corner House, Inc. by taking over correspondence and other communications, by processing all inquiries and grant applications and managing the grant process, and by managing all Board business.

A brief history of the Lavanburg-Corner House (LCH): Solomon Lowenstein, the Executive Director/Executive Vice-President of Federation from 1920-1942, was the Executive Director of the Hebrew Orphan Asylum (HOA) in 1915 when he approached Mrs. Henry M. Block in 1915 to create a facility that could provide “further guidance for boys who were leaving the [HOA] and still not sufficiently matured to make their own way”.

The original Corner House opened in 1916 at 21 Charles Street (on the corner of what was then Varick Street) to house 20 boys, with beds and other supplies donated by the HOA. The 5 members of the original Board of Trustees chose the name “Corner House” after much discussion, in order to avoid using an institutional name like “home” or “club”. The need for such a facility grew quickly and the Corner House acquired more space in other buildings on Charles Street and later on West 14th Street. By 1933 the Corner House had merged with the Hannah Lavanburg Home at 333 E. 12th Street, forming the Lavanburg-Corner House with a capacity to serve 110 boys.

Services offered and locations changed through the decades. Eventually it ceased operating its own facilities and became a funding organization exclusively, funding existing organizations within New York City that were also concerned with the care of children and youth. In 1982, as stated above, Lavanburg-Corner House became affiliated with the Foundation Service of Federation. In 1996 Lavanburg-Corner House distributed its final grants and ceased operations.

The Directors of Foundation Service:
Robert Goldmann, 1982—1986
Lauren Katzowitz, 1986 until approximately 1996

Footnote

Subsubseries iii – Human Services, 1971—2002

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Human Services

20.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by title.

Related Material:

Domestic Affairs/Community Development, Housing and Neighborhood Preservation, for additional Cindy Masters files related to Community Development

Domestic Affairs/Community Services and Planning/Immigrant Services and Special Projects, for additional materials on UJA-Federation’s AIDS project and other special programs including Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORC)

For additional AIDS material, see:
Government Relations; AIDS programs were eventually part of UJA-Federation’s Caring Commission run by Robert Leiner

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files in Human Services are those of the following staff members:

Director Harvey Goldman; staff files of Roberta Beer Fried, Program Coordinator; Cindy Masters, Assistant Director; and Elise Slobodin.

Harvey Goldman files within the Human Services subsubseries comprises 16 boxes of Agency Files, Affiliation Review Committee and other committee meeting files, neighborhood task forces and groups and Housing and Neighborhood Preservation material, Jewish Information and Referral Service (JIRS) statistics and reports and consultant files. Harvey Goldman’s files incorporate some of Ricki Lieberman’s files where he continued to add to these files.

The remaining five boxes are mixed staff files from the Human Services Department, arranged in alphabetical order by subject as they seemed to have been organized when in active use. They include the files of Roberta Beer Fried, Cindy Masters and Elise Slobodin and cover the normal work of the department plus special program areas which include AIDS, Breast and Ovarian Cancer and coordination with the group One Hundred Black Men.

Historical Note:

Human Services was the successor department to Federation’s FCVR Functional Group, which managed agencies that serviced the needs of Families and Children, especially in terms of Vocational and Rehabilitation needs. In about 1994 “Human Services” was changed to “Agency Relations” or “Agency Relations and Resource Development”. By 1997/1998 UJA-Federation had adopted the term “commission” to group areas of their work, and Human Services became part of the Jewish Communal Network Commission (JCNC); the name change to JCNC occurred after the date range of these files except for a very small number of documents. JCNC provided funding and services to agencies, as explained by Lyn Light Geller in a telephone call in 2014, and was the only commission to operate within the network structure.

Also in 1997/1998 the term “affiliated agency”, long-used by Federation and then UJA-Federation, became “allied agency”.

Based on the files, the following dates and job titles and department names may be helpful. The dates are based on documentation in the files and do not necessarily reflect the complete date range of a staff person’s years of service:

1985-1988 – Dr. Jaclynn Faffer – Executive Director of Human Services
1992-1999 - Harvey Goldman – Executive Director of Human Services/Agency Relations and Resource Development
1998-2000 - Roberta Beer Fried, Program Coordinator, particularly for the AIDS program begun by Simha Rosenberg; later, Fried was Assistant Director in charge of Agency Relations; also Assistant Director, Jewish Communal Network Commission

In the late 1990s, Community Development became part of Agency Relations; Cindy Masters transferred at this time with the department and became Assistant Director of Human Services. Judith Elkin was a Human Services Staff Associate 1987-1988 who worked on Day Care and Substance abuse.

Subsubseries iv – Medical and Geriatrics Services, Robert Wolf, Director – Subject Files, 1983—2000

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Medical and Geriatrics Services, Robert Wolf, Director – Subject Files

7.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Immigrant Services and Special Projects/Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities, for additional NORC files

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Agencies and Support-Community Services/Functional Groups/Medical Care and Services to the Aged

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files include agency files, Communal Planning Committee meetings, Distribution Committee Subcommittees and Distribution Committee Special funds proposals, Feinberg Lecture Series for the Aged files, files on Jewish Association for Services for the Aged (JASA), the first files noticed in the collection titled Managed Care and reports and budgets connected with UJA-Federation’s work on Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs).

Historical Note:

Robert Wolf was the Executive Director for Medical and Geriatric Programs (later, the Caring Commission) from about 1988 to 200968. This department continued the work of Federation’s Functional Group on Medical Care and Services to the Aged.

For further information see the blog post: Care of Aged and Infirm

Footnote

Subsubseries v – Immigrant Services and Special Projects, 1975—2001

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Immigrant Services and Special Projects

18.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subsubsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Immigrant Services and Special Projects files were created by Caroline Katz, Judy Zorfas, and Simha Rosenberg, and reflect their work in the department, including work with the Communal Planning Committee and Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Immigrants and Refugees. Files largely date from the late 1980s through the late 1990s.

Historical Note:

The Immigrant Services and Special Projects department of Domestic Affairs was established in response to the continuing need for resettlement services for Jewish immigrants, largely from the Soviet Union, in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Resettlement services had previously been provided by the Subcommittee on Services to New Jewish Immigrants, overseen by Stephanie Newman and Michelle Mindlin in Federation’s Department of Community Services Division, Resources and Development Department. With the departure of these two staff members after the merger, Caroline Katz was appointed Director and Judy Zorfas appointed Assistant Director of the new department in 1987. The department coordinated multiple committees charged to provide services regionally (including in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens), to populations (including children, adolescents, and older adults), and regarding specific areas of need (employment, acculturation, language skills, mental health, etc.).

In 1990, the Communal Planning Committee and the Distribution Committee established the joint Subcommittee on Immigrants and Refugees, chaired by Judge Jack Weinstein and Joan Jacobson, to assure that a continuum of resettlement services was provided to Soviet Jewish emigres. This committee oversaw all aspects of UJA-Federation local agency involvement in refugee and immigrant resettlement. Working with the New York Association for New Americans (NYANA, a national organization that received annual allocations from UJA-Federation referred to as subventions; subvented organizations were later renamed “designated organizations”), which provided initial resettlement services, UJA-Federation agencies such as Federation Employment and Guidance Services (FEGS), Board of Jewish Education (BJE), Jewish Association Serving the Aging (JASA), Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS), and Jewish Child Care Association (JCCA) then offered social services and acculturation programs. This committee also sponsored the Professional Task Force on Immigrants and Refugees, which sought to resettle refugees more effectively and at less cost to the Jewish community. The Task Force was comprised of UJA-Federation staff and over one hundred professionals from various agencies, and major initiatives included responding to the Resettlement Planning Study of 1990, and the publication of the Resettlement Newsletter.

Subsubsubseries a – Director - Caroline Katz files,  bulk 1980-1999.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Immigrant Services and Special Projects » Director - Caroline Katz files

6 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in Agency and Subject files, then alphabetically.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Files date from the late 1980s through the late 1990s, and belong to Caroline Katz (including Katz’s copies of Assistant Director Judy Zorfas’s files). This section is comprised of agency files and subject files, which include Katz’s work with committees, her chronological files, and her grants work.

Historical Note:

Caroline Katz was appointed Director of Immigrant Services and Special Projects in 1987, and held that role until 2007/2008. In this capacity, she worked to provide resettlement and acculturation services to Jewish immigrants, largely from the Soviet Union but also from Yemen, Bukharia, and Persia. She worked with and oversaw regional, population, and service-specific committees, and also worked with the Communal Planning Committee and Distribution Committee’s Subcommittee on Immigrants and Refugees and the Professional Task Force on Immigrants and Refugees.

Subsubsubseries b – Project Coordinator - Simha Rosenberg files - AIDS project,  1985-2001.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Immigrant Services and Special Projects » Project Coordinator - Simha Rosenberg files - AIDS project

11 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files date from 1985 - 2001, with the bulk of files from the late 1980s – mid 1990s. Important themes include conferences, both outside and UJF-organized; committees; fundraising; grants; legislation and governmental issues (local, state, federal); press coverage and medical research; educational workshops for staff and the public; activism; agencies and printed material.

Historical Note:

In the 1980s AIDS had reached epidemic proportions in New York City and UJA-Federation channeled some of its philanthropic services toward this crisis, establishing a Special Project for AIDS. Under Coordinator Simha Rosenberg, the project operated with an over one million dollar annual budget and conducted educational workshops about AIDS for agency staff and (the agency-using public). Substantial feedback was sought from the participants of these workshops and can be found in files labeled AIDS Education and Training (AET) Evaluations. This data provides researchers with information about the attitudes and knowledge of youth and adults regarding AIDS specifically and sexuality generally at that time. The project also provided services to people with AIDS, with special outreach provided to AIDS patients within the Jewish community, through its city-wide network of agencies and community centers. These files document that work and the grants necessary to fund it. Rosenberg acted as UJA-Federation’s representative on several local, state-wide, and federal AIDS coalitions and those activities are also documented here.

Subsubsubseries c – Project Coordinator - Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORC) project,  1986-1996.

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Community Services and Planning » Immigrant Services and Special Projects » Project Coordinator - Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORC) project

1.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files date from 1986- 1996, and include Rosenberg’s work with specific NORCs including Penn South, with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, as well as her advocacy and public relations work for NORCs in general.

Historical Note:

Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs) are apartment dwellings in New York City in which older adults are the predominant residents. In the mid-1980s, UJA-Federation began targeting health and social services to these populations, offering a variety of healthy aging, independence-building, and community engagement programs. Project Coordinator Simha Rosenberg oversaw efforts in these areas, including grant proposals for services and program development.

Subseries C. Program Evaluation, 1983-1990

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Program Evaluation

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by subject.

Processing Information:

All other Program Evaluation boxes were lost in the Citi-Storage warehouse fire in January 2015.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files belong to Alisa Trugerman, a Program Evaluation Manager, and date from 1983 – 1990. This one box is comprised of evaluations of various types of UJA-Federation agencies and services, including YM-YWHAs, JCCs, programs for youth, elderly, and disabled, and housing services.

Historical Note:

This is the only surviving box of evaluation forms for programs of the UJA-Federation agencies, and therefore serves as a representative sample of the department. Other material from this subseries likely covered evaluations of programs in agencies from all of the functional groups.

Subseries D. Commission on Synagogue Relations/Committee on Religious Affairs, 1972—1995

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Commission on Synagogue Relations/Committee on Religious Affairs

5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Other Departments/Religious Affairs - Rabbi Isaac N. Trainin Subject Files

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Commission on Synagogue Relations/Committee on Religious Affairs files were created by Associate Director Ann Plutzer and Librarian Consultant Marcia Posner, and reflect their work in the department, including work with various task forces. Files date from 1967 to 1995, with bulk dates in the 1980s and early 1990s.

Historical Note:

Established in 1954 as the Religious Affairs Department and headed by Rabbi Isaac Trainin until 1986, the Commission on Synagogue Relations/Committee on Religious Affairs further developed UJA-Federation’s relationship with synagogues and focused on day to day issues of Jewish life. The department had previously coordinated numerous task forces and subcommittees on Jewish communal service, the arts in Jewish life, and Jewish singles, among others, and after the merger in 1986 and under the new leadership of Executive Director Rabbi Hillel Friedman, the department added a Task Force on the Jewish Woman, a Task Force on Addictions, programming for integration of Israeli immigrants, and more Jewish family educational programming. This department also worked closely with various Communal Planning Committee subcommittees on children’s issues.

Subsubseries i – Associate Director - Ann Plutzer, 1978—1995

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Commission on Synagogue Relations/Committee on Religious Affairs » Associate Director - Ann Plutzer

4 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetically by committee and task force, followed by alphabetical subject files.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Ann Plutzer’s files date from 1978 through 1995, with bulk dates in the late 1980’s and early 1990s. Major subjects include work with various subcommittees and task forces, as well as the day to day operations of the department including budgeting, purchasing, and scheduling meetings.

Historical Note:

Ann Plutzer was Associate Director of the Commission on Synagogue Relations in the late 1980s and early 1990s, under Executive Director Rabbi Hillel Friedman. She was also active on various subcommittees, including the Public Policy Subcommittee and the Subcommittee on Jewish Women in the Arts.

Subsubseries ii – Task Force on Art and Literature - Marcia Posner, librarian, 1972—1994

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Commission on Synagogue Relations/Committee on Religious Affairs » Task Force on Art and Literature - Marcia Posner, librarian

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Arranged by agency libraries and subjects, then alphabetically.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files belong to Marcia Posner and date from the early 1970s through the early 1990s. They reflect Posner’s work to establish Judaica libraries in many UJA-Federation agencies.

Historical Note:

Marcia Posner worked as a librarian consultant, under the Commission on Synagogue Relations, to establish libraries with Judaic materials in a number of UJA-Federation agencies, including camps, YM-YWHAs and JCCs, social services agencies, and homes for the elderly. Funding for these libraries came from the Reiss Judaica Libraries Fund. Posner was hired in 1984 by Seymour Grabel, chair of the Task Force on Art and Literature in Jewish Life, and worked through the early 1990s.

Subseries E. Wiener Educational Center, 1976-2004

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Wiener Educational Center

10 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by subject.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files belong to Director Lyn Light Geller, and date from the mid-1970s through the mid-2000s, with bulk dates in the 1990s and early 2000s. Files include information on a Former Soviet Union (FSU) mission, Educational Days programming at UJA-Federation for career and training information, and a large section on programming in response to 9/11.

Historical Note:

The Wiener Educational Center was created in 1969 through the William E. Wiener Endowment and Charles and Rosanna Bachelor Endowment Funds for the purpose of providing educational and professional advancement opportunities to the staffs of UJA-Federation and its agencies. It evolved into a comprehensive collection of staff development activities whose primary objectives were to encourage the development of promising agency professionals by providing knowledge and skills in management, community organization and Jewish education; to promote dialogue between lay and professional leadership of UJA-Federation and deliver specialized training activities; and to foster opportunities for mutual exploration of professional, Jewish and societal issues. Since 1992, Lyn Light Geller has served as Director of the Wiener Educational Center.

Subseries F. Chief Operating Officer of Domestic Services – Jeffrey Solomon Files, 1986-1996

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Domestic Affairs » Chief Operating Officer of Domestic Services – Jeffrey Solomon Files

5.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/Stephen D. Solender, under whom Solomon worked as COO of UJA-Federation

Executive/Executive Vice-Presidents/John Ruskay, for John Ruskay files from the period he worked in Program Services

Executive/Other Executive Staff/COO, for files of Misha Galperin

Subgroup V – Oral History Project – Jeffrey Solomon

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files reflect Solomon’s time as Chief Operating Officer of the Domestic Affairs Division, 1986-1993, and include these topics: Agency Relations Committee, Altro Health and Rehabilitation Services (during the period Altro was going out of business), Domestic Affairs Assembly, Domestic Affairs Cabinet and Domestic Affairs Division Steering Committee, Federation Agency Executive Committee, and Strategic Planning Committee.

Biographical Note:

Jeffrey Solomon was the Chief Operating Officer (COO) of the Domestic Affairs Division from approximately 1986 to 1989. Domestic Affairs and Overseas Affairs were combined around 1994 into Program Services, and Solomon became Executive Director of Program Services. After Solomon was promoted to Chief Operating Officer for UJA-Federation, John Ruskay replaced him in this position in Program Services, with the title of Group Vice-President of Program Services.

Solomon was promoted to Chief Operating Officer and Senior Vice-President of UJA-Federation, 1996-1997. When he left UJA-Federation in 1997, Misha Galperin and John Ruskay were appointed UJA-Federation co-COOs, jointly filling the position held by Solomon.

Series 4: Overseas Affairs, 1984-2003

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Overseas Affairs

The Series is in English.
10 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by subject.

Processing Information:

A large portion (28 of 38 boxes) of Overseas Affairs boxes were lost in a warehouse fire in January 2015.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Agencies and Support-Community Services/Functional Groups/Community Development-Neighborhood Preservation, for Joseph Langer’s files in the Neighborhood Preservation department, the local New York counterpart to Project Renewal

Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Agencies and Support/Project Renewal - Lucille Strauss files

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Overseas Affairs files belong to numerous staff members in the department in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s, including Executive Directors Robert Lichtman and Mona Abramson, Overseas Executives Michael Greenberg and Naomi Cohen (whose responsibilities included evaluating and staffing overseas grant proposals), and Immigrant Services Project Coordinator Simha Rosenberg.

A significant amount of files in Overseas Affairs pertain to Ashalim, the Association for Planning and Development of Services for Children and Youth at Risk and their Families. Other major sections of the Overseas Affairs files include Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI), a committee working on education and advocacy; Partnership 2000, a venture between New York and Jerusalem focusing on immigrant absorption, Jewish identity development, quality of life programs, and connecting Jewish communities around the world; and Project Renewal, an employment and community building project in the Israeli cities of Lod, Ramla, and Hatikvah.

Historical Note:

The Overseas Affairs Division, a department unique to the New York Federation, was responsible for relations between New York UJA-Federation and its overseas beneficiaries, and acted as a bridge between the New York Jewish community, Israel, and other diaspora communities around the world. In addition to funds sent overseas through the annual campaign, the Overseas Affairs Division allocated over ten million dollars to numerous projects throughout Israel and the Former Soviet Union. The department maintained staff in New York and Jerusalem, and was supplemented by volunteers.

The Overseas Affairs Division focused on educational, employment, and outreach programming. Major projects and initiatives included Project Renewal, Partnership 2000, the Legacy Fund, the Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI) Committee, the Atid Society, and the Ashalim program.

Series 5: Fund Raising and Campaigns, 1979—1997

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns

The Series is in English.
15 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Other Departments/Fundraising and Campaigns

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

These files reflect the work of fundraising efforts carried out by the Communal Services Division, the Major Gifts department, the Trades and Professions department, and through the annual campaign.

Historical Note:

Fundraising and Campaigns is a generic name for the departments that participated in one of Federation’s main functions - raising money to support their affiliated agencies and overseas work. There were many different names over the years for these departments and divisions. During the 1970s the division was known as Community Support.

In addition to annual fundraising campaigns, Federation raised money through Communal Service Division, which targeted communities; through Major Gifts, which aimed to reach prominent donors; and through “Trades and Professions”, an extremely successful model for raising funds by industry, combined with reaching other donors by community and synagogue affiliation.

Subseries A. Annual Campaign – Paul Kane Files, 1987—1996

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns » Annual Campaign – Paul Kane Files

5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Kane’s Annual Campaign files date from 1987-1996 and reflect his work in campaign planning and events, with committees and the Board of Directors, and with other UJA-Federation departments.

Historical Note:

Paul Kane was Executive Director of Trades and Professions from 1990 to 1994, after which he was the Executive Director and Group Vice President of the Annual Campaign. Kane oversaw UJA-Federation’s general and capital campaigns, major gift giving, and planned giving. He later became Senior Vice President of the Financial Resource Division (FRD), before he was hired by the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA) in 2010.

Subseries B. Communal Service Division – Steve Klein Files, 1988-1997

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns » Communal Service Division – Steve Klein Files

1.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Steve Klein’s files reflect his work with UJA-Federation agencies and on various campaigns in the 1990s.

Historical Note:

Steve Klein was a Development Executive and Campaign Coordinator in the Communal Service Division. In this role, he planned campaigns for communities, including phone-a-thons, special appeals and mailings, high-level solicitations, and events.

Subseries C. Major Gifts, 1988—1996

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns » Major Gifts

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Major Gifts department files reflect the work of staff members engaged in fundraising efforts with high-level donors, and focus largely on events.

Historical Note:

The Major Gifts department of Fundraising and Campaigns aimed to reach high-level donors by focusing on the social nature of philanthropy and improving the donor experience. The department planned events, site visits, and opportunities for donors to meet each other in efforts to engage donors and solicit major gifts.

Subsubseries i – Jack Baer Files, 1988—1996

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns » Major Gifts » Jack Baer Files

2 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Baer’s files date from 1988 to 1996 and reflect his work in the Major Gifts Department organizing various fundraising efforts, his work with donors, and departmental operations and business.

Historical Note:

Jack Baer was Assistant Director of Trades and Professions at UJA-Federation of New York from 1990 to 1993. As Assistant Director, Baer oversaw fundraising activities for 22 trades and cultivated funder relationships that could be leveraged to support events. He supervised a team of five professional fundraisers responsible for reaching a $4.8 million yearly goal via a variety of fundraising events, and typically raised $5 million, exceeding their goal by 4% before the formal end of the campaign year. From 1993 to 2001, Baer served as Director of Financial Resources Development (FRD) Administration at UJA-Federation of New York. All of his files that survive are from his responsibilities in the Major Gifts Department.

Subsubseries ii – Libby Peppersberg, Director of Special Programs, 1989—1991

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns » Major Gifts » Libby Peppersberg, Director of Special Programs

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Peppersberg’s files date from 1989 to 1991 and reflect her work organizing donor events, including a trip to Ellis Island and various sites in and around New York City.

Historical Note:

Libby Peppersberg was Director of Special Programs in the Major Gifts department of the Fundraising & Campaigns Division from 1988-1991. She organized events for current and prospective donors. She had previously worked as an Executive Assistant to, and later Director of the Office of, the General Chairman and Campaign Director during the Joint Campaign.

Subseries D. Trades and Professions, 1979—1995

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns » Trades and Professions

5.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subsubseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Other Departments/Fundraising and Campaigns/Trades & Professions

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Trades and Professions files reflect the work of Executive Director Paul Kane and staff members Sherri Greenbach and Jean Silver. They consist of files related to work with specific trades divisions, Greenbach’s work on the Joint Women’s Task Force, and Trades and Professions departmental business.

Historical Note:

First mentioned in Federation minutes in 1917, the Trades and Professions Department was a large group of mostly board members and volunteers, supported by paid staff at Federation, who arranged events within the myriad trades and professions in which Federation donors and potential donors worked. By organizing donors by trade or profession, there was often intense competition among colleagues to make large enough donations every year to be influential within the donor’s workplace as well. By the time of the merger in 1986, major trades had changed drastically, and the department focused on lawyers, real estate, the entertainment industry, and banking and finance.

Subsubseries i – Paul Kane, Executive Director, 1979—1995

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns » Trades and Professions » Paul Kane, Executive Director

4 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Processing Information:

One of Kane’s boxes suffered water damage in off-site storage before arriving for processing; all documents in the box were photocopied and refoldered, retaining original labeling.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Kane’s Trades and Professions files date from 1979 to 1995 and reflect his fundraising work with numerous industry professionals.

Historical Note:

Paul Kane was Executive Director of Trades and Professions from 1990 to 1994, after which he was the Executive Director and Group Vice President of the Annual Campaign. Kane oversaw UJA-Federation’s general and capital campaigns, major gift giving, and planned giving. He later became Senior Vice President of the Financial Resource Division (FRD), before he was hired by the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA) in 2010.

Subsubseries ii – Sherri Greenbach Files, 1993—1995

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns » Trades and Professions » Sherri Greenbach Files

.5 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Greenbach’s files date from 1993 to 1995 and reflect her work on the Joint Women’s Task Force.

Historical Note:

Sherri Greenbach was a Development Executive of the Lawyers Division, and later the Assistant Director of Trades & Professions. She worked on fundraising and budgeting for these departments. Greenbach also participated in the Joint Women's Task Force.

Subsubseries iii – Jean Silver Files, 1988—1992

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Fund Raising and Campaigns » Trades and Professions » Jean Silver Files

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Silver’s files date from 1988 to 1992 and reflect her work in the Costume Jewelry and Hair Accessories Division and the Optical Division, including work orders, meeting files, invitations, and memos. These are the only specific files remaining.

Historical Note:

Jean Silver was a Campaign Professional in Trades and Professions in the 1990s, working in the Costume Jewelry and Hair Accessories Division and the Optical Division.

Series 6: Government Relations, 1980—2004

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Government Relations

The Series is in English.
30.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in five subseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Government and External Relations files reflect the work of Executive Director Ron Soloway, Health and Human Services Director Harvey Newman, City Policy Directors Ilene Marcus and Susan Stamler, Housing and Community Development Assistant Director Joanne Hoffman, and Director of Resource Management and Resource Development Anita Altman.

Historical Note:

The Government and External Relations Division was responsible for developing and implementing strategies that maximized government support for programs operated by UJA-Federation network agencies. Staff regularly met with elected officials, government agency staff, and policy makers on the city, state, and federal levels of government about issues that affected not only beneficiary agencies, but also the New York and broader Jewish communities. Government and External Relations staff also worked with many other advocacy organizations and service providers to advocate on behalf of seniors, children and families, and special populations, as well as on issues such as education, economic self-sufficiency, mental health, immigration, and health care69.

Footnote

Subseries A. Executive Director – Ron Soloway Files, 1985—2004

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Government Relations » Executive Director – Ron Soloway Files

14 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Soloway’s files date from 1985 to 2004 and contain work with agencies, Susan Stamler’s budget material, chronological files, work with internal committees and external government departments, and other subject files.

Historical Note:

Ronald (Ron) Soloway was Executive Director of Government Relations from 1991 to 2000. Coming from a background in policy in both the government and the nonprofit sector, Soloway oversaw major initiatives in the department, including the first year’s work of the Caring Commission, one of four UJA-Federation commissions charged with developing program priorities and allocating targeted funds.

Subseries B. Health and Human Services Executive Director – Harvey Newman Files, 1987—1996

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Government Relations » Health and Human Services Executive Director – Harvey Newman Files

3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Processing Information:

None of Newman’s files from the other departments under his purview survive as part of this collection, which is why his files have been placed here and at this level in the arrangement.

Approximately half a linear foot was received as loose documents without folders; it was processed together with his regular subject files.

Related Material:

Domestic Affairs – see Historical Note and Scope and Content Note for more information on the Health and Human Services Division

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Newman’s files date from 1987 to 1996 and contain work with agencies, work with internal committees and external government departments, and other subject files. Government files, both local and federal, can be found among these subject files.

Historical Note:

Harvey Newman was Executive Director of Health and Human Services from 1987 to 1996. During part of this time one of the departments that reported to him was Government Relations, at which time Newman was responsible for distribution of local and national funds and national, state, and city government relations.

Subseries C. City Policy, 1980—2002

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Government Relations » City Policy

9 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subsubseries.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

City Policy files contain the files of Ilene Marcus and Susan Stamler, both Directors of the department, and reflect their work with UJA-Federation agencies; with external local, state, and federal government departments; and on various human services issues.

Historical Note:

The City Policy department worked to build UJA-Federation’s relationships with New York City governmental departments and agencies, working with them to support programs for human service issues such as affordable housing, employment, and child welfare.

Subsubseries i – Ilene Marcus, Director, 1980—2000

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Government Relations » City Policy » Ilene Marcus, Director

1.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The files of Ilene Marcus relate to various New York City departments and New York City’s Human Resources Administration. Also included are files on family day care and foster care and files pertaining to contracting.

Historical Note:

Ilene S. Marcus was Director of City Policy and Public Affairs from 1988 to 1994. With a background in city government, she worked closely with New York City departments on issues such as mental health, elderly and youth services, and employment.

Subsubseries ii – Susan Stamler, Assistant Director/Director, 1984—2002

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Government Relations » City Policy » Susan Stamler, Assistant Director/Director

7.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

A significant portion of Stamler’s files reflect her work with agencies, particularly the Human Services Council of New York (HSC). A considerable number of files are devoted to child care and child welfare and the files of Administration for Children’s Services (ACS). There are also files regarding New York City mayors David N. Dinkins and Rudolph V. Giuliani, as well as Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer, Public Advocate Mark Green and Council Speaker Peter Vallone. Files of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) are also included. Stamler’s budget files from 1995 to 1999 can be found as a segment of Executive Director Ronald Soloway’s files in Subseries A.

Historical Note:

Susan Stamler was Associate Director of City Policy under Ilene Marcus from 1992 to 1994, then followed her as Director of City Policy from 1994-1999. She focused on children’s services, but also continued Marcus’ work in other areas and with various New York City government departments.

Subseries D. Housing and Community Development – Joanne Hoffman, Assistant Director, 1988—1998

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Government Relations » Housing and Community Development – Joanne Hoffman, Assistant Director

1 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical and chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

This one box contains United States Department of Housing and Urban Development 202 Applications and other documents pertaining to the Bensonhurst Housing for the Elderly and the Selfhelp Housing for the Elderly facilities.

Historical Note:

Joanne Hoffman was Assistant Director of Housing and Community Development from 1989 to 1990. In this role, she worked with the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development on issues surrounding housing for the elderly.

Subseries E. Resource Management and Resource Development – Anita Altman, Director, 1988—2004

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Government Relations » Resource Management and Resource Development – Anita Altman, Director

3.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Processing Information:

Altman’s files contained a number and letter filing system on original folder tabs that was removed, but can still be seen on some individual pages. The format was: letter, category, number, title (example: C. Foundations 107 Butler Foundation). C corresponds to Foundations, D corresponds to Issues, and E corresponds to Agencies. Other information about this filing system is unavailable.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Altman’s files date from 1988 to 2004 and reflect her work with agencies, foundations, and with Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs).

Historical Note:

Anita Altman was Director of Resource Management and Resource Development from 1990 to 2002. In this role, she worked on issues such as the AIDS epidemic, Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs), and domestic violence. Altman also founded the Task Force on Family Violence, as well as the Task Force on People with Disabilities.

Series 7: Commission on the Jewish People (COJP), 1990—2000

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Commission on the Jewish People (COJP)

The Series is in English.
5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Agencies and Support-Community Services/Functional Groups/Community Development-Neighborhood Preservation

Subgroup IV – UJA-Federation – UJF/Overseas Affairs

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Commission on the Jewish People (COJP) files belong to numerous staff members in the department in the 1990s, including Director of Partnership Programs Susan Holzman, and Overseas Executive Naomi Cohen. These files reflect programs both domestic and overseas, and have some overlap with Overseas Affairs initiatives such as Project Renewal, Partnership 2000, and the Legacy Fund.

Historical Note:

Growing out of the Community Development and Neighborhood Preservation department in Federation’s Domestic Affairs division, the Commission on the Jewish People (COJP) was formed to create a globally connected Jewish people, “striving for interconnected Jewish communities that see themselves as part of the Jewish people and acknowledge the unique role that Israel plays in their collective identity”70. COJP focused on issues such as the safety of Jewish communities abroad, the integration of Jewish immigrants in the United States and in Israel, fostering strong American-Israeli relationships, and the unity among Jews regardless of denominational, cultural, or ethnic divisions. To advance these goals, COJP coordinated three clusters which maintained their own task forces: the Integration and Absorption Cluster maintained the Task Force on Ethiopian Israelis, the Task Force on Arab Citizens of Israel, and the Task Force on Former Soviet Union Populations in Israel; the Cluster on Strengthening Jewish Collective maintained the Task Force on New York Jewry, the Task Force on Jewish Peoplehood in Israel, and the Task Force on Global Jewish Connections; and the Policy and Emerging Issues Cluster maintained the Immigration Task Force, the Loan Fund Task Force, and the Aliyah/Klitah Task Force.

Footnotes

Series 8: Marketing & Communications (formerly Public Relations), 1890s—2013 (bulk 1980—2000)

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Marketing & Communications (formerly Public Relations)

The Series is in English.
21.5 Bankers Boxes and 6 Oversize Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three subseries.

Related Material:

Subgroup I – Federation of Jewish Philanthropies – FJP/Other Departments/Public Relations

Subgroup II – United Jewish Appeal – UJA/Public Relations

Subgroup III – UJA-Federation Joint Campaign – UFJC/Public Relations

P-970, Judith A. Manelis Papers

Hadassah collection/RG13/Executive Directors/Judith Manelis

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Bulk dates range from 1986 – 2000, with some retrospective material pre-dating the 1986 merger. This series includes biographical files; advertising campaigns; visual materials and photographs; direct marketing materials; and surveys, polls, and studies.

Historical Note:

This department at both Federation and UJA, prior to the 1986 merger, was called Public Relations. Marketing and Communications promoted UJA-Federation and solicited feedback from the community. Judith A. Manelis served as the Executive Director of Marketing and Communications from 1986–1990.

Subseries A. Strategic Planning, Norma Birnbaum files, 1995—2000

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Marketing & Communications (formerly Public Relations) » Strategic Planning, Norma Birnbaum files

5.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged into chronological and subject files, then chronologically.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Norma Birnbaum’s files contain chronological and subject files, and date from 1995-2000. Major subjects include marketing priorities, a charity tracking study, and a baby boomer study. Files also include lengthy data-oriented surveys, polls, and studies with analysis and conclusions about the demographics of UJF donors.

Historical Note:

Strategic Planning was a new department in UJA-Federation’s Marketing and Communications (formerly Public Relations) division, launched in 1991 to evaluate areas of operation in UJA-Federation and identify new and more modern directions for fundraising, community planning, and the promotion of Jewish continuity. Norma Birnbaum served as Director of Strategic Planning in the 1990s.

Subseries B. Subject Files, 1953—2000

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Marketing & Communications (formerly Public Relations) » Subject Files

3.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged chronologically by decade (1980s and 1990s), then alphabetically.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Subject files consist of Annual Reports 1986-1998; biographical files; advertising campaigns; visual materials, such as pamphlets; direct marketing materials including mailing solicitations, telephone solicitations, and telethons; and other printed materials.

Historical Note:

As in the Public Relations department of Federation, Subject Files contain printed material from UJA-Federation and document its history.

Subseries C. Photos, 1890s—2013 (bulk 1980—1999)

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Marketing & Communications (formerly Public Relations) » Photos

12.5 Bankers Boxes and 6 Oversize Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in four subsubseries: Portraits, Chronological, Subjects, and Legacy Photographs.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Dates of photographs range from the 1910s – 2000. There are approximately 9,500 mostly black & white 8 x 10” prints; some slides, negatives, and prints of other sizes are included as well. Themes include: early days of Federation and UJA; Israel and overseas missions; agencies; trade divisions; special events; parties; fundraising and campaign activities; UJF leaders, politicians, and celebrities.

Historical Note:

The photographs stored and created by the Marketing and Communications Department document UJA-Federation’s work, including special events; parties; fundraising activities, agencies and camps; children; the elderly; leaders, politicians, and celebrities.

Subsubseries i – Portraits

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Marketing & Communications (formerly Public Relations) » Photos » Portraits

Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Portraits date from the 1930s through the 1990s. Names of portrait subjects are listed individually here. A group of portraits of UJA-Federation female presidents is included within the Portraits subseries.

Historical Note:

Portraits were taken at Federation events throughout the years of donors, high profile event attendees, and some staff members. These photographs were kept by the Marketing and Communications department.

Subsubseries ii – Chronological

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Marketing & Communications (formerly Public Relations) » Photos » Chronological

Arrangement:

Chronological.

Subsubseries iii – Subjects

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Marketing & Communications (formerly Public Relations) » Photos » Subjects

Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Subsubseries iv – Legacy Photographs

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Marketing & Communications (formerly Public Relations) » Photos » Legacy Photographs

Arrangement:

Retained in the same order in which they were received from the Marketing and Communications department.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Legacy photographs are largely undated, but approximate dates range from the 1920s through the 1990s. The photographs reflect different aspects of UJA-Federation’s work, including agency sites, work in Israel, and UJA-Federation staff members and events.

Historical Note:

This series of older photographs was kept for many years in the UJA-Federation’s Marketing and Communications department. While not originally part of the archives project, these photographs are now available digitally through a link to all 351 Legacy photographs in the container list.

Series 9: Audiovisual Materials, 1982—2007 (bulk 1982—2000)

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Audiovisual Materials

The Series is in English.
3 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in five subseries; each subseries is a different audiovisual format.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The audiovisual materials contain an audio reel, audio cassettes, diskettes, microfilm, and video recordings, and date from 1982-2007. These various formats document Communal Planning Committee, Strategic Planning Committee, Domestic Affairs division, and other departmental meetings; conferences held by the Commission on Synagogue Relations and other departments; public relations material; budgeting and finance material; donor relations material; and other material related to the operations of UJA-Federation. Older audio cassettes, from prior to the UJA-Federation merger, were stored with later, post-merger audio cassettes; this arrangement was retained during processing which is why some audio cassettes are dated 1982.

Many of these audiovisual materials have been digitized and are accessible with links directly from the container list.

Historical Note:

The audiovisual materials document various conferences, events and meetings at UJA-Federation, and also contain items pertaining to daily operations such as budgeting, donor relations, and reports.

Subseries A. Audio Reels

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Audiovisual Materials » Audio Reels

1 audio reel.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Audio Reel documents the Communal Planning Committee meeting in October 1987, and includes the opening of an exhibition by photographer Roman Vishniac.

Historical Note:

The Audio Reels are audio recordings in reel-to-reel form that document meetings and events. In the 1970s Audio Cassettes began to replace the Audio Reel format.

Subseries B. Audio Cassettes

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Audiovisual Materials » Audio Cassettes

1.5 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The audio recordings on cassette tape document various conferences held by the Commission on Synagogue Relations 1982-1993, meetings of various departments in the Domestic Affairs division 1988-1991, Stephen Solender’s telephone calls with Allya Zonis in November 1987, and various other meetings.

Historical Note:

The Audio Cassette format replaced Audio Reels in the 1970s.

Subseries C. Diskettes

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Audiovisual Materials » Diskettes

.5 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Diskettes document meetings, budget forms, public relations material, reports, and other UJA-Federation material from the mid-1980s through the late 1990s. Most content on diskettes is likely draft material and likely exists in hard copy.

Historical Note:

Diskettes were used for data storage from the 1970s through the early 2000s, and appear in various formats including 8”, 7”, 5 ¼”, and 3½”.

Subseries D. Microfilm

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Audiovisual Materials » Microfilm

.5 Bankers Box.
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Board of Directors minutes are available in digitized form (from the microfilm), 1988-1992.

Historical Note:

The official edited versions of the Board of Directors minutes were bound by UJA-Federation, and the bound copies were microfilmed purely as a back-up in case of a disaster. The microfilm was digitized and these minutes are accessible through links in the container list.

Subseries E. Video

You are here: UJA-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (UJF) » Audiovisual Materials » Video

.5 Bankers Box
Arrangement:

Chronological.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The video recordings document speakers at various conferences and events held by UJA-Federation, as well as public relations material. Video recordings date from 1991-2007.

Historical Note:

Video formats replaced 16mm film in the 1970s and 1980s.

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Subgroup V. Oral History Project, undated, 1943, 1955, 1962, 1965—2004 (bulk 1981—2004)

You are here: Oral History Project

The Subgroup is in English.
24 Bankers Boxes.
Arrangement:

Arranged in three series.

Series 1: Administration is arranged into two Subseries.

  • Subseries A: Subject Files contains information on the background of the project, affiliations with related oral history programs at other organizations including the sharing of interviews and transcripts, selection and training of interviewers, selection of interviewees and releases from both the interviewers and the interviewees. This Subseries is arranged alphabetically by subject.
  • Subseries B: Work Files contains the administrative files for each of the interviewees - correspondence, edited and unedited transcripts, and some restriction information. Some Work Files exist where interviews were planned but never occurred. This Subseries is arranged alphabetically by last name of interviewee.

Series 2: Transcripts are the edited paper copies of the interviews. Housed with most of the transcripts are photographs of the interviewees as well as the release with permission to make available, and in some cases back-up documentation to enhance the information contained within the transcript. All of the transcripts have been digitized and are accessible directly from the finding aid. This Series is arranged alphabetically by last name of interviewee.

Series 3: Audio-Visual and other formats have all been digitized and are accessible directly from the finding aid where permission has been granted. The original formats are arranged into two subseries.

  • Subseries A: Microfiche contains microfiche of most of the interviews considered "open" in 2001, and is retained off-site as a preservation format (not for access) only.
  • Subseries B: Audio Cassettes contains the original audio cassette sound recordings of the interviews, which are retained as a preservation format (not for access) only.

This Series is arranged alphabetically by last name of interviewee.

Processing Information:

A set of the UJA-Federation oral history transcripts and cassette tapes considered "open" in 2004 were transferred at that time to the American Jewish Historical Society (AJHS). In 2011 the remaining oral history materials were transferred to AJHS as part of the larger transfer of UJA-Federation of New York archival materials; these two oral history collections have been integrated and the results of this integration and the digitization from 2011-2012 described in the Scope and Content note are reflected in the description here of this series.

The goal was to make as many interviews as possible available digitally, in the hope that these valuable stories would reach a wider audience, both scholarly and general interest, as well as family historians. All sound recordings and transcripts have been digitized for preservation purposes; only those with release restrictions are available online. Other interviews may be read in person at the Center for Jewish History.

Related Material:

The topics covered in the Oral History Project subgroup relate to many of the collections held at the American Jewish Historical Society, including institutional records, personal papers and published materials held in the library. Any topic or name of interest can be searched at search.cjh.org to find related holdings at the Center for Jewish History.

Scope and Content:

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

The Oral History Project series includes the sound recordings and typed transcripts of the interviews conducted as part of the Oral History Project. For both preservation and access reasons, both the sound recordings and transcripts have been digitized during the processing of this collection. When allowed by copyright, the digital version is accessible by clicking through from the container list; if only the paper transcript is available because of access restrictions, that is indicated in the finding aid as well. There are 262 oral histories accessible online.

A typical interview transcript includes the date(s) of the interview, the names of both interviewee and interviewer, the authority under which the project was implemented (the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies or the American Jewish Congress, for example), a photograph of the interviewee and a signed release form. The interview generally includes a chronological narrative prompted by interviewer's questions, from early life and family through relevant connections to an affiliated institution, to the current activities of an interviewee. The topics covered by the interviews include a wide range of events and experiences, from pre-World War I schools in New York and the deprivations of the Great Depression to activities during World War II, the post-war flourishing of Jewish communal organizations in New York, and the Soviet Jewish immigration to the United States and Israel in the 1980s and 1990s.

Also included in the series are the administrative files for the project, separated into two Sub-Subseries: Subject Files, the administrative files for the project office including the files of Nicki Tanner, chair of the project; and Work Files, one for each interviewee as well as for people where interviews were planned but did not ultimately take place. The Subject files include information on the origins of the program, the search for and training of interviewers, the search for the right people to interview and the cumulative, published catalogs. An enormous amount of time and energy was spent on the pursuit of signed releases, preferably without restrictions, and edited transcripts, and this is reflected in the Subject files. Work files differ by interviewee, but may contain correspondence, first drafts of transcripts, edited transcripts and signed releases.

Included among the interviews are those from affiliated oral history collections, where transcripts were shared. In addition to the transcripts, this shared material may contain cassette tapes of interviews conducted by these outside organizations. Access to this material has been determined according to the specific interview restrictions and the existence of signed release forms. Please note the following:

American Jewish Committee (AJC) interviews in the collection are in all cases in addition to UJA-Federation interviews of the same leaders; the AJC transcripts have been retained in the paper files but are not available digitally. The full AJC oral history collection was transferred in 1990 to the New York Public Library, and should be available through www.nypl.org. The 11 AJC interviewees are: Nathan C. Belth, Irma Bloomingdale, Elinor Guggenheimer, Dr. Maurice B. Hexter, Joseph Hofheimer, Joan L. Jacobson, Frederick P. Rose, Theodore H. Silbert, Judge Caroline K. Simon, Dr. John Slawson and Laurence A. Tisch.

NYANA interviews for Geoffrey Chin, Pauline Falk, Sylvia Friedman and Gary Zucker.

Historical Note:

UJA-Federation of New York's Oral History Project was started in 1981 by Nicki Tanner, chair of the Oral History Project at the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York. Upon the merger in 1986 of Federation with UJA, the project was continued under the auspices of UJA-Federation of New York. The project was modeled on the oral history programs at other organizations, and in consultation with the William E. Wiener Oral History Library at the American Jewish Committee. It eventually grew to include over 260 oral histories, many shared with the oral history programs of other Jewish organizations because of overlapping histories, donors and leaders, and to encourage wider access to these materials. Affiliations in addition to the American Jewish Committee include the oral history programs at the Jewish Museum, the 92nd Street Y and the New York Association for New Americans (NYANA).

The purpose of the project was "to record the history of this organization through taped memoirs of volunteer and professional leaders whose lives influenced and were influenced by UJA-Federation."71 The project documented the American Jewish experience in the field of Jewish communal work in general and, in particular, gave an historical perspective on the activities of UJA-Federation and its agencies in the United States and in Israel.

Many of those interviewed were involved in the work of more than one of these agencies, or in other Jewish organizations in New York, creating a complex web of leadership throughout the organized New York Jewish community. The interviews describe activities, events, attitudes, motivation and emotional involvement in Jewish communal life over most of the 20th century.

The tapes were transcribed verbatim in typewritten form, and the transcripts were sent for review to the interviewees. The approved copy was kept as an official transcript of the Oral History Project and was made available (upon certain conditions) for researchers and the general public.

Volunteer leadership and professional staff were recruited and interviewed, some repeatedly, until their stories were captured completely. Interviews were generally conducted after the participant’s active involvement had ended, when perspective on their contributions would have been possible. Interviewers were hand-picked and carefully trained to master the technical issues of recording an oral history, and to learn how to competently plan and direct an interview. As Nicki Tanner, the chair of the Oral History Project, worded it in her correspondence, she sought interviewers who could be "active listeners". Interviews were edited and rights authorizations and releases were carefully sought and tracked.

Updated catalogs were published regularly through 2001. The Oral History Project was active until 2004.

Footnote

Restrictions:


Access Restrictions: Because of the size of the collection and of the finding aid, the actual box and folder lists are in a separate Container List, linked to this finding aid here and at the start of each Scope and Content Note at every level where folders exist.

The complete folder list for the entire collection is found in this downloadable Excel file.

Nicki Newman Tanner, the Chairman of the Oral History Project, worked diligently with interviewers and interviewees to create an edited transcript from a recorded oral history and then acquire a written release for the edited transcript from the participants. Permission and access to the digitized version of the oral histories and transcripts is based on Tanner's ability to coordinate the editing of the transcript of the oral histories and acquire the release from the participants.

The vast majority of the digitized audio recordings and transcripts are available online; it is strongly recommended that researchers utilize the digitized oral histories (audio and transcript formats), eliminating the need to look at the physical copies.

As with any of the American Jewish Historical Society's archival material, users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. However, in some cases, limitations on access to the digitized versions of a few specific oral histories or transcripts are more stringent and users should pay special attention to these restrictions when seeking permission to cite or publish excerpts of the interviews. Moreover, where there is no audio recording available or the recording is restricted, users are invited to view the transcript in the Reading Room of the Center for Jewish History.

The collection is open to all researchers by permission of the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society, except items that are restricted due to their fragility.

Use Restrictions: Information concerning the literary rights may be obtained from the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society. Users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. For more information contact:
American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: reference@ajhs.org

Series 1: Administration, 1980-2004

You are here: Oral History Project » Administration

The Series is in English.
Arrangement:

Arranged in two subseries. See Subgroup Arrangement Note.

Scope and Content:

See Subgroup Scope and Content Note.

Subseries A: Subject Files, undated, 1970-2004

Boxes 1-2.

Work Files, Transcripts and Audiovisual Formats

You are here: Oral History Project » Work Files, Transcripts and Audiovisual Formats

Arrangement:

  • Series 1: Administration/Subseries B: Work Files, undated, 1943, 1955, 1962, 1965-1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1980-2004
  • Series 2: Transcripts, 1977-1978, 1981-2004
  • Series 3: Audiovisual Formats, 1981-2004

Scope and Content:

Details for these Series and Subseries are combined in the Container List in this downloadable Excel file in order to simplify access to the digitized materials. The barcode number on the right indicates the location of folders in the Work Files, Series 1 - Subseries B. Specific dates on the right indicate the various dates of the interviews. Where the date appears as a year only, or a range of years (with no month or day), it is an indication that no interview took place, or an interview did not proceed to a completed transcript, and only the Work File exists. Where no paper file exists, for Eva Levy Marshall and Doris Roberts, there is no barcode number.

While most digitized oral histories have both audio files and a transcript available for research, several digitized oral histories have only audio files or a transcript available.

If a name listed in the Container List has no hyperlink to its right, there is either no surviving audio of the oral history interview, or the digital files are not currently available to researchers for reasons of copyright. For information pertaining to these oral history interviews, please contact the American Jewish Historical Society at reference@ajhs.org.

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