Guide to the Papers of Emil Schorsch (1899-1982), 1841-1999 (bulk 1927-1940)
 
AR 25103 / MF 721

Processed by Michael Simonson

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: http://www.lbi.org/ask

URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2006  Leo Baeck Institute
Finding aid was encoded by Lea Osborne on June 21, 2006. Description is in English.
August 2008: Collection number corrected and microfilm number added. 2010-12-17:  encoding of linking to digital objects from finding aid was changed from <extref> to <dao> through dao_conv.xsl

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Schorsch, Emil, 1899-1982
Title: Emil Schorsch Collection
Dates: 1841-1999
Dates: bulk 1927-1940
Abstract: Emil Schorsch was a rabbi in Hanover, Germany, from 1927 through 1938. He immigrated first to England and then the United States, where he served as a rabbi in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, from 1940 until 1964. Throughout his career he was a strong proponent of conservative Judaism. The collection documents both his personal and professional life. The records consist of his writings, including sermons, lectures, and speeches. Also included is an extensive amount of correspondence, as well as material documenting the fate of the Jewish community in Hanover.
Languages: The collection is in German, English, and Hebrew.
Quantity: 5.25 linear feet
Identification: AR 25103
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute
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Biographical Note

Emil Schorsch was a rabbi in both Germany and, later, the United States. Throughout his rabbinical career he was a strong proponent of conservative Judaism.

He was born in Hüngheim (Baden) in 1899. After attending a teachers' seminar in Esslingen he began his studies at the Jüdisch-Theologisches Seminar in Breslau in 1923. In 1926 he married Fanny Rothschild from Esslingen, in Württemberg. He graduated from the seminary in 1928. In 1927, a year before graduation, he accepted a position as Ortsrabbiner in Hanover, with the special responsibility of developing programming for Jewish youth. In 1931 he became president of the Zion-Loge Hanover, the local branch of the B'nai B'rith. He was also a member of the Allgemeiner Deutscher Rabbiner-Verband.

In the summer of 1933 Emil Schorsch was sent by the Jewish community to Palestine to learn how to prepare Jewish youth for immigration from Germany. Upon his return to Germany he began to train Jews for immigration to Palestine, in addition to fulfilling his rabbinical duties in Hanover.

Among Emil Schorsch's accomplishments in Hanover were the organization of religious youth educational programs, having Hebrew recognized as compulsory for receiving a high school diploma (Abitur), and the establishment of a Lehrhaus that existed for ten years. In addition, Emil Schorsch established a Jugendheim (youth center) for the community. He also worked at cultivating both the choir and the library of the congregation.

During Kristallnacht of November 1938 the synagogue was destroyed. Emil Schorsch was imprisoned in Buchenwald concentration camp for ten days along with other leading members of the Jewish community. He subsequently immigrated to England in December 1938, along with his wife, Fanny, and their two children, after receiving a permit from the Chief Rabbi of Great Britain, Rabbi Hertz. They moved to the United States in March 1940.

Emil Schorsch served as a rabbi in Pottstown, Pennsylvania from 1940 until 1964, as well as a military chaplain in the Pottstown area throughout the Second World War. In 1963, he returned to Germany and gave a speech at the opening of the new Hanover synagogue. He died in Vineland, New Jersey in 1982. His son, the historian Ismar Schorsch, served as the sixth Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York and as the President of the Leo Baeck Institute.

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Scope and Contents

The papers of Emil Schorsch document both his personal life as well as his career as a rabbi in both Germany and the United States. Included in the collection are personal documents, correspondence of both professional and personal nature, sermons, articles, and essays by Emil Schorsch, and clippings, diaries, albums, and published works by others, which he collected and saved. Sermons and lectures chronicle his commitment in educating the Jewish community in both the teachings of conservative Judaism, Jewish history, and in preparing for immigration. In particular, his writings show a deep concern for the lives of Jewish youth in Germany at that time. Personal documents include immigration papers regarding his move from Germany to England, and then the United States. A large section of correspondence with his father-in-law's family illustrates a close familial bond, and the tragedy of his in-laws not being allowed to leave Germany and subsequently perishing in the Holocaust.

Series I contains documents reflecting the career of Emil Schorsch, as well as his personal family life. Education-related papers, financial and medical documents, autobiographical writings, and records relating to the Schorsch families' immigration to England and the United States can be found in this series.

Correspondence is contained in Series II and is divided into two subseries: Professional and Personal. Most of the records are arranged chronologically, however, those sections in which Schorsch organized topically have been preserved in their original order. Professional correspondence has been further divided into three sections, Section A includes early letters from the 1930s, Section B hold correpondence between Schorsch and certain Jewish organizations, and Section C consists of correspondence that Schorsch kept separately that concerned a Rabbinical conference and a community of exiled German Jewish Rabbis. Personal Correspondence is divided into two sections. Section A is arranged alphabetically, while Section B relates directly to the Schorsch family's immigration to first England and then the United States.

Writings comprise the bulk of the Emil Schorsch Collection. Subseries 1 contains notebooks that date from Emil Schorsch's days as a student at the University of Tübingen and the Jewish Theological Seminary in Breslau.

Subseries 2 holds general sermons, sermons presented at special occasions such as circumcisions, Bar Mitzvahs, and weddings, and eulogies.

Subseries 3 documents Emil Schorsch's work in educating his congregation in Hanover through lectures on the topics of Jewish religious life, culture, and history.

The speeches that make up Subseries 4 are largely dedicated to the youth community of the synagogue. However, speeches to other age groups and populations are also present.

Most of the material in Subseries 5 appears to be articles and manuscripts, but it is possible they were also used as lectures, speeches, sermons, and drafts for books. Many of the items appear to have been published. In some cases the published version appears in the folder either alone or with the draft.

The items in Subseries 6 are mostly extracts from various books discussing religion and spirituality, apparently copied by Emil Schorsch on a typewriter for research purposes.

Series IV chronicles the history of the Jewish community of Hanover both before, during, and after the time Emil Schorsch served as rabbi in the community. Included are detailed listings of Jews deported by the Nazis from Hanover. The series also contains articles that were written in response to the dedication of the new synagogue in Hanover in 1963, the text of the inauguration speech by Emil Schorsch, and other published information about the dedication.

Series V contains clippings from various newspapers collected by Emil Schorsch. The articles are many and cover a wide variety of subjects, including but not limited to topics that occur in other areas of the collection.

The last series, Series VI, consists of other material collected by Emil Schorsch that did not subscribe to the definitions of the other series.

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Arrangement

This collection is arranged in six series.

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

Open to researchers.

Access Information

Collection is digitized. Follow the links in the Container List to access the digitized materials.

Collection is microfilmed - MF 721.

Readers may access the collection by visiting the Lillian Goldman Reading Room at the Center for Jewish History. We recommend reserving the collection in advance; please visit the LBI Online Catalog and click on the "Request" button.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact:
Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

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Separated Material

A number of German Jewish periodicals from the 1930s, including issues of the Nachrichtenblatt for the Jewish community of Hanover and seven issues of the Mitteilungen des Allgemeinen Deutschen Rabbiner-Verbandes from 1931 to 1933, have been removed to the Leo Baeck Institute library. Also removed to the library are two synagogue bulletins, the Adath Jeshrun and the Agudas Jeshorim, both communities in New York. Finally, a number of offprints and a pamphlet have been removed. These include Grundlagen und Ziele jüdischer Pädagogik by I. Knoller (undated), Die Neueren Strömungen in der Psychologie by Erich Stern (1930), Das Erste Buch der Tora Genesis by B. Jacob (1934), and Likutei Sichos, a weekly publication of Vaad L'Hafotzas Sichos (1971).

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Microfilm

This collection has eleven microfilm reels (MF 721).

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Emil Schorsch Collection ; AR 25103; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute.

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Container List

Follow the links to access the digitized materials.

 

Series I: Personal Documents, 1917-1963

This series is in German, English and Hebrew.
0.25 linear feet
Arrangement:

Chronologically

Scope and Content:

Series I contains documents reflecting the career of Emil Schorsch, as well as his personal family life. Education-related papers, financial and medical documents, autobiographical writings, autobiographical writings, and documents relating to the Schorsch families' immigration to England and the United States can be found in this series.

The manuscript "Memoirs of My Life" is a rough outline, arranged chronologically, that can serve as a helpful introduction to Emil Schorsch's career, including religious and ethical concerns and beliefs. A diary written by Emil Schorsch in 1917 and 1918 is also available. This diary contains descriptions of daily experiences while serving in the First World War, recording military life in the barracks and also incidents of anti-Semitism among the soldiers. Much of the diary is difficult to read, however, and there are only a few entries. The items found in the file for the insurance company Barmenia can be of value to researchers interested in National Socialist medicine and its ideas of race, as mixed with personal insurance statements are various magazines published by the insurance company spanning the period 1931-1938, in which issues of "German race," "inferior races," and the "Aryan birthrate" are often addressed within the diagram of public health.

Box Folder Title Date
1 1 "Memoirs of My Life" undated
1 2 Diary 1917-1918
1 3 Album 1917-1921
1 4 Military Records 1917-1934
1 5 Academic Certificates 1919-1924
1 6 Song (50th birthday party) 1929 January 22
1 7 Employment Records 1927-1938
1 8 Apartment Leases 1927-1938
1 9 Health Insurance Records 1931-1938
1 10 Arbeitbuch 1935
1 11 Diaries 1934-1936
1 12 Bankbook and Financial Notes 1934-1938
1 13 Letter Honoring Emil Schorsch on 10th Anniversary as Rabbi (Hanover) 1937
1 14 Identification Cards and Passports 1938
1 15 Immigration Documents 1938-1939
1 16 Certificate of Fanny Schorsch (massage program) 1939
1 17 Masterman-Smith English Institute (diploma) 1939
1 18 Report Cards of Schorsch Children 1939-1943
1 19 Birthday Poem for Fanny Schorsch 1940 July 4
1 20 Cake Recipe 1940?
1 21 Theodore Rothschild's Application for Affidavit 1941
1 22 Card from Bertel Hamburger 1941?
1 23 Military Records (United States) 1942-1944
1 24 Business Cards (New York) 1942?
1 25 Medical Treatments and Prescriptions 1938-1943
1 26 Receipt (United States Lines) 1945
1 27 Letter from Hanover Jewish Community 1963
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Series II: Correspondence, 1927-1980

This series is in German, English, and Hebrew.
0.75 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetically and Chronologically

Scope and Content:

Correspondence is contained in Series II and is divided into two subseries: Professional and Personal. Most of the records are arranged chronologically, however, those sections in which Schorsch organized topically have been preserved in their original order.

Subseries 1: Professional Correspondence, 1928-1964

This subseries is in German and English.
Scope and Content:

This subseries contains the professional correspondence of Emil Schorsch. The bulk of the material dates from his years serving as a rabbi in the city of Hanover. The correspondence documents his rabbinical role in the Hanover, and in particular his work with Jewish youth. The letters shed light on his belief in both Conservative Judaism and on his strong Zionist leanings. They also allude to and record discussions with other Jewish theologians about topics of Jewish ritual, history, and law. The letters can be particularly interesting in light that the bulk of correspondence was written in Germany in the 1930s, as Jews faced growing discrimination.

The professional correspondence is divided into three sections. Section A is arranged alphabetically from A-Z. The bulk of this correspondence is from the 1930s, and is in regards to the Jugendgemeinde founded by Emil Schorsch in Hanover. Other correspondence from this time documents Emil Schorsch's beliefs in Conservative Judaism and Zionism, and show concern about the growing Nazi persecution. A 1937 letter from Dr. Kober discusses the Nazi threat to close the seminary of Breslau. In another letter from the same year to Rabbi Hahn, Emil Schorsch expresses his strong dissatisfaction with liberal Judaism in Germany. Other individuals represented in Section A include Max Meyer, Dr. Schleisner, and Richard Weil. A 1938 letter from Leo Baeck welcomes Emil Schorsch back to his position as rabbi in Hanover upon his release from Buchenwald following the Reichsprogrom.

Section B contains correspondence with several organizations that Emil Schorsch kept separate from the alphabetical correspondence. Correspondence with the Allgemeiner Rabbinerverband in Deutschland includes letters with various rabbis in the organization, lecture schedules, meeting minutes, etc. Much of the material focuses on educating Jews in their religious faith. There is also some discussion of how much rabbis should be involved in community organizations.

The correspondence with the Vorstand der Synagogen-Gemeinde provides a valuable resource for tracking the history of the conservative Jewish community in Hanover through this period. Detailed correspondence focuses on the running of the official community, education programs, the development of the Hanover Jugendgemeinde, various personal events in the lives of community members, and documents responses to the increasing amount of anti-Semitic activity taking place.

Correspondence with the Reichsvertretung der Juden contains bibliographies that were to be used by educators in teaching Jewish history to their students (1936-1937).

Also included is correspondence with the Hanover Jewish community between 1955 and 1964, which revolves around the construction of a new synagogue to replace the one destroyed in the Reichspogrom of 1938, Emil Schorsch's return to Hanover for the dedication of the new synagogue, and the inaugural address he presented while at the event.

Section C contains correspondence Emil Schorsch kept separately that focuses on two topics: a rabbinical conference held in Hanover in 1937, and the community of German-Jewish rabbis exiled in England.

A) Alphabetical Correspondence

Box Folder Title Date
1 28 A through B 1938-1942
1 29 C through D 1939-1943
1 30 E 1943
1 31 G 1937-1980
1 32 H through K 1932-1943
1 33 L 1936-1980
1 34 M 1931-1940
1 35 N 1936-1942
1 36 O 1940
1 37 P 1938-1942
1 38 R 1928-1942
1 39 S 1932-1964
1 40 T 1934-1942
1 41 U 1941-1943
1 42 V through Z 1938-1949

B) Organizational Correspondence

Box Folder Title Date
1 43 Allgemeiner Rabbinerverband in Deutschland 1927-1936
1 44 Chief Rabbi's Religious Emergency Council 1939-1940
1 45 Jewish Community of Hanover 1955-1964
1 46 Reichsvertretung der Juden 1936-1937
1 47 Vorstand der Synagogen-Gemeinde 1926-1933
1 48 Vorstand der Synagogen-Gemeinde 1933-1938

C) Topical Correspondence

Box Folder Title Date
1 49 Rabbinical Conference in Hanover 1937
1 50 German Jewish Rabbis Exiled in England 1940

Subseries 2: Personal Correspondence, 1927-1980

This subseries is in German and English.
Scope and Content:

The personal correspondence is divided into two sections. Section A is arranged alphabetically, while section B material relates directly to the Schorsch family's immigration to England and then the United States.

The bulk of the personal correspondence in Section A, like the professional correspondence, is from Emil Schorsch's time as a rabbi in Hanover. The time period is similar to subseries I, and many of the concerns are the same, only expressed on a more personal level, between close friends and acquaintances. Many of these individuals were rabbis and religious thinkers and writers. Along with daily concerns, issues of theology and religious practice are discussed. There are also various letters from members of the congregations Emil Schorsch officiated in as a rabbi, mostly in Hanover. Other letters are from people Emil Schorsch met who became friends during the family's immmigration process to England and the United States. Much of the correspondence with fellow Jews from Germany continues after all the individuals have emigrated, and often they discuss their living situations in the new countries.

There is a separate folder of correspondence between Emil Schorsch and his father-in-law, Theodore Rothschild. Written from 1938-1941 the letters cover family matters, the prospect of emigration for Theodore Rothschild and his family, his dedication as director of a Jewish orphanage, and attempts by the family to obtain proper emigration papers to escape. Theodore Rothschild and his wife were eventually deported to Theresienstadt, where he perished. His wife survived. Two articles at the end of the folder detail Theodore Rothschild's life; a prominent member of the Jewish community in Esslingen, he was very devoted to the Jewish orphanage there.

A) Alphabetical Correspondence

Box Folder Title Date
1 51 A (including Anonymous) 1939-1940
1 52 B 1928-1943
1 53 C 1929-1942
1 54 D 1940-1941
1 55 E 1929-1941
1 56 F 1929-1962
1 57 G 1930-1944
1 58 H 1933-1943
1 59 I through J 1929-1940
1 60 K 1928-1943
1 61 L 1928-1943
1 62 M through N 1928-1942
1 63 O 1939-1940
1 64 P 1929-1943
1 65 R 1928-1943
1 66 Rothschild, Theodore 1938-1941 and 1981
1 67 S 1927-1980
1 68 T 1928-1944
1 69 U through V 1939-1940
1 70 W 1929-1943

B) Topical Correspondence

Box Folder Title Date
1 71 Emigration (United States) 1938-1940
1 72 Shipment of Family Belongings 1938-1940
1 73 Immigration Aid undated and 1939
1 74 Rabbinical Employment 1940
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Series III: Writings, 1917-1970

This series is in German and English.
3 linear feet
Arrangement:

Chronologically and Alphabetically

Scope and Content:

Writings comprise the bulk of the Emil Schorsch Collection. The series is divided into six subseries. The first three subseries are arranged chronologically, while the fourth, fifth, and sixth subseries is arranged alphabetically.

Subseries 1: Academic Notebooks, 1924-1929

This subseries is in German and English.
Scope and Content:

The notebooks that make up this section date from Emil Schorsch's days as a student at the University of Tübingen and the Jewish Theological Seminary in Breslau. Topics include Jewish studies, rabbinical studies, and research information for Schorsch's dissertation.

Box Folder Title Date
2 1 University of Tübingen 1924-1925
2 2 University of Tübingen 1924-1926
2 3 University of Tübingen? undated
2 4 University of Tübingen? undated
2 5 Thoughts on Jewish Religion undated
2 6 Courses on Jewish Studies undated
2 7 Rabbinical Study Courses 1922
2 8 Rabbinical Studies 1925-1926
2 9 Die Lehrbarkeit der Religion (dissertation material) 1929

Subseries 2: Sermons, 1917-1963

This subseries is in German and English.
Scope and Content:

This subseries is divided into three sections. Section A contains general sermons, B holds sermons presented at special occasions such as circumcisions, Bar Mitzvahs, and weddings, and Section C consists of eulogies.

Section A contains sermons Emil Schorsch presented as a rabbinical student and as a rabbi from 1925 to 1938. As a conservative rabbi, he expressed in his sermons the importance of traditional Jewish scholarship and Jewish ritual within community settings, as well as personal mysticism and piety. Many of the sermons examine the lapse in religious practices, and the need to return to God. As a rabbi dedicated to the youth of the congregation, many of the sermons are directed towards cultivating the spirituality of this part of the community. Various sermons are directly addressed to the Jugendheim founded by Emil Schorsch in Hanover. Some of the sermons illuminate his Zionist leanings.

The sermons are handwritten in notebooks until into 1927, when they begin to be typed. There are no sermons in the series from 1936-1937.

Two works of note include a sermon entitled "The Meaning of Suffering," presented in Hanover by Emil Schorsch upon his return there in 1963 to inaugurate the new synagogue, and a sermon from 1917 that does not appear to have been written or presented by Emil Schorsch. This sermon is marked-up with his reflective notes, written in the margins of the manuscript.

Section B contains sermons that were given within the Hanover Jewish community to individuals celebrating the various ceremonies indicated on each folder.

The sermons in Section C were given at the funerals of members of the Jewish community in Hanover.

A) General Sermons

Box Folder Title Date
2 10 Sermon on the Book of Ruth 1917
2 11 Sermons 1925
2 12 Sermons 1925
2 13 Sermons 1927
2 14 Sermons 1928
2 15 Sermons 1929
2 16 Sermons 1930
2 17 Sermons 1931
2 18 Sermons 1932
2 19 Sermons 1933
Box Folder Title Date
3 1 Sermons 1934 Jan.-Sept.
3 2 Sermons 1934 Oct.-Dec.
3 3 Sermons 1935 Jan.-July
3 4 Sermons 1935 Sept.-Dec.
3 5 Sermons 1938 Jan.-Aug.
3 6 Sermons 1938 Sept.-Nov.
3 7 "The Meaning of Suffering" 1963

B) Special Occasions

Box Folder Title Date
3 8 Circumcisions 1936
3 9 Bar Mitzvahs undated, 1927-1936
3 10 Weddings 1927-1937

C) Eulogies

Box Folder Title Date
3 11 Eulogies undated
3 12 Eulogies 1927
3 13 Eulogies 1928
3 14 Eulogies 1930-1933
3 15 Eulogies 1934
3 16 Eulogies 1935
3 17 Eulogies 1936
3 18 Eulogies 1937
3 19 Eulogy for Alfred Spier (published) 1937
3 20 Eulogies 1938

Subseries 3: Lectures, 1923-1937

This subseries is in German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 3 documents Emil Schorsch's work in educating his congregation in Hanover in the topics of Jewish religious life, culture, and history. His lectures reflect his own beliefs in conservative Judaism, Zionism, and his particular interests in Jewish youth. Indeed, many of the lectures are aimed specifically at members of the Jugendheim he created in Hanover. His lectures at meetings of the Jewish youth in Hanover, addressed such particular issues as the need for Jewish education, for a strong Zionist conviction, and preparation for possible emigration. He stresses the need for Jewish youth to have physically strong bodies as repositories for healthy Jewish spirits. Physical exercise is promoted as a way to create strong bonds within the Jewish youth community. Among the lectures are a number of form letters to Jewish parents, alerting them that they need to enroll their children in Jewish education programs.

The lectures are arranged in chronological order. They have been divided into three sections: Section A holds lecture series, Section B contains individual lectures, and Section C consists of notes on lectures. Some of the lectures might also have been delivered as sermons, but Emil Schorsch kept them with the other lectures. In cases where the lectures were published in newspapers, the published version has been placed in the folder with the draft.

A) Lecture Series

Box Folder Title Date
4 1 Sind die Berichte der Bibel geschichtlich? 1930-1931
4 2 Untitled 1934
4 3 Untitled 1935

B) Individual Lectures

Box Folder Title Date
4 4 Jewish Youth and Religion undated
4 5 Inauguration of Jewish Youth Organization (Hanover) 1928
4 6 To Parents of Jewish Youth (Hanover) 1929
4 7 Die Bedeutung des Judentums 1931
4 8 Gibt es ein Fortleben der Seele nach dem Tode? 1932 November
4 9 Gliederung der Jugendarbeit 1933 October
4 10 Jüdische Geschichte 1933 December
4 11 90th Anniversary of the Women's Association 1934 March
4 12 Inauguration of the Gym 1934 September
4 13 Bar Kochba 1934 Oct.-Nov.
4 14 Judentumserziehung in Heutiger Zeit 1935
4 15 Bar Kochba Table Tennis Tournament 1936 January
4 16 To Parents of Jewish Youth (Hanover) 1936 January
4 17 Inauguration of the Leibniz-Loge 1936 May
4 18 To the Hanover Jugendheim: Raum und Geist 1936 May
4 19 Der wahre Weg: On Rosh ha Shanah; Israelitisches Gemeindeblatt Badens 1936

C) Notes on Lectures

Box Folder Title Date
4 20 Lecture Series Class Members 1923
4 21 Lecture Series Notes 1930-1931
4 22 Lecture Series Notes 1935
4 23 Thank You Letters to Lecture Series Participants 1935
4 24 Religious Education of Jewish Youth (notes) 1936-1937

Subseries 4: Speeches, 1926-1950

This subseries is in German and English.
Scope and Content:

The speeches that make up subseries 4 are largely dedicated to the youth community of the synagogue. However, speeches to other age groups and populations are also present.

Like the lectures, many of the speeches to Jewish youth discuss the strengthening of the community, and describe their role as builders of a Jewish future. Jewish youth are praised as encapsulating the "biological destiny" of their ancestors. They are encouraged to diligently study Hebrew to unlock the secrets of the Jewish faith, and to obey Jewish customs to keep the community strong and vital. Schorsch predicts that from the Jugendheim for Jewish youth a strong foundation will be built for Jews of future generations.

Other speeches of note include Emil Schorsch's inaugural address upon his appointment to Hanover in 1926, a celebration talk on the fiftieth anniversary of a Jewish lodge, and an undated speech on re-education of Germans after the Nazi era.

Box Folder Title Date
4 25 Notes for Speech to Jewish Parents undated
4 26 Outline of Inaugural Speech for Hanover Synagogue 1926 January
4 27 Jugendentwicklung 1929 November
4 28 In Honor of the Loge Brothers 1930 May
4 29 Die Geheimniss des Poal 1930 May
4 30 Ist man Jude, auch wenn man die Religiongesetze nicht hält? 1930 August
4 31 Gedichte, Bedeutung und Liturgie des Channukahfest 1931 November
4 32 Entwicklung der Jugend 1932 January
4 33 Jugend hilft der Jugend 1932 January
4 34 Stand und Entwicklung der jüdischen Jugendbewegung 1933 February
4 35 Die Kunst als Jude zu leben 1933 February
4 36 Realismus und Innerlichkeit 1933 February
4 37 Gemeinnutz geht vor Eigennutz 1933 May
4 38 Jubilaeum, Hillel-Loge (Hildeshein) 1934 March
4 39 Ansprache bei der Präsidenten-Einführung 1934 April
4 40 Installation der Beamten der Leibniz-Loge 1934 April
4 41 Ansprache bei der Einführung 1934 May
4 42 Jewish Education (to parents in Hanover) 1934 June
4 43 The Sabbath (to parents in Hanover) 1934 August
4 44 Jewish Loge Meeting 1934 October
4 45 Jewish Loge Chanukah Celebration 1934 December
4 46 Jewish Loge Meeting 1935 May
4 47 50 Year Anniversary of the Zion Loge 1936 March
4 48 Der Ursprung unserer Ordensideale 1936?
4 49 Der Veranstaltung "der gedeckte Tisch"; Sukkoth 1936 October
4 50 Speech for Succoth 1936 October
4 51 Bar Kochba Table Tennis Championship 1937 March
4 52 Ansprache an die freiwilligen Helfer der Eintopfspendensammlung in Hannover 1937 March
4 53 Speech to the Local Zionist Organization 1937 July
4 54 Winterhilfevorstellung des jüdischen Frauenvereins in Hannover 1937 December
4 55 Passover Speech in Praise of Jewish School 1938 April
4 56 "Is Re-Education of the German People Possible?" mid 1940s
4 57 "The Attitude of Present-Day Germany" after 1963

Subseries 5: Articles, Manuscripts, and General Writings, 1927-1965

This subseries is in German and English.
Scope and Content:

Most of the material in this series appears to be articles and manuscripts, but it is possible they were also used as lectures, speeches, sermons, and drafts for books. Many of the items appear to have been published. In some cases the published version appears in the folder either alone or with the draft.

These materials present the same themes as other writings found in this series. Much of the material describes the need to create a community of Jewish youth that will serve as a strong bastion for Judaism in the future. This goal is to be accomplished by education, and by forming strong communal bonds within the youth community through sporting activities and other forms of fellowship. The need for young people to learn Hebrew is also stressed.

Another portion of the material is made up of religious topics. The history of Jewish religious rites and customs is discussed. Various manuscripts tackle ideas of religiously inspired morality, and are placed in a framework of both Biblical and German philosophical thought.

Box Folder Title Date
4 58 Adon Olam 1965
4 59 Auch wenn er deine Seele nimmt..." Eine Betrachung zum Chanukkahfest-Nachrichtenblatt Hannover 1936 December
4 60 Aufruf an die Mitglieder der jüdischen Gemeinde Hannover 1927 May
4 61 Die Bedeutung Palästinas in pädagogischer Beziehung 1935 June
4 62 Beitrag zu einer Geistes-Geschichte der jüdischen Gemeinschaft Hannover undated
4 63 Bemerkungen zum Jugendgottesdienst undated
4 64 Bericht über die Entwicklung meiner Arbeit, ihre Hemmungen und Störungen 1929 June
4 65 Bericht über die Gefährdeten Sitzung 1927 June
4 66 Bericht über den Religionsunterricht im Schulhjahr 1929/1930 1930
4 67 Betrachtung zum Rauschhaschonfeste undated
4 68 Bibliographie Kabbalistika von Dr. Gerhard Scholem, Leipzig, 1927 1927 September
4 69 Bolschevismus und Religion 1931 November
4 70 Erfahrungen und Grundsätzliches über die jüdische Erwachsenenbildung 1934 June
4 71 Das demokratische und aristokratische Prinzip im Organismus der Loge 1932 May
4 72 Die Fehler der Jüdischen Wohlfahrtspflege in Hannover undated
4 73 Das Fest der Offenbarung 1930 May
4 74 Flucht vor Gott 1936
4 75 Gedanken 1929 August
4 76 Ein Gedenkblatt für Martha Fischer undated
4 77 Geist und Körper 1929 February
4 78 Gesinnungs oder Gesetzesreligion? 1931 November
4 79 "G-d" 1960s
4 80 Das Grundaxion of Judentums undated
4 81 Grundbegriffe der jüdischen Sittenlehre 1927
4 82 Die Grundlagen der religiösen Erlebens undated
4 83 Die Grundlagen der religiösen Symbole 1937 December 7
4 84 Grundsätzliches zur Frage des systematischen Religionsunterrichtes (zugleich eine Buchbesprechung) undated
4 85 Hat Religion in heutiger Zeit noch einen Sinn? (Religion und Wissenschaft) 1931 January
4 86 "How the Bible Would Tell the Story of Hitler" undated
4 87 "In Hütten sollt Ihr wohnen" 1932 October
4 88 Hybris undated
4 89 Ideale unseres Ordens: Jewish Loge 1936 March
4 90 Die Intention des jüdischen Kultus und Ritus undated
4 91 An der Jahreswende 1933 September 20
4 92 Jeder Hungrige Komme und esse! Zum Pessachfest undated
4 93 Jüdische Bildungsarbeit in Hannover 1937
4 94 Jüdische Frömmigkeit in der deutschen Landgemeinde 1930 April
4 95 Jüdische Geschichte 1933 December
4 96 Der jüdischen Schule als Heimat der jüdischen Seele undated
4 97 Jugend und Alter undated
4 98 Das Jugendheim 1934 June
Box Folder Title Date
5 1 Kohelot Notebook undated
5 2 Krankheiten des jüdischen Religionsunterrichtes undated
5 3 Die kultische Form undated
5 4 Leitgedanken für die Beurteilung der religiösen Lehrbücher und der religösen Bestrebungen undated
5 5 Let All Who Are Hungry Come and Eat 1942-1943
5 6 Mahnung an die Jugend 1934 November
5 7 Moralität und Legalität undated
5 8 Jüdischen Jugendverein 1930
5 9 Nicht auf die Schule... undated
5 10 Notes on Jewish History and Education undated
5 11 Notebook on Jewish Philosophy and Ethics 1932
5 12 The Personal God undated
5 13 Pessach undated
5 14 Das Prinzip des Umweges... 1932
5 15 Das Problem des Leidens 1936
5 16 Probleme des Hebräischen Sprachunterrichtes undated
5 17 Probleme der Religionsüberlieferung 1936 August
5 18 Psychology Notes 1931
5 19 Purim als Schicksalfest 1933
5 20 Räume für die Jugend 1931 September 25
5 21 Reflections on Eichmann Trial 1961
5 22 The Religious Year undated
5 23 Die religiöse Krisis undated
5 24 Die Religion der Jugend undated
5 25 Religious Poetry undated
5 26 Report on Meeting of Welfare Committee (manuscript) undated
5 27 Ritus und Symbol 1934 March 29
5 28 Roschaschonoh undated
5 29 Roschaschonoh 1927 September 23
5 30 Die Schöpfungs Probleme undated
5 31 Segen und Flucht in der Geschichte Israel undated
5 32 Sollen Juden Sport treiben? undated
5 33 Tage der Rückkehr 1933
5 34 Die Taten sind anders als die Worte 1931 January 1
5 35 Teachers Conferences-Jewish Education 1927-1935
5 36 The Bible and Jewish History (2 notebooks) undated
5 37 Über die Schächtfrage 1934
5 38 Aus unserer Jugendarbeit 1936 October
5 39 Der Ursprung unserer Ordensidee undated
5 40 Vorträge über Judentum (cover only) undated
5 41 Untitled Manuscript (possibly part of Vorträge über Judentum) undated
5 42 Wandlungen des modernen Denkens 1932 May 2
5 43 Welchen Wahrheits und Bildungswert hat Politik? 1932 August 24
5 44 Wie es zum Ende Kam undated
5 45 Das Zeitalter der Ehrfurchtslosigkeit undated
5 46 Zum Geleit 1936 June 24
5 47 Methode des religiösen Lehrens 1929 November 6
5 48 Miscellaneous undated

Subseries 6: Research Materials, 1791-1934

This subseries is in German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 6 consists primarily of extracts from various books discussing religion and spirituality, apparently copied by Emil Schorsch on a typewriter for research purposes. A number of publications have been separated from the collection and removed to the Leo Baeck Institute library, provided there were no notes or other markings on the items. (See "Separated Materials" at the beginning of the finding aid). The folders are arranged alphabetically by title.

Box Folder Title Date
5 49 Entwicklungslehre und Religion (Text by Lucanus) undated
5 50 Erklärung deutscher Juden undated
5 51 Das Erste Buch der Tora (B. Jacob) 1934
5 52 Evangelische Kirche und Judentum (Eduard Lamparter) 1928
5 53 Excerpts from Various Publications undated
5 54 Grundlagen und Ziele jüdischer Pädagogik undated
5 55 Explanation of the Haggadah (notebook) undated
5 56 Jüdischer Religionsunterricht 1932 February
5 57 Die Kulturuntergangslehren... 1929 January 21
5 58 Die Mischehe als Problem des Judentums der Gegenwart undated
5 59 Die neuren Strömungen... 1930
5 60 Vom ewigen Leben (Christoph Schremp) undated
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Series IV: Hanover, 1914-1968

This series is in German and English.
0.5 linear feet
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series IV chronicles the history of the Jewish community of Hanover both before, during, and after the time Emil Schorsch served as rabbi in the community. Included are detailed listings of Jews deported by the Nazis from Hanover, financial records, personal records, such as wedding certificates, and photographs. There are also articles and documents concerning Rabbi Freund, the head Rabbi of the Hanover community, as well as articles that were written in response to the dedication of the new synagogue in Hanover in 1963, the text of the inauguration speech by Emil Schorsch, and other published information about the dedication.

Box Folder Title Date
5 61 Jewish Community Budget 1914
5 62 Report on Jewish Social Services 1927-1928
5 63 Achtzig Jahre Hannoverischer Kurier 1928 May 12
5 64 Jewish Community Budgets 1929-1934
5 65 Article about Hanover Jewish Community (Israelitisches Familienblatt) 1931
5 66 Wedding Certificates 1928-1935
5 67 Jewish Children and Youth in Hanover (report) 1929-1937
5 68 Rabbi Freund-Article about Retirement 1938
5 69 Rabbi Freund-Mein Leben 1938 September
5 70 Rabbi Freund-Documents 1932-1938
5 71 Deportation List 1941-1943
5 72 Monument in Memory of the Kristallnacht 1959
5 73 Jewish History of Hanover (article) 1963
5 74 Dedication of New Synagogue 1963
5 75 Photographs (old and new synagogue) undated and 1963
5 76 Emigration List 1966 December 12
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Series V: Clippings, 1930-1999

This series is in German and English.
0.25 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical and Chronological

Scope and Content:

Series 5 contains clippings from various newspapers collected by Emil Schorsch. The articles are many and cover a wide variety of subjects, including but not limited to topics that occur in other areas of the collection. Articles on Jewish educational activities can be found mixed in with, for example, an article about the history of the Frankfurt streetcar system, an art exhibit, or a human-interest article. The articles do not generally deal with news contemporary to the time period. The articles are organized into three sections: Topics, Newspapers, and Miscellaneous. Topics are alphabetized by the title of either the article or the topic. The newspapers section is comprised of partial or complete issues of entire newspapers, and in alphabetical order by title. The various folders contain many hundreds of clippings, kept together as originally grouped by Emil Schorsch. They are loosely chronological in order by folder.

One article describes a memorial service of the Reichsbund jüdischer Frontsoldaten in honor of the death of President Hindenburg in 1934. This series also contains the infamous issue of Der Stürmer in which the Jews were charged with a history of ritually murdering "Christian" children for the Passover. This issue is preserved in its entirety.

A) Topics

Box Folder Title Date
5 77 Julius A. Freund (obituary) 1977
5 78 New Synagogue in Hanover 1963
5 79 Paul von Hindenburg 1934 August 24
5 80 Die jüdischen Mittel-und Kleingemeinde 1937
5 81 Ein Land ohne Gott by Theodor Heuss 1926 June 14
5 82 Article about Emil Schorsch (by Ismar Schorsch) 1999
5 83 Psychoanalyse und Pädagogik 1930 February 18

B) Newspapers

Box Folder Title Date
5 84 Bayerische Israelitische Gemeindezeitung 1935 July 1
5 85 Frankfurter Zeitung (multiple articles) 1935-1937
5 86 Israelitisches Familienblatt Hanover 1916
5 87 Jüdisches Gemeindeblatt Hanover 1938 August 26
5 88 Die Jugend 1927 February
5 89 Der Stürmer 1934 May

C) Miscellaneous

Box Folder Title Date
5 90 Clippings from Newspapers 1929-1935
5 91 Clippings from Newspapers 1930-1937
5 92 Clippings from Newspapers 1935-1937
5 93 Clippings from Jewish Newspapers 1936
5 94 Clippings from Newspapers 1937-1938
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Series VI: Miscellaneous, 1924-1977

This series is in German.
0.5 linear feet
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series VI contains material collected by Emil Schorsch that does not subscribe to the definitions of the other series. Items include copies of essays written by authors other than Schorsch, financial records, and records concerning Jewish education.

Box Folder Title Date
6 1 Aufruf zum Jugendgottesdienst (not by Emil Schorsch) undated
6 2 Bible Quotes undated
6 3 Das Buchenwalde-Lied (by Dr. Beda Loehrner) undated
6 4 Three Religious Stories (by Emma Heinemann) 1929
6 5 Israelite Orphan Asylum undated
6 6 Jewish Education Records 1924-1936
6 7 Das Juedische Kind (by Berthold Rosenthal) undated
6 8 Kampf gegen die Geschlechtskrankheiten (lecture by Helen Wilson) 1930 May 2
6 9 Lehrkurse Schedule 1936-1937
6 10 Likutei Sichos 1971
6 11 Die Neue Synagogue in Düsseldorf 1958
6 12 Bank Forms 1934
6 13 Review of Emil Schorsch's Raum und Geist undated
6 14 Sokolow-Gedenkfeier undated
6 15 Richard Weil Chronology 1941 December
6 16 Zu Leben fuer Gesang und Klavier (by Julius Gessinger) 1977 June 3
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